Arkansas senior Romaine Beckford successfully defended his NCAA Division I Outdoor high jump title on day three of the NCAA Championships at Hayward Field in Eugene on Friday.

The 21-year-old cleared a height of 2.26m on his second attempt to add to his gold medal at the NCAA Indoor Championships in March.

The reigning Jamaican national champion also had three unsuccessful attempts at 2.33m, a jump that would’ve secured a personal best and the Olympic qualifying standard.

Nebraska junior Tyus Wilson was second with 2.23m while Arkansas-Pine Bluff senior Caleb Snowden was third with a similar height.

Jamaican USC freshman Racquil Broderick produced 61.77m to finish second in the men’s discus behind South Alabama senior Francois Prinsloo (63.51m).

Kansas junior Dimitrios Pavlidis was third with 60.97m.

The men’s 400m final saw Jamaican Florida senior Jevaughn Powell produce a big personal best 44.54 to finish third behind Georgia sophomore Christopher Morales Williams (44.47) and Alabama freshman Samuel Ogazi (44.52).

Jamaican Clemson senior Tarees Rhoden was also in personal best form with 1:45.70 for fourth in the 800m final behind Virginia senior Shane Cohen (1:44.97), Texas A&M junior Sam Whitmarsh (1:45.10) and Iowa State junior Finley McLear (1:45.66).

 

Brianna Lyston secured a chance at the sprint double at the SEC Outdoor Championships in Gainesville, Florida after booking her spot in the final of the women’s 100m.

The LSU sophomore, who ran 22.31 on Thursday to secure her spot in the 200m final, came back a day later to run 11.09 to be the joint-fastest qualifier for Saturday’s final alongside collegiate leader Jacious Sears of Tennessee.

Bahamian Florida junior Wanya McCoy and Jamaican Georgia freshman Jehlani Gordon advanced to the men’s 100m final as the second and ninth fastest qualifiers with 10.09 and 10.17, respectively.

The women’s 400m prelims saw Arkansas senior Nickisha Pryce become the eighth-fastest Jamaican ever in the event.

Pryce, who is Jamaica’s reigning national champion, ran a personal best and collegiate leading 49.72 to advance to the final as the fastest qualifier ahead of teammate Kaylyn Brown who ran 49.86.

LSU sophomore Jahiem Stern produced 13.45 to advance to the final of the 110m hurdles.

In the field, the Jamaican Arkansas pair of Romaine Beckford and Wayne Pinnock won gold in the high jump and long jump, respectively.

Beckford had a best clearance of 2.22m to win ahead of LSU’s Kuda Chadenga (2.19m) and Ole Miss’s Arvesta Troupe (2.14m).

Pinnock, a sliver medalist at last year’s World Championships in Budapest, jumped 8.09m to successfully defend his SEC title.

Georgia’s Micah Larry produced 7.80m for second while Florida’s Caleb Foster was third with the same distance.

 

 

A pair of Jamaica’s representatives at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Wayne Pinnock and Ackera Nugent, were among a number of Caribbean winners at Saturday’s LSU Invitational in Baton Rouge.

Pinnock, who took long jump silver in Budapest, produced a wind-aided 8.44m (5.8 m/s) to claim victory in his first outdoor competition this season.

The 23-year-old Arkansas star, who won gold at both the SEC and NCAA Indoor Championships earlier this year, opened his competition with 8.15m in the first round before producing his winning distance in the second.

He had one more jump in the third round (8.25m) before passing on his final three attempts.

Florida State’s Curtis Williams was second with 7.99m while Florida’s Malcolm Clemons was third with 7.94m. Another Jamaican, Florida State’s Jordan Turner, produced 7.84m for fourth.

The women’s long jump was won by Bahamian Florida sophomore Anthaya Charlton with a best jump of 6.74m. Arkansas’s Nia Robinson was second with 6.70m while Georgia Tech’s Ameia Wilson was third with 6.56m.

In her fourth 100m hurdles race of the young season, Ackera Nugent, who was fifth in the final in Budapest, produced 12.57 to take victory ahead of Canada’s Mariam Abdul-Rashid (12.69) and LSU’s Leah Phillips (12.71).

Nugent’s season’s best, which currently stands at 12.52, was done in a fourth-place finish at the Tom Jones Invitational on April 13.

Arkansas also prevailed in the men’s high jump through another member of Jamaica’s team at last year’s World Championships, Romaine Beckford.

Beckford, the reigning NCAA indoor and outdoor and Jamaican national champion, had a best jump of 2.23m to win ahead of Georgia’s Riyon Rankin (2.20m) and his Arkansas teammate Kason O’Riley (2.20m).

Guyana’s Natricia Hooper produced 13.92m to win the women’s triple jump ahead of Mylana Hearn (13.78m) and LSU’s Morgan Smalls (13.17m).

Arkansas’s Apalos Edwards jumped 16.43m for second in the men’s equivalent won by Air Houston’s Chris Carter (16.70m). Florida State’s Kyvon Tatham jumped 16.00m for third.

The women’s 400m saw Vincentian 800m record holder Shafiqua Maloney and reigning Jamaican national champion and Arkansas star Nickisha Pryce run 51.29 and 51.35 for second and third, respectively, behind American Alexis Holmes who ran 50.80 to win.

Jamaica’s Lashanna Graham ran 58.16 for third in the women’s 400m hurdles behind American Anna Cockrell (54.74) and Georgia’s Dominique Mustin (56.52).

Florida’s Jevaughn Powell ran 20.28 to take second in the men’s 200m behind Arkansas’s Makanakaishe Charamba who won in 20.11. Arkansas’s Lance Lang ran 20.36 in third.

Powell also represented Jamaica in Budapest, running in the heats of the 4x400m relay.

 

 

Commonwealth Games gold medallist Lamara Distin added another award to her growing trophy cabinet by being named at the Texas A&M Female Athlete of the Year at the school’s annual Legacy Awards on Monday.

The Legacy Awards recognize Texas A&M student-athletes’ accomplishments for various academic, service, leadership and athletic endeavors from March 2023 to March 2024.

Distin, a two-time Jamaican national champion, dominated the SEC and NCAA high jump scene by adding a pair of SEC titles at the 2023 Outdoor and 2024 Indoor Championships, bringing her career total to five SEC high jump titles.

She logged a pair of runner-up finishes at the 2023 outdoor and 2024 indoor national championships, garnering her fifth and sixth First-Team All-America honors.

At the 2024 SEC Indoor Championships, the 24-year-old broke the NCAA Indoor high jump record clearing 2.00m, becoming the first collegiate woman to clear the 2.00m mark indoor or outdoor.

Jamaican Southern Miss junior Zayne Palomino secured his third win of the season in the high jump with victory at the Crimson Tide Invitational at the Sam Bailey Stadium in Alabama on Saturday.

Palomino entered the competition with a first-time clearance of 2.05m before clearing 2.10m on his second attempt.

He then needed three attempts to clear 2.14m before eventually clearing 2.17m, his winning height, on his second attempt. Palomino then had three unsuccessful efforts to clear 2.20m, his personal best which he did to win at the Sun Belt Indoor Championships on February 20.

Corvell Todd and Jacob Patten both cleared 2.10m for second and third.

Barton County Community College sophomore Christopher Young was also a winner on Saturday, producing 18.57m for top spot in the men’s shot put.

Memphis sophomore Sascha Schmidt threw 18.43m in second while Southern Miss sophomore Piers Cameron threw 17.95m for third.

On the track, Florida State sophomore Shenese Walker won the women’s 200m in 23.20 ahead of teammate Kaniya Johnson (23.62) and Southern Miss senior Kenia Seals (23.65).

The Bahamas had an excellent start to Monday's day three of the 51st Carifta Games at the Kirani James Stadium in Grenada thanks to a dominant showing in the Under-17 Girls javelin throw.

Dior-Rae Scott, who won gold in Kingston in 2022 and silver last year in Nassau, returned to the top of the podium with an excellent new personal best and Carifta record 52.53m with her third-round effort.

Her teammate, Kamera Strachan, had a best throw of 47.61m for silver while Jamaica’s Zoelle Jamel was third with 45.00m.

The Girls Under-20 high jump also saw a quinella, with Jamaica enjoying their own 1-2 finish this time around.

Rasheda Samuels secured gold with a third-time clearance of 1.78m while her teammate Dejanea Bruce took silver with a best clearance of 1.76m.

Trinidad & Tobago’s Keneisha Shelbourne was third with 1.70m.

In the Under-20 Girls long jump, Trinidad & Tobago’s reigning NACAC U-18 champion Janae De Gannes produced one of the performances of the meet with a massive personal best 6.50m to win gold.

De Gannes only produced two legal jumps throughout her series, 6.50m in the first round and 6.40m in the second round.

Her mark also broke the Carifta U-20 record of 6.48m done in 2016 by Guadeloupe’s Yanis David.

Jamaica’s Rohanna Sudlow was second with 6.30m while Bahamian Lanaisha Lubin was third with 5.90m.

For Christof Bryan, the path back to the top of the high jump podium has been paved with obstacles, setbacks, and moments of doubt. Yet, through it all, he found the unwavering support and encouragement of his parents, Christopher and Carmen Bryan, who played an instrumental role in reigniting his passion for the sport after years of injury-induced hiatus.

Bryan, 27, a former standout at Wolmer's High School and Kansas State University, faced numerous challenges on his journey, including multiple knee surgeries and frustrating periods of rehabilitation that led him to walk away from the sport a few years ago. However, the indomitable spirit instilled in him by his parents, coupled with his own determination, eventually propelled him back onto the track and into the high jump pit.

Last Saturday's victory at the GC Foster Classic, where Bryan soared to a height of 2.20m despite the challenging circumstances of fading light, served as a testament to his resilience and steely focus on his goal of qualifying for the Olympic Games in Paris this summer.

Despite the late start and dimming visibility, Bryan remained undeterred, channeling his determination into a performance that left him pleased with his progress.

Reflecting on his journey and the challenges he has overcome, Bryan expressed gratitude for the  support of his parents, who were instrumental in encouraging him to return to the sport he loves.

"My mom and dad, Christopher, Carmen Bryan. They were the ones that encouraged me to come back," he acknowledged. "I won't even lie to you. The only reason why I'm here back in Jamaica is my parents. They were the ones that encouraged me to come back. My dad even reached out to MVP before I even knew about it and they said 'yeah man, come' and it's been good. I enjoy being in the camp. I mean, it's hard, but I enjoy the grind of it."

Bryan's resurgence in the high jump arena has been marked by significant milestones, including a season-best jump of 2.25m at the Gibson McCook Relays, his best performance in almost a decade. With his sights set on the Olympic standard of 2.33m, Bryan remains focused on taking each step of his comeback journey one at a time, acknowledging the challenges ahead while embracing the opportunity to continue climbing towards his goals.

As he navigates the highs and lows of his athletic pursuit, Bryan finds solace in the support of his family and the satisfaction of knowing that he is relentless in the pursuit of his passion. "Once I start something, I want to try to complete it," he affirmed. "I've put in too much time and effort into it, so I'm going through with it."

 

 

Louisiana State University (LSU) Sophomore Brianna Lyston gave fans a signal of what is to come from her this season with a personal best and collegiate leading 7.07 to win the women’s 60m at the Razorback Invitational at the Tyson Center in Fayetteville on Saturday.

The 19-year-old, who entered the meet with a personal best of 7.29 done last season, first produced an easy 7.14 in qualifying before returning to run her new personal best in the final to win comfortably ahead of Georgia’s Kaila Jackson (7.20) and Florida’s Grace Stark (7.21).

Lyston’s time is the third-fastest in the world this year, fourth-fastest in collegiate history and equals the LSU school record done back in 2018 by Aleia Hobbs.

The men's equivalent saw USC's Travis Williams run 6.63 for third behind LSU's Myles Thomas (6.62) and USC's JC Stevenson (6.61).

Jamaican World Championship 4x400m relay medallist Stacey Ann Williams ran 51.86 to win the women’s open 400m ahead of Americans Kendall Ellis (52.12) and Bailey Lear (52.49). World Championships 400m hurdles finalist Andrenette Knight ran 52.53 for fifth.

Arkansas Junior and reigning Jamaican National champion Nickisha Pryce ran 51.58 for third in the college women’s 400m behind schoolmate Amber Anning (50.56) and Georgia’s Aaliyah Butler (51.34).

Pryce was a semi-finalist in the 400m at the World Championships in Budapest last August.

Florida Senior Jevaughn Powell ran 46.28 for third in the college men’s 400m behind USC’s William Jones (45.24) and Texas A&M’s Auhmad Robinson (46.15).

2023 NCAA Indoor and Outdoor champion and World Championship 100m hurdles finalist Ackera Nugent ran 7.94 for second in the women’s open 60m hurdles won by the USA’s Tia Jones in 7.85. Christina Clemons ran 7.95 for third.

Jamaica’s Phillip Lemonious, who won the NCAA Outdoor title competing for the University of Arkansas last season, ran 7.68 for third in the men’s 60m hurdles. Interestingly, the top two finishers in the race, Texas A&M’s Connor Schulman and Jaqualon Scott, also ran 7.68. Their times when rounded up to the thousandths were 7.672, 7.673 and 7.675.

St. Vincent's Shafiqua Maloney ran 2:02.29 to take top spot in the women's 800m ahead of Sanu Jallow of Arkansas (2:02.60) and Gabija Galvydyte (2:02.82).

In the field, Arkansas high jumper Romaine Beckford, the defending NCAA Indoor and Outdoor champion, improved his indoor career best to 2.27m with his victory on Friday evening.

The winning height moves Beckford to No. 4 on the UA all-time list and No. 3 on the Jamaican all-time indoor list with the equal No. 4 performance.

Having won the competition, Beckford opted for the Olympic standard of 2.33m as his next height and had three attempts with his last try coming closest to clearing.

Mississippi State’s Sherman Hawkins and USC’s Elias Gerald both cleared 2.17m for second and third, respectively.

Elsewhere in the field, Jamaican Oklahoma Junior Nikaoli Williams produced 7.86m for second in the men’s long jump behind Florida’s Malcolm Clemons (8.06m). Clemons’ teammate Caleb Foster jumped 7.68m for third.

 

 

Reigning National high jump champion Romaine Beckford was victorious in his first meet as an Arkansas Razorback.

The former South Plains College and University of South Florida standout was locked in a tense battle with teammate Kason O’Riley before eventually winning the event with a 2.19m clearance on a short, four-step approach. 

Beckford trailed teammate Kason O’Riley when both cleared 2.16m, as O’Riley navigated the previous height of 2.11m on a first attempt while Beckford needed three tries before clearing. 

A third attempt clearance at 2.19m earned Beckford the victory as three missed attempts at 2.22m followed.

Beckford then saluted the encouraging crowd of 1,418 with his signature backflip on the high jump mat. 

Following the 1-2 Arkansas finish in the high jump, Razorback Tomas Ferrari placed fifth with a 6-7 (2.01) clearance.

Beckford won last year’s NCAA Outdoor title with a 2.27m clearance while competing for USF.

He then won the National title with 2.23m and the NACAC U-23 title with 2.21m.

The 21-year-old also competed at the World Championships in Budapest, finishing 11th in his qualifying group with a best clearance of 2.22m.

 

 

The Wanda Diamond League has released a detailed summary of which disciplines will be staged at which meetings during the 2024 season.

In 2024, the world’s best athletes will once again take the stage in athletics’ premier one-day series, competing at 15 meetings across four different continents.

Athletes will compete for points in their chosen discipline at the 14 series meetings between April and September, with the most successful qualifying for the Wanda Diamond League Final in Brussels on September 13th-14th.

The season begins in Xiamen on April 20th, with the men’s 100m, women’s 200m and a 100/110m hurdles double bill among the headline events. Each discipline will then be staged at least four and up to eight times on the Road to the Final, giving athletes from across the globe enough opportunities to earn points.

Two meetings will be held at a different location in 2024 due to stadium renovation works in their usual locations. The Meeting International Mohammed VI will move from Rabat to Marrakech, while the Wanda Diamond League Shanghai will take place in Suzhou.

The 14 series meetings will each take place in a two-hour TV world programme and will all stage at least 14 Diamond Disciplines. The Wanda Diamond League Final in Brussels will be the only meeting to feature every single discipline, with all 32 Diamond League champions crowned over the course of two days.

The season calendar and the allocation of disciplines remain subject to change.

A list of disciplines for each meeting will also be available under the 'programme and results' page on each individual meeting website.

As well as the Diamond Disciplines, each meeting may also include additional disciplines in their programme, in which athletes will not earn points on the Road to the Final.

The disciplines are as follows: 100m (M,W), 200m (M,W), 400m (M,W), 800m (M,W), 1500m/Mile (M,W), 3000m/5000m (M,W), 3000m Steeplechase (M,W), 110m Hurdles (M), 100m Hurdles (W), 400m Hurdles (M,W), High Jump (M,W), Pole Vault (M,W), Long Jump (M,W), Triple Jump (M,W), Shot Put (M,W), Discus Throw (M,W), Javelin Throw (M,W).

39-year-old Donald Thomas once again proved that age is just a number after securing bronze in the men’s high jump at the Pan American Games in Santiago, Chile on Friday.

The 2007 World Champion had a best clearance of 2.24m, the same height as silver medallist Luis Joel Castro of Puerto Rico.

Cuba’s Luis Enrique Zayas took gold with 2.27m.

Jamaica’s Lushane Wilson and Cristoff Bryan were seventh and 10th with best clearances of 2.21m and 2.15m, respectively.

Jamaica picked up a silver medal on the final day of competition at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Sunday.

Jamaica’s team of Candice McLeod, Janieve Russell, Nickisha Pryce and Stacey-Ann Williams, ran bravely and led for much of the race before Femke Bol got by Williams five metres out from the finish line to win gold in 3:20.72.

Jamaica clocked 3:20.88 while Great Britain was third in 3:21.04. This medal was Jamaica’s 12th of the championships.

Their men were expected to contend for a medal in the 4x400m relay but they were run out of it and finished fourth in a season-best 2:59.34.

The USA won gold in a world-leading time of 2:57.31. France ran a national record 2:58.45 for the silver medal with Great Britain taking bronze having run 2:58.71, a season’s best time.

Meanwhile, Lamara Distin finished fifth in the high jump competition. Having cleared 1.94m to put herself in the hunt for medals, Distin failed in her three attempts at 1.97m and bowed out of the competition.

Yaroslava Mahuchikh of the Ukraine took gold with a clearance of 2:01 with Australia’s Eleanor Patterson taking the silver with 1.99m.

Patterson’s teammate Nicola Olyslagers claimed the bronze with 1.99m.

Morgan Lake of Great Britain was fourth having cleared 1.97.

Jamaica with 12 medals – three gold, five silver and four bronze medals – finished fourth at the championships.

 

Jamaica’s Lamara Distin advanced from the qualifying round of the Women’s high jump competition on Friday. However, her teammate Kimberly Williamson was eliminated.

The 23-year-old Commonwealth Games champion, who has been slightly off her best form this season, cleared 1.92m to advance from Group A along with medal favourite Yaroslava Mahuchikh of the Ukraine. Distin began jumping at a height of 1.80 and had a miss at 1.89m. She eventually cleared that height and then soared over 1.92m.

American Vashti Cunningham advanced from Group B alongside Australia’s medal prospect Nicola Olyslagers and Urkaine’s Iryna Geranshcenko.

Williamson’s best effort was 1.85m, which despite being a season’s best performance, was not good enough to see her advance.

Texas A&M’s Lamara Distin won her second Jamaican high jump title on day one of the JAAA/Puma National Senior and Junior Athletics Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston on Thursday.

The reigning Commonwealth Games champion’s best clearance was a height of 1.91m, the same height she cleared to win the NCAA Indoor title in March. Distin also took silver at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in June with 1.87m.

Kimberley Williamson, a seven-time national champion, was second with a best clearance of 1.85m.

Arkansas’s Jaydon Hibbert and Roje Stona as well as Texas A&M’s Lamara Distin all secured wins on the third and final day of the 2023 SEC Outdoor Championships at LSU on Saturday.

The 18-year-old Hibbert was easily the star of the day. The 2022 World Junior Champion produced an incredible personal best of 17.87m to take the Men’s triple jump crown ahead of Arkansas teammate Ryan Brown (16.43m) and Alabama's Christian Edwards (16.22m).

Hibbert opened the competition with a 17.02m effort before throwing down the biggest jump of his career so far in the second round. As he has done for most of the season to preserve his legs, he passed on his next four attempts.

Hibbert’s mark is also a new collegiate record, world lead and world junior record and puts him in a three-way tie for 13th on the all-time list.

Earlier in the day, Stona, also of Arkansas, produced a personal best 68.64m, the second furthest throw in collegiate history, to win the Men’s discus ahead of teammate and countryman Ralford Mullings (62.00) and Alabama’s Alan de Falchi (61.82m).

Distin continued her unbeaten run in the high jump this season with a 1.91m clearance to win ahead of Georgia’s Elena Kulichenko (1.88m) and Tennessee’s Cheyla Scott (1.85m).

On the track, Arkansas’s Ackera Nugent ran a personal best 12.43 for second in the Women’s 100m hurdles behind LSU’s Alia Armstrong’s 12.40. Kentucky’s Masai Russell was third in 12.47.

Another Jamaican Arkansas athlete, Phillip Lemonious, was second in the Men’s 110m hurdles in 13.63 behind Tennessee’s Devon Brooks (13.53). Another Tennessee athlete, Cayman’s Rasheem Brown, was third in 13.64.

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