Caribbean motoring fraternity mourns the death of former JRDC president Hilary Jardine

By October 18, 2021

Jamaica's motoring fraternity is mourning the passing of former Jamaica Race Drivers Club (JRDC) president Hilary Jardine on Sunday, October 17.

Jardine, who was born in Guyana but migrated to Jamaica in the 1960s, has been credited as one of the founding fathers of Jamaica’s racing fraternity and served as president of the JRDC from 2006 to 2011 when he retired shortly after he was re-elected for a third term.

Christopher McFarlane, who succeeded Jardine as president lauded him as a true citizen of the Caribbean.

“I served on the Jamaica Race Driver's Club for many years with Hilary Jardine and took over from him as president of the club in 2011, where we remained close and I always reached out to him for advice,” McFarlane recalled.

“Hilary was not from one place.  Hilary was a true Caribbean citizen, contributing to motorsports for decades, from motorcycles to cars, to making both Caribbean Championships. I am truly sad that in the last year or maybe more, we have not spoken.  We used to speak often enough, but when the world changed, staying in touch was different.

My sincerest condolences to the entire Jardine family and the Caribbean motorsport fraternity on the loss of one of our hero dem.”

The Jamaica Millennium Motoring Club (JMMC) said Jardine will be remembered for his significant contributions to motorsport in Jamaica and the Caribbean.

“Affectionately known as “Sir Hilary”, he was a stalwart of Jamaican motorsport for several decades,” said the JMMC in a statement released on Monday.

“Born in Guyana, he was one of the founding members of the British Guiana Motorcycle Club in 1955 and, in the 1960’s he revived the motorcycle club in Trinidad and Tobago. Hilary, who lived in Jamaica since 1969, founded and served as President of the Jamaica Motor Racing Association during the 1970s. He served as President of the Jamaica Race Drivers Club from 2006 to 2011. In recognition of his contribution to sport, the Government of Jamaica awarded Hilary Jardine the Order of Distinction in 2009.

Hilary is remembered for an outstanding and passionate contribution to motorsport in Jamaica and the Caribbean.”

Jardine, who was 91, was conferred with the Order of Distinction for his contribution to motorsport in 2009.

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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