World 200m champion Shericka Jackson, Commonwealth Games 110m hurdles gold medallist Rasheed Broadbell and Christopher Taylor have all been included in Jamaica’s 39-member team to the NACAC Area Championships set to run from August 19-21 in The Bahamas.

Six Trinidadian nationals were arrested and charged today Friday, August 12, 2022, in connection with the incident involving Anderson Peters, which occurred on board the Harbour Master Vessel on Wednesday night in St. George’s, Grenada, the Royal Grenada Police have revealed.

According to the police, John Alexander, 55, a deck hand of Arima; Mikhail John, 35, a sailor of San Juan; Noel Cooper, 42, Captain of Gurpe; Lance Wiggins, 45, a sailor of Cocorite and Sheon Jack, 28, a Sailor of Cocorite were all charged with one count each of grievous harm and stealing, while Abiola Benjamin, 40, Operations Manager and police officer of Maraval was charged with assault on Anderson Peters.

Alexander, John, Cooper, Wiggins and Jack were also charged with causing harm to Kiddon Peters, the brother of Anderson Peters.

All of the accused individuals are scheduled to appear in court on Monday, August 15, 2022.

The men will remain in police custody until their appearance before the Magistrate.

Six people remain in police custody in Grenada in connection with the attack on world javelin champion Anderson Peters on the Harbour Master party time on the Spice Island on Wednesday night, the Royal Grenada Police reported on Friday.

Investigations are continuing about the incident wherein the athlete was involved in a brawl with several men said to be from Trinidad and Tobago but so far no charges have been filed, police said. However, there are concerns over the athlete’s health following the incident.

The police said he was treated at a hospital and released but Paul Phillip, who coaches the athlete revealed on the Sportsmax Zone on Friday evening that Peters’ suffered injury to his left ankle as well as bruises to his elbow, neck and face.

According to Phillip, the ankle injury is of greatest concern as that is the ankle Peters’ throws off and it appears he has suffered a sprain which could prevent him from competing at the Diamond League meeting in Lausanne on August 26.

The incident has drawn strong reactions across the region including Brian Lewis, President of the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees (CANOC) who expressed “shock and dismay” at the incident.

Discussions at a diplomatic level have also been engaged between representatives of Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago, who have said that it is hoped that justice will be served.

President of the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees (CANOC), Brian Lewis, has expressed shock and dismay at the contents of a video showing Grenada Javelin world champion Anderson Peters being beaten up and thrown off a boat on Wednesday.

The incident, which has caused uproar around the region, is still being investigated in his homeland Grenada where it occurred.  The Royal Grenada Police Force (RGPF) is expected to hand a file to the country’s Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) in short order.

Details surrounding the cause of the incident, however, remain unclear.  The company at the heart of the incident Trinidad-based Harbour Tours Ltd has, however, also condemned the incident and promised a separate investigation.

On behalf of CANOC, Lewis spoke of the feelings of disappointment upon witnessing the incident and wished the athlete a speedy recovery.

“There are no words to adequately express my regret, disappointment, and dismay at what was seen on the video of an altercation involving Grenada and Caribbean Sports Hero Anderson Peters,” Lewis said via the release.

“We at CANOC wish Anderson a speedy and full recovery. Even as the Grenada Police conduct a full investigation to ascertain the facts about what transpired,” he added.

“In resolving and de-escalating conflict Acts of Violence can't be condoned.

We trust that Anderson with support from his family, friends, and the Grenada Olympic Movement will fully recover. There are lessons from this unfortunate situation that we can all learn from as we continue to mentor and nurture and support our Caribbean athletes, youth, and young people to fulfill their potential and aspirations."

Prime Minister of Grenada Dickon Mitchell has condemned the attack on 2022 World javelin champion Anderson Peters on Wednesday night and expects a speedy conclusion to the investigation being conducted by the Royal Grenada Police.

No one has yet been charged in connection with the incident night in which Grenada’s javelin world champion was beaten and thrown overboard a boat in his homeland on Wednesday.

It was yet another world-leading run for Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce at the Meeting Herculis EBS Diamond League in Monaco on Wednesday but this time the field was closer; a lot closer.

The 35-year-old Jamaican ran a meet record of 10.62 for victory but Shericka Jackson ran a lifetime best of 10.71 to take the runner-up spot just ahead of Marie Jose Ta Lou, who ran a personal best and area record 10.72 for third.

Aleia Hobbs of the United States equalled her season-best 10.81 for fourth.

This was the record-extending sixth consecutive final in which the diminutive Jamaican has run faster than 10.70 seconds and the two-time Olympic champion was quite pleased with the performance but hinted that she is planning to take a break after what has been an intense schedule.

“I had now three back-to-back races so I will take some time for recovery and see what I´m able to do with some rest before I come back,” she said.

“I did what I needed to do and we had fun and let the clock do the talking. I cannot be disappointed with the season. To be able to run 10.6 consistently means a lot to me. It is remarkable. It is very hard to keep the speed at this high level.

“I´m in my late 30’s and I think I feel like I have more to give. I look forward to doing my personal best for the rest of the season and run fast.”

The Jamaican speed-queen was not the only Caribbean winner at the meet on the night as Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas raced to a fast 49.28 to win the 400m in commanding fashion over Candice McLeod who ran a season-best 49.89, her first time under 50 seconds for the season. Finishing third was Commonwealth Games champion Sada Williams, who ran 51.10.

Commonwealth Games finalist Rushell Clayton ran a brand new lifetime best of 53.33 to win the 400m hurdles to defeat Commonwealth Games champion Janieve Russell, who ran a season-best 53.52.

Panama’s Gianna Woodruff was third in 54.13.

Natoya Goule rebounded from the disappointment of just missing out on a medal at the Commonwealth Games to run a season-best 1:56.98.

Goule won by five metres ahead Sage Hurta ran a new personal best of 1:57.85. Her compatriot Olivia Baker was third in a season-best 1:58:05.

“I feel extremely proud because I finally dropped the time under 57. I knew it was in me…this is really the track where you can run fast but I am just thankful for the win and the season best,” said Goule who missed out on a medal by 0.01 at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham.

“I just wanted to ensure I ran a smart race because it was getting fast. I am glad that I finished strong because sometimes when you run 56, you do not have the kick but I still got it today. I was so happy when I crossed the line and saw the time. It would be nice to get a PR this season. I know it is a bit challenging but I take it step by step.”

Hansle Parchment, still recovering from the injury that kept him out of the finals of the 110m hurdles at the 2022 World Championships and the Commonwealth Games ran a season-best 13.08 but finished third to Grant Holloway, who ran a 12.99 season-best for the win.

NCAA champion Trey Cunningham ran 13.03 for second place.

In the field, Shanieka Ricketts jumped 14.91, her second-best mark of the season to be runner-up to Olympic and World Champion Yulimar Rojas, who needed a mark of 15.01 to take the win.

The USA’s Tori Franklin jumped a lifetime best of 14.86 for third place.

Noah Lyles of the USA raced to a meet record 19.46 to win the 200m leaving teen sensation Erriyon Knighton 19.84 and Michael Norman 19.95 floundering in his wake.

 

 

 

 

Trinidad and Tobago athletes who won medals at the recently concluded 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England, will have some extra cash to spend this year under the twin-island republic Ministry of Sports’ Reward and Incentives Framework, according to reports.

Under the programme, cyclist Nicholas Paul and sprinter Jereem Richards will be the primary beneficiaries as both men are responsible for the three gold medals the country won in Birmingham.

Paul won gold in the keirin, silver in the match sprint and bronze in the 1000m time trials and is set to receive TT$437,500 while Richards, who won the 200m title in a Games record 19.80 and anchored the country’s 4x400m relay to the gold medal is set to receive TT$375,000.

According to the Trinidad Guardian, athletes competing in relay team events will earn $125,000 each for a gold medal, $62,500 for silver and for bronze, $31,250. Individual gold medals get a whopping TT$250,000.

That means Dwight St Hillaire, Asa Guevara and Machel Cedenio will each get $125,000 and the members of the 4x100 metres team - Jerod Elcock, Eric Harrison Jnr, Kion Benjamin and Kyle Greaux - will each get $62,500 for their silver medal run.

Ahead of her much-anticipated clash with five-time 100m world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in Monaco on Wednesday, 200m world champion Shericka Jackson has revealed that she has not yet achieved her goal in the 100m.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson and Rasheed Broadbell scored impressive victories in their respective events at the 12th Gyulai Istav Memorial in Hungary on Monday.

The 2022 World 100m champion has made running 10.6s a habit this year following yet another time of 10.67 at the meet where she ran 10.82 to finish second to Elaine Thompson-Herah in 2021.  Back then Thompson-Herah won in a meet record of 10.71.

The 35-year-old Fraser-Pryce eclipsed that record after achieving her fifth time this year under 10.70 seconds having run 10.67 in Nairobi in May, 10.67 in Paris in June, 10.67 in Eugene in July and a world-leading 10.66 in Silesia on Saturday. No other woman in history has run as many times under 10.70s in any one season.

The USA’s Tamari Davis finished second in 10.92 while Switzerland’s Mujinga Kambundji was third in 10.99.

Yohan Blake (10.03) and Ackeem Blake (10.05) were fourth and fifth, respectively in the men’s 100m won by the USA’s Marvin Bracy in 9.97. Trayvon Bromell finished second in 10.01, the same time as Elijah Hall as 0.04 separated second to fifth.

Jackson cruised to victory in the 200m in 22.02 finishing well clear of Kambundji at 22.45 and Kaylia Whyte of the USA, who was third in 22.46. Tynia Gaither of the Bahamas was fifth in 22.63.

Erriyon Knighton won the men’s race in 19.88. Aaron Brown finished second in 20.24. Alexander Ogando was third in 20.46.

Fresh off his Commonwealth Games 110m hurdles title that he won in a championship record of 13.08, Rasheed Broadbell came from behind to edge World Champion Grant Holloway at the line to win the event in 13.12. Holloway was given the same time while Daniel Roberts was third in 13.13.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the hurdles in a slightly windy 12.27 over Kendra Harrison at 12.49 and Nia Ali at 12.60.

Commonwealth Games champion Janieve Russell clocked 54.14 for second place and Rushell Clayton finished third in 54.45 in the 400m hurdles race more than two seconds behind Olympic, World Champion and world-record holder Sydney McLaughlin, who established yet another meet record with her time of 51.68.

 

 

 

 

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce was one of several high-profile athletes to miss the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England.

In July, Fraser-Pryce won her fifth 100m World title with a 10.67 clocking at the World Championships in Eugene. She also won silver medals in the 200m (21.81) and 4x100m. With just a week between the end of the World Championships and the start of the Track and Field program at the Commonwealth Games, Fraser-Pryce explained that the short turnaround wasn’t ideal for her.

“Well, the Commonwealth Games was just never on the agenda for me this year,” 2022’s fastest woman explained in an interview with Mirror. “Especially because I did the double at the World Championships, it took a lot out of me to do, and the 4x100m.”

"So, to come back maybe a week or two after to do another three rounds and possibly two in the 4x100m, my coach said that would probably be too much for me to handle right now if I’m thinking about longevity and wanting to get to Paris 2024, so I had to be strategic about that,” she added.

Jamaica's women 4x400m relay team got an unexpected surprise in the final track event at the Commonwealth Games on Sunday when England's team that crossed the line first in 3:25.83 was disqualified for a lane infringement. They have subsequently filed an appeal.

This means Jamaica's team comprised of 400m hurdles silver medallist Shian Salmon, Junelle Bromfield, Roneisha McGregor and Natoya Goule that ran 3:26.93 will leave Birmingham as 4x400m runners-up.

The development also means Canada has now been crowned 2022 Commonwealth Games champions. They had finished second in 3:25.84. Scotland finished fourth in a season-best of 3:30.15 but has been upgraded to the bronze medal.

 

Trinidad and Tobago won its third gold medal at the 2022 Commonwealth Games on Sunday when Jereem Richards led them to an emphatic victory in the 4x400m.

Kerrica Hill set a new championship record as Jamaica pulled off a 1-2 finish on the final day of the 2022 World Athletics U20 Championships in Cali, Colombia on Saturday, August 6.

On a day when Jamaica celebrated the 60th anniversary of its independence, Hill, the gold-medal favourite uncorked a blistering time of 12.77 to fulfil expectations.

It was her second gold medal of the World U20 Championships as she was a member of Jamaica's 4x100m team that set a world record 42.59 on Friday night.

Her compatriot Alexis James was also impressive securing the silver medal in a new personal best of 12.87. It was her third lifetime best in a matter of days. She ran 13.04 in the heats and 12.94s in the semi-finals.

Hungary’s Hannah Toth ran a national U20 record of 13.00 for the bronze medal.

Jamaica won two more medals on the final day following silver medal runs in the 4x400m relays.

The team of Dejanea Oakley, Abigail Campbell, Oneika McAnuff and Alliah Baker ran a season-best 3:31.59 to finish second to the USA who ran 3:28.06 for the gold medal.

Great Britain (3:31.86) took the bronze.

Jamaica’s men aided by an outstanding anchor leg from Delano Kennedy, powered their way into a podium spot in 3:05.72, finishing behind the USA, who won in a season-best 3:04.47.

Shemar Palmer, Shaemar Uter and Jasauna Dennis were the other members of the team.

Canada finished third in a national U20 record of 3:06.50.

Kennedy was fifth on the final handover and surged past the field to win Jamaica a national record 16th medal of the championships, the most by any team in Cali.

It was the highest number of medals ever won by Jamaica at the World U20 Championships topping the 12 medals won at the 2018 championships in Tampere, Finland.

Jamaica won six gold, seven silver and three bronze medals at the championships, one more than the United States, whose 4x400m victories saw them win seven gold, four silver and four bronze medals.

 

 

  

Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica won sprint relay medals on Sunday with silver and bronze medals, respectively, at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England.

Despite the absence of 200m champion Jereem Richards Trinidad and Tobago’s team of Jerod Elcock, Eric Harrison Jr, Kion Benjamin Hislop and Kyle Greaux raced to a season-best 38.70 to claim second place behind England that ran a season-best 38.35 for the gold medal.

Nigeria ran 38.81 for the bronze.

Meanwhile, Jamaica’s women owe a debt of gratitude to sprint-double champion Elaine Thompson-Herah for their bronze medal as Kemba Nelson, Remona Burchell and Natalliah Whyte were unable to put Jamaica in contention for a medal over the first three legs.

However, at the final exchange with Jamaica in fifth, the fastest woman alive, stormed down the home stretch to snatch the bronze medal from Australia.

Jamaica clocked a relatively pedestrian 43.08, well behind England who ran a season-best 42.41 for the silver and winners Nigeria, who stormed to a new area record of 42.10.

Australia clocked 43.16 for fourth.

© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.