Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, the celebrated Olympic gold medalist known affectionately as the "Pocket Rocket," ignited the spirit of Easter joy in her beloved Waterhouse community with a heartwarming gesture that echoed her commitment to social outreach. On the bright Saturday morning of March 30th, the SFP Pocket Rocket Foundation launched its annual Easter Treat, marking the onset of its community engagement efforts for the year 2024.

With the indomitable Shelly-Ann herself at the forefront, the Foundation embarked on a mission to spread cheer and goodwill. Armed with over $500,000 worth of the quintessential Jamaican Easter fare—bun and cheese—the Mommy Rocket took to the streets of Ashoka Road, beckoning her neighbors to partake in the festivities.

In a display of her down-to-earth demeanor, Shelly-Ann extended a simple yet heartfelt invitation to the community members, urging them to gather at her grandmother's humble abode to receive their Easter treats. The atmosphere buzzed with anticipation as residents eagerly lined up, each clutching their PRF-branded bags in anticipation of the delights within.

The scale of this year's Easter Treat dwarfed its predecessors, a testament to the growing impact of the Foundation's endeavors. Where once a modest gathering of around a hundred souls had been the norm, now over 300 individuals found themselves beneficiaries of Shelly-Ann's generosity.

The significance of this event reverberated throughout Waterhouse, a neighborhood that had long been touched by the benevolent efforts of the Pocket Rocket Foundation. Just a few months prior, the Foundation had celebrated a decade of unwavering dedication to community development with a grand Fundraising Gala. Thanks to the unwavering support of donors, the Foundation had been empowered to expand its reach, ensuring that even more souls could partake in the joyous Easter festivities.

As the day drew to a close and the last bag of bun and cheese found its home, the echoes of laughter and gratitude lingered in the air. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, with her boundless energy and compassionate spirit, had once again exemplified the true essence of Easter—unity, generosity, and the simple joy of giving. In the hearts of the Waterhouse community, her legacy as a champion both on and off the track would forever endure.

Iconic Jamaican sprinter Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce brought some festive cheer to her community of Waterhouse with her second Christmas Treat of the month on Boxing Day and her 16th overall.

Her first treat was held at the Windalco Sports Complex in Ewarton a week earlier.

On Boxing Day, children at the Fesco Field, children in the Waterhouse community were treated to a mixture of toys, rides, food and face painting to name a few.

Sponsors for the treat were Nike, Digicel Jamaica, Grace Foods, XLCR Jamaica and Toyota Jamaica Limited.

“The best Birthday gift I can ever receive is having a successful Treat each year,” said Fraser-Pryce who also celebrated her 37th birthday on Wednesday.

“Nothing more, nothing less. Thank you to our amazing sponsors and volunteers,” added the three-time Olympic and 10-time World Champion.

Fraser-Pryce only competed in five 100m races in 2023 due to a nagging knee injury.

Despite those concerns, she was still able to perform when it counted with 100m bronze at the World Championships in Budapest in August.

Her time (10.77) was a season’s best in her last race of the season.

 

Citizens of the Waterhouse community were treated to an exciting day of football as the SFP Pocket Rocket Foundation Community 6-a-side tournament made its return to after a three-year absence on Saturday at the Fesco Football Field.

Five-time World 100m Champion, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, who grew up in Waterhouse, is putting on the event through her Pocket Rocket Foundation.

“I’m overjoyed because we’ve been absent for three years and to be able to come back this time around to a clean field and new sponsors is such a blessing. I’m grateful for the outpour of support that we’ve had for the competition and we’re looking forward to more support,” Fraser-Pryce told SportsMax.tv.

“We know how many persons in the community have missed the competition so to be able to be back and see the joy from everybody is really wonderful,” she added.

In relation to the turnout on Saturday, Fraser-Pryce couldn’t have been more pleased.

“I feel so good. As you can see, there are so many persons here. I’m grateful to GraceKennedy for bringing the hot-dogs and vita malt because you can’t have a crowd and not have food!”

“I’ve been blessed to have seen the growth of this competition and seen the faces of the kids when they come and watch the football. Otherwise, they’d probably be pre-occupied with other things but I’m glad that I’m able to add another exciting thing to their lives,” added the three-time Olympic champion.

Fraser-Pryce also noted that this year’s competition is extra special due to 2023 being the tenth anniversary of her Pocket Rocket Foundation.

“It’s amazing! Ten years. A decade of difference. I’ve been able to do so much and invest in lives and communities across Jamaica in such a major way. We’ve been able to implement a breakfast program, we’ve given 73 student-athlete scholarships, we’ve seen these student-athletes transition from high school to college and from college to being pilots,” she said.

“It’s incredible for me to see the growth of the foundation and we’re looking forward to continue to fuel more student athletes toward their dreams. We look forward to hosting out gala on November 4 at the AC Hotel and persons who are interested in purchasing tickets can go to our website,” she added.

Petroleum giants Fesco are the title sponsors of this year’s event and they were also able to give out free cooking gas to some members of the community.

“We have established a presence here in Waterhouse and, as again we’re a proudly Jamaican company. Who can you be more proud of in Jamaica than Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and the Pocket Rocket Foundation,” said Fesco Managing Director, Jeremy Barnes.

“I think it’s a marriage made in heaven. Again, we’re a part of this community and we want to reach out to the residents and business community in this area. They have supported us and helped us along our journey as a company and, as such, we have decided to give back to the community,” he added.

As for the action on the field, the first game saw defending champions Legacy being beaten 1-0 by Legend while Trendsetter and Miles United played out a tense 0-0 draw in the second game.

Sunday’s matches saw Medley Mixers defeat Black Strikers 1-0 while Real City beat St. Aubyn 1-0 in the day’s second game.

Monday's games saw Ashoka beat Ballspot 2-1 while Eurotrend vs Dupont Stikers and Moscow vs Lion Den both ended in draws.

 

Global track and field icon Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and her Pocket Rocket Foundation are celebrating 10 years of existence this year and in celebration, and to raise funds to offer even more scholarships to student-athletes in need of financial support, will be staging a fundraising banquet on November 4 that will be streamed on Sportsmax.

The two-time Olympic 100m gold medallist promises that the occasion will be one to remember.

Since its inception in 2013, the foundation has awarded scholarships to 73 student athletes across various sports from 26 schools across Jamaica. They are able to do so through generous backing from companies like GraceKennedy, Digicel and now National Baking Company Foundation, who donated JMD$1,000,000.00 to the foundation at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in Kingston on Tuesday when 11 more student-athletes were awarded scholarships.

Each scholarship recipient, in addition to the JMD$100,000 academic scholarship, will also receive, JMD$7500 NIKE book bag, official Pocket Rocket Foundation notebooks and Promise Pin, a JMD$15,000 Book voucher, a $10,000 GraceKennedy Food Basket and a JMD$25,000 DIGICEL Tablet with JMD$3,000 worth of credit.

Fraser-Pryce explained afterwards that the work is just beginning hence the fundraiser planned for next month.

“For the Pocket Rocket Foundation, we have a lot of visions that we are implementing currently from the Rocket Start Breakfast Programme that we rolled out last year, donating deep freezes and refrigerators to different schools, just to enhance school life,” she remarked.

“What we have coming up is the Pocket Rocket Foundation’s 10th anniversary fundraising gala at the AC Hotel on November 4 when we are looking forward to all that we have been able to accomplish throughout the years as well as implementing a (public-relations) etiquette seminar for students.”

Among the foundation’s future plans is a strategy to prepare high school student-athletes for college by providing them with the tools they need to successfully make the transition thus enhancing the chances of success.

“I think one of the things that is also important for the foundation is college readiness,” said Fraser-Pryce, who has a degree in Child and Adolescent Development from the University of Technology.

“We have a lot of athletes that are here from different sports and a lot of them will need help in transitioning because it is not as easy as it seems. It definitely takes a while to transition and some of the things we want also want to be able to offer them is mental health support because for a lot of persons there are different ways that they cope and I want to assist as best as possible, helping them to cope. It’s not just about giving them cash and kind but it is to be readily available to cater to different needs that we don’t know of or money can’t buy.”

These are among the reasons why the five-time World 100m champion will be asking patrons of the gala to make the sacrifice and turn out for the occasion because every dollar raised will go towards building these student-athletes into productive citizens of Jamaica.

“How it works is that you just empty your bank account, give it us and we can continue to invest in student-athletes,” she said breaking out into laughter.

“The ticket costs USD$350 and also, as a company, you can be a sponsor of the gala and you can have a table for your company to have up to 10 persons to attend. We’ll have items for auction and raffle items,” she said.

“Sportsmax will also be there to live-stream the event so wherever you are in the world you will be able to participate. It will be a night of excellence.”

After a grueling season battling injury while facing the fastest women on the planet, Jamaican track icon star Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce took some time to enjoy some of the finer things in life at the Bottega Veneta fashion show during the Milan Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2024 in Milan, Italy on Saturday.

The two-time Olympic 100m champion, known for her colourful wigs and trendsetting couture, was among a galaxy of celebrities gathered for the occasion that included writer, fashion editor, and New York Times best-selling author Derek Blasberg, Erykah Badu as well as Sabato de Samo, Gucci’s new Head of Creative.

The five-time world 100m champion is still recovering from a hamstring injury sustained at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest in August as well as a longstanding knee injury that significantly impacted her preparation last season. But what better way is there to heal the body and soul than immersing one’s self in the world of high fashion.

Normally at 36-years-old, Track & Field athletes are way past their prime and getting ready to walk away from the sport.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, however, is not normal.

The three-time Olympic Champion is coming off the best season of her career and, quite possibly, the best individual season any sprinter, male or female, has had in the history of the sport.

The Jamaican won 11 out of the 12 100m races she competed in and her times were as follows: 10.67, 10.67, 10.70, 10.87, 10.93, 10.67, 10.66, 10.67, 10.62, 10.74 and 10.65. The third 10.67 performance was done to win her fifth World Championship title at the Eugene World Championships last July where she also ran 21.81 for 200m silver.

For her exploits, the legendary sprinter was named the Laureus Sportswoman of the Year at the prestigious 2023 Laureus Sports Awards in Paris in May.

With all that in mind, why would someone want to walk away from a sport at their best because of age?

Fraser-Pryce has that same question.

“Ageism is something that we should talk about because I hate the fact that a basketball player or a football player can play sport at 40, a Nascar driver or an F1 driver is 42 or 50 and he gets to continue but why can’t I continue?” Fraser-Pryce said in an interview with Athletics Weekly.

“It’s my job and as long as I’m showing up healthy, I’m going to re-write the books and I’m excited about that,” she added.

Fraser-Pryce says she hopes to keep inspiring athletes of all generations by showing them that anyone, no matter your age, can achieve great things if they put their mind to it.

“I’m hoping that I can continue not just to inspire other athletes but myself because my coach tells me every day ‘you know you’re 36, right?’ and I’m like ‘yeah that’s crazy!’ Gone are the days where, at 36, most athletes would have been retired at home doing something else at home,” she said.

“I still feel good; I still feel hungry and it’s just amazing to see what I’ve been able to accomplish over the years and the body of work. I think, at this stage, it’s really about impact and showing female athletes, or athletes overall, what you can do if you really have that conviction, and, the things that we tell ourselves, if we continue to work at that then greatness is possible from that. For me, it’s getting up every morning feeling rejuvenated; still feeling like there is something I’m chasing that is right there and I’m almost touching it, I just need a little more push,” Fraser-Pryce added.

She is currently recovering from a knee injury she sustained just a day before she was set to open her season at the Kip Keino Classic in Nairobi on May 13.

 

 

 

 

Five-time World 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will contest the 100m at the Kip Keino Classic at the Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, Kenya on May 13th.

On April 29th, Fraser-Pryce will open her season at the Botswana Golden Grand Prix before, two weeks later, returning to the meet where, last year, she opened her season with a blistering 10.67.

That race started a phenomenal season for the three-time Olympic champion which saw her produce a record seven times faster than 10.70 including 10.67 to win her fifth World 100m title in Eugene in July.

Seven-time Olympic medallist Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce says the 2024 Olympics in Paris will be her last.

The 36-year-old, who won back-to-back 100m gold medals in Beijing in 2008 and London in 2012, made the declaration in an interview with NBC Sports.

“Yes, 2024 will definitely be my last Olympics,” said Fraser-Pryce before going into how her foundation will become her priority once she exits the track.

“As I chase world championship and Olympic glory, the legacy that I leave off the track is important and my Pocket Rocket Foundation has been near and dear to me. We’ve been trying to expand on what we do here in Jamaica and hopefully go regional. Being able to run fast and win medals is great, but using that platform to give young people the chance to succeed and balance education with sports and transcend their own thoughts and ideas is what I’m passionate about as well,” she added.

By the time the Paris Olympics roll around, Fraser-Pryce will be 37 and aiming to become the oldest Olympic 100m gold medallist ever, male or female.

“I definitely want 2024 to be my last hurrah. I’ve accomplished so much, and I’m so, so grateful for it all. All the people that I’ve been able to touch, all the memories that I’ve made. After the Olympics I want to make different memories,” she said.

The 2024 Paris Olympics are scheduled for July 26-August 24 with Track & Field scheduled for August 1-11.

Jamaica’s five-time World 100m Champion Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce says breaking the 100m World Record remains one of her goals as she enters the twilight of her career.

The 36-year-old has a personal best of 10.60 set at the Lausanne Diamond League in 2021 and is coming off a remarkable 2022 season that saw her run below 10.7 a record seven times, including a 10.67 to win her fifth World Championships gold medal in Eugene in July.

“I want to run 10.5 or 10.4. I’m working towards that, but I also don’t want it to be the end-all, be-all,” the three-time Olympic gold medallist said in an interview with NBC Sports.

“I’ll be satisfied knowing that I gave 100% towards that effort. Being able to push myself beyond something that a lot of people think is impossible has given me wings beneath my feet. I don’t want to limit myself. I want to think about potential and where I can go with that,” Fraser-Pryce added.

The Women’s 100m World Record currently stands at 10.49 set by American Florence Griffith-Joyner at the US Olympic Trials all the way back in 1988.

Since then, only Fraser-Pryce’s countrywoman, five-time Olympic gold medallist Elaine Thompson-Herah, has run below 10.6 when she clocked 10.54 to win at the Prefontaine Classic in 2021.

 

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Rasheed Broadbell were crowned as Jamaica’s National Sportswoman and Sportsman of the Year, respectively, at the 2022 RJRGLEANER Sports Foundation National Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Awards on Friday at the Jamaica Pegasus hotel.

The 35-year-old Fraser-Pryce, now a five-time National Sportswoman of the year after wins in 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2019 previously, produced an outstanding year in which she won her fifth 100m title at the World Athletics Championships in July, in Eugene, Oregon, leading a Jamaican sweep of the podium places with Jackson finishing second in a personal best 10.73 seconds and Elaine Thompson-Herah third in 10.81 seconds.

Fraser-Pryce was also the Diamond League 100m champion in 2022 and ran a world-leading 10.62 seconds among her record seven sub-10.70 100m races during the season.

Meanwhile, Broadbell enjoyed an excellent breakout season in which he ran 13.08 seconds to win 110m hurdles gold at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham and enjoyed some strong Diamond League performances, including a personal best time of 12.99 seconds while defeating American World and Olympic champion Grant Holloway of the USA at the Lausanne Diamond League meet in August, before finishing second to Holloway at the finale in Zurich the following month.

World 200m champion Shericka Jackson and West Indies all-rounder Rovman Powell, who led the Jamaica Tallawahs to their third Caribbean Premier League T20 title and Jamaica Scorpions to their first Super 50 title in 10 years, were the respective runners-up.

 

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