Jamaica secured 24 medals to lead all Caribbean nations at the 2022 NACAC Open Championships which concluded on Sunday in Freeport, Bahamas.

Entering Sunday’s final day with 12 medals, the Jamaicans doubled their tally to finish second overall on the medal table, trailing the USA who finished with 69.

Those 24 medals were split into six golds, nine silvers and nine bronzes. Cuba was the next best placed Caribbean country with six medals including two golds, one silver and three bronzes.

Jamaica’s final day was highlighted by Andrew Hudson’s personal best 19.87 to win the 200m.

Hosts The Bahamas was next with one gold, two silvers and four bronzes for seven medals overall. That gold medal came from hometown hero Shaunae Miller-Uibo who ran 49.40 to win the 400m.

Also registering gold medals were The British Virgin Islands through Kyron McMaster’s brilliant season’s best 47.34 in the 400m hurdles and Dominica through Thea LaFond's 14.49m in the triple jump.

Trinidad & Tobago got silvers in the men’s 4x100m and men’s javelin through Keshorn Walcott

Bermuda (one silver), St Vincent & The Grenadines (one silver), Barbados (one silver), Antigua & Barbuda (one bronze) and Puerto Rico (one bronze) also registered medals.

Dominica’s Thea LaFond is the 2022 women’s triple jump champion after she jumped 14.49m on her final jump to win the event on the final day of the NACAC Senior Championships in The Bahamas on Sunday.

Andrew Hudson unleashed his frustrations at missing out on the World Championships in July at the 2022 NACAC Championships in the Bahamas on Sunday winning the 200m final in a lifetime best and new meet record of 19.87.

In doing so, the Jamaican 200m champion, won his very first medal for Jamaica in an international competition.

Hudson,  the Texas Tech alum whose transfer of allegiance from the United States did not take effect until July 28, causing him to miss representing Jamaica at the World Championships in Oregon, took command of the race from the gun to clock a massive personal best.

In his wake was the America duo of Kyree King, who ran 20.00 for the silver medal and Josephus Lyles, the brother of world 200m champion, Noah Lyles, who clocked 20.18 for the bronze medal.

The USA took the women’s race as Brittany Brown sped to 22.34 for the gold medal ahead of Tynia Gaither of the Bahamas and A’Keyla Mitchell of the USA who ran 22.53 for the bronze medal.

Kyron McMaster and Shian Salmon took the respective 400m hurdles titles on the final day of the NACAC Championships in The Bahamas on Sunday.

Early challenges faced by the Jamaican contingent when they arrived in the Bahamas week, have not prevented the 39-member team from racking up medals at the 2022 NACAC Open Championships.

Distance runner Adelle Tracey was delighted to celebrate her first medal for Jamaica, a bronze, in the women’s 800m, at the 2022 NACAC Championships in the Bahamas on Saturday.

The athlete, who switched allegiance from Great Britain to Jamaica in June, made her debut at the IAAF World Championships but was unable to take part in the Commonwealth Games earlier this month due to protocols surrounding the international transfer.

The athlete was, however, able to return to the track for the NACAC Games where she finished third in the women’s 800m behind the US pair of Ajee and Allie Wilson.  Ajee finished just ahead of her compatriot Allie in a  photo finish 1:58.47 to 1:58.48.

The Jamaican finished third in 1:59.54 only her second time under 2 minutes, behind her personal best, which came at the IAAF World Championship in Eugene, Oregon in July.  Tracey was delighted with the result and performance.

“Ajee set a really tough pace from the get-go, that was great for me because I actually ran my second fastest time.  It was very hot today, it’s super windy.  I just made it hard but there is a lot of travel in my legs,” Tracey said after the race.

  “I was kind of hoping it would have been a bit more tactical but that was a really honest race and there are some really fast girls in there so I’m really happy with it,” she added.

The distance runner was also delighted to have made the trip.

"It feels like a really special place and this is my first medal as a Jamaican athlete as well, so, I really love the Bahamas.”

The Jamaicans also picked up other medals on the night when Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper claimed silver in the women’s 100m hurdles and another bronze for Orlando Bennett in the men’s 110m hurdles.

Bahamas' Shaunae Miller-Uibo put on a show for her hometown fans with a dominant display to win the women’s 400m on day 2 of the NACAC Athletics Championships, in Grand Bahama, on Saturday.

The Olympic and World Champion left very little to doubt as she left the blocks and quickly covered the field by the top of the straight.

World championship bronze medalist Sada Williams of Barbados looked to battle back against Miller-Uibo down the stretch but the Bahamian had enough to pull a few metres clear by the finish line.

Miller-Uibo, who has lost just once in 8 races over the distance this season, stopped the clock in 49.40, her fourth fastest time of the season.  Williams finished second in 49.86, while Jamaica’s Stephenie-Ann Mcpherson was third in 50.36.

In the men’s equivalent, Jamaica’s Christopher Taylor recorded his fastest time over the distance this season after outbattling his opponents down the stretch to stop the clock at 44.63, only his second time below 45 seconds this season.  Another Jamaican Nathon Allen was second in 45.04 with the United States’ Bryce Deadmon third in 45.06.

2020 Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper and 2022 World Indoor silver medallist Devynne Charlton both advanced to the final of the Women’s 100m hurdles at the NACAC Open Championships in Freeport, the Bahamas on Friday.

Jamaica’s Tapper qualified fastest with a 12.62 effort to win semi-final one while Charlton of the Bahamas finished second in the second semi-final in 12.76 to advance. Puerto Rico’s Paola Vazquez (13.34) and Cuba’s Acevedo Lopez (13.43) also advanced to the final.

Costa Rica’s Gerald Drummond (49.68), BVI’s Kyron McMaster (49.77), Jamaica’s Shawn Rowe (50.27), Cuba’s Lazaro Fernandez (50.37), The Bahamas’ Shakeem Smith (50.55) and Haiti’s Joshua Adhemar (52.21) all advanced to the final of the 400m hurdles.

In the 200m, Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte (22.78) and Ashley Williams (23.67) both advanced to the Women’s final along with The Bahamas’ Tynia Gaither (22.82), Trinidad & Tobago’s Mauricia Prieto (23.48) and Reyare Thomas (24.00) and Grenada’s Amanda Crawford (24.32).

On the Men’s side, Jamaica’s Andrew Hudson was the fastest qualifier to the final with 20.25. He’ll be joined in the event by teammate Jazeel Murphy (20.80), Trinidad & Tobago’s Kyle Greaux (20.68), The Bahamas’ Ian Kerr (20.89), Antigua & Barbuda’s Darrion Skerritt (21.17) and Bermuda’s Suresh Black (21.42).

In the field, Jamaica’s O’Dayne Richards threw 20.05m for bronze in the men’s shot put behind Americans Roger Steen (20.78m) and Adrian Piperi (20.76m).

The region also got silver and bronze in the men’s triple jump thanks to Bermuda’s Jah Nhai Perinchief (15.89m) and Antigua & Barbuda’s Taeco O’Garro (15.70m). Gold went to the USA’s Chris Bernard with 16.40m.

 

World championships gold medallist Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Commonwealth champion Sada Williams have both advanced to the final of the 400m of the 2022 NACAC Open Championships that got underway in Freeport, the Bahamas on Friday.

The four men who pleaded guilty to causing grievous harm to Grenada’s elite athlete Anderson Peters were each fined a total of EC$5,500 when they appeared before a judge in the St George’s No.1 Magistrates Court on Wednesday.

All four Trinidadians were ordered remanded in custody until the fines are paid. Failure to pay the fines could mean up to 18 months in prison for each man.

Mikhail John, a 35-year-old sailor, John Alexander, a 55-year-old deckhand, Noel Cooper, 42, the captain of the Harbour Master party boat, and Sheon Jack, a 28-year-old sailor, all pleaded guilty to charges of grievous harm against Anderson Peters and his brother Kiddon.

On the charge of grievous harm, each man was fined EC$3500 to be paid forthwith and in default face a year in prison; on the charge of causing harm each man was fined US$2000 to be paid forthwith or face six months imprisonment.

On Monday, prosecutors dropped the charges against 40-year-old Abiola Benjamin after reviewing a video of the incident that showed he was trying to separate the men involved in the altercation in which Peters suffered injuries to his ankle, elbow and face and was thrown overboard.

Meanwhile, 45-year-old sailor Lance Wiggins pleaded not guilty to the charges and was eventually released after prosecutors decided that the evidence against him was insufficient to bring about prosecution.

Peters was beaten and thrown overboard the Harbour Master party boat on the night of Wednesday, August 10. He suffered injuries to his ankle, elbow, and shoulder. He now faces a race against time to recover in order to complete his season on the Diamond League circuit.

If he is unable to, he stands to potentially lose tens of thousands of US dollars in earnings.

Peters has retained the services of Derick Sylvester in his quest to pursue a civil case against the convicted men.

 

 

World 100m Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will clash with British 2019 World 100m silver medallist Dina Asher-Smith in the blue-ribbon event at the Brussels Diamond League meeting on September 2.

Jamaica’s Fraser-Pryce, who won her fifth world title in Eugene last month, has run world leading times at the last two Diamond League stops in Silesia and Monaco.

Unbeaten in the 100m this season, the Jamaican has produced six sub 10.7 times so far and will look to add a seventh and book a spot in the Diamond League final in Zurich on September 7-8.

Asher-Smith, who won gold in the 200m at the 2019 World Championships in Doha to go along with her 100m silver, has a season’s best of 10.83 which she ran to finish fourth at the World Championships in Eugene.

Marie-Josee Ta Lou, who sped to a personal best and African record 10.72 to finish third behind Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson in Monaco, will also be in the race as well as the USA’s Sha’Carri Richardson.

Four of the six Trinidadians charged last week Friday, August 12, in connection with the assault on Grenada's Anderson Peters, the 2022 World javelin champion, pleaded guilty in the St George's Magistrates Court in Grenada on Monday.

They are set to return to the St George’s No.1 Magistrates Court on Wednesday facing the possibility of a maximum five-year prison sentence and hefty fines.

Mikhail John, a 35-year-old sailor, John Alexander, a 55-year-old deckhand, Noel Cooper, 42, the captain of the Harbour Master party boat, and Sheon Jack, a 28-year-old sailor, all pleaded guilty to charges of grievous harm against Anderson Peters and his brother Kiddon.

Prosecutors dropped the charges against 40-year-old Abiola Benjamin after a review of a video of the incident showed he was trying to separate the men involved in the altercation in which Peters suffered injuries to his ankle, elbow and face and was thrown overboard.

Meanwhile, 45-year-old sailor Lance Wiggins pleaded not guilty to the charges and was eventually released after prosecutors decided that the evidence against him was insufficient to bring about a successful prosecution.

Peters, 24, was involved in a brawl aboard the Harbour Master on the night of Wednesday, August 10. Video of the incident showed several men attacking and punching Peters, who had travelled home for a brief vacation after winning the silver medal at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England a few days prior.

His coach Paul Phillip said the two-time world champion suffered from what appeared to be an ankle sprain as well as bruises to his elbow, neck and face, which put his participation in the Lausanne Diamond League meeting on August 26 in doubt.

In a statement released on the weekend, the captain of the Harbour Master claimed that it was Peters who was the aggressor and is what triggered the beat-down the elite athlete suffered.

Peters and his brother were in court Monday and were seated behind the six suspects. Reports indicate that Peters and his brother have retained the services of attorney Derick Sylvester with a view to filing a civil suit against the guilty.

 

Captain of the Harbour Master, Neil Cooper, says Anderson Peters was, in fact, the aggressor in last week’s highly publicized incident on the vessel that led to the arrests of six men involved.

“It was an attack on the Harbour Master crew…not Anderson Peters,” Cooper said in a statement issued on Saturday.

The narrative all along was that the crew assaulted Peters, who won his second World title in the Javelin in Eugene last month, and then threw him overboard but Cooper says this couldn’t be further from the truth.

“On August 10, the crew and I had just successfully sailed the Recovery Cruise. I instructed the deckhand team to begin preparing the boat for our next cruise which was scheduled for 8 o’clock. After some time, I went to check on the crew and saw them asking a group of young men to leave the ship. My team tried encouraging the men to leave but again, the group (who I didn’t know at the time included World Champion Anderson Peters) refused to leave the ship. Anderson began to get aggressive and pace up and down the ramp. I approached him and asked him to leave. He then cursed at me, disrespected my nationality, and insulted me for being Trinidadian. I asked Anderson four times to leave the vessel and each time he responded with aggression and cursed at me.”

He further stated,” What happened next is where the issue started. While on the ramp, I informed Anderson that I was the captain of the ship. He responded by cursing at me and throwing water in my face. I tried avoiding further altercation by walking away from him, off the ramp and back onto the main deck. When I got there, I realized a member of Anderson’s clan had assaulted my cruise manager, Benji, by slapping him in his face. My crew tried once again to get the men off the boat, but they continued to refuse with aggression. All men continued to curse at us. Anderson then spat at me and began throwing punches at my face. My crew and I did not start the confrontation, Anderson and his group did. As any team would, we defended ourselves from the ongoing attack.”

Cooper then outlined how Peters ended up in the water.

“The brawl eventually moved to the ramp. With all the scuffling, Anderson lost his balance and fell into the water. No one threw him into the water! It’s upsetting to see reports that my crew and I threw him into the water. We were relieved to see that Anderson was pulled up out of the water and was safe, but even then, he continued to be aggressive towards us and refused to leave the boat. Eventually, the police arrived on the boat, and a mob gathered outside saying that we attacked Grenada’s National Hero.”

“In my profession, I make an ode to protecting all souls on every vessel I captain. I would never intentionally harm another human. I understand Grenada’s love for Anderson Peters but I believe the public should know the truth about the situation,” he added.

 

Could Shely-Ann Fraser Pryce's meet record of 10.60 be on borrowed time when three of the four fastest women in the world this year line up for the 100m at the Lausanne Diamond League meeting on August 26?

Jamaica sprint queen Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has put together one of the most exceptional seasons in track and field history, after dominating the 100m at the World Championships, and clocking a number of blistering times, she has just one objective left, to keep running fast.  

Earlier this week, the sprinter clocked a speedy 10.62 at the Monaco Diamond League meet.  The time was the athlete’s best this season and just two hundredths of a second outside her personal best.  Even more remarkable was the fact that the performance marked the sprinter’s 6th sub-10.7 time this season, the most by any female athlete in history.

Despite all that she has achieved so far, the sprinter is not quite ready to end the season just yet.

“To be able to run 10.6 consistently means a lot to me. It is remarkable. It is very hard to keep the speed at this high level,” Fraser-Pryce said.

“It is important for me to deliver fast times because I´m looking forward for myself to having a great season,” she added.

“I´m in my late thirties, and I think I feel like I have more to give. I look forward to doing my Personal Best for the rest of the season and running fast.

“As a sprinter, you always want to run on the fast track. The only target I have for the rest of the season is just to run fast. Now, we break, and then we come again. Not sure about Lausanne yet.”

With five events to go Fraser-Pryce is also in contention for the 100m Diamond League title.

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