US Open boss Stacey Allaster said it was "very unfortunate" that Novak Djokovic would have to miss the upcoming grand slam.

Shortly before the draw announcement, it was confirmed that three-time Flushing Meadows champion Djokovic would be absent.

His stance on refusing a COVID-19 vaccination meant he would be prevented from entering the United States, denying the 35-year-old another shot at glory in New York.

Tournament director Allaster said: "Novak is a great champion and it is very unfortunate that he will be unable to compete at the 2022 US Open, as he is unable to enter the country due to the federal government's vaccination policy for non-US citizens.

"We look forward to welcoming Novak back at the 2023 US Open."

The tournament begins on Monday, with Russian Daniil Medvedev defending the title he secured by beating Djokovic in last year's final, when entry requirements to the US were not so restrictive.

Serbian Djokovic has won 21 grand slam titles, one fewer than Rafael Nadal who has already arrived in the Big Apple ahead of the final major of the year.

Nadal moved ahead of Djokovic and clear at the top of the men's all-time list by winning the Australian Open and French Open titles this year, before having to withdraw from a Wimbledon semi-final against Nick Kyrgios because of an abdominal tear.

Djokovic was not allowed to play at the Australian Open at the start of the year, when issues surrounding his visa ended with him being deported from Melbourne on public health grounds due to not taking the vaccine.

Novak Djokovic will play no part in the US Open, the second grand slam he will have missed this year because of his stance on refusing a COVID-19 vaccination.

The Wimbledon champion announced on Thursday, shortly before the draw in New York, that he would not be making the trip to Flushing Meadows.

He posted on social media: "Sadly, I will not be able to travel to NY this time for US Open."

The 35-year-old Serbian, who has won 21 grand slam titles, added: "Good luck to my fellow players! I’ll keep in good shape and positive spirit and wait for an opportunity to compete again. See you soon tennis world!"

Djokovic, who lost to Daniil Medvedev in last year's final in New York, had his route to the United States blocked by red tape this time around.

US authorities are refusing to allow unvaccinated foreign visitors to enter the country. Djokovic, a three-time US Open winner, has been steadfast on his position regarding the vaccine.

The United States Tennis Association (USTA) pledged to adhere to government rulings surrounding coronavirus protocols, despite including Djokovic on the US Open entry list last month.

However, he had first to be allowed to enter the country before he could consider competing, and that was out of the USTA's hands.

In late July, Djokovic said he was "preparing as if I will be allowed to compete"; however, he was unable to travel for the build-up tournaments, and now he will miss the major too.

"Thank you #NoleFam for your messages of love and support," he told his fans on Thursday.

Djokovic was not allowed to play at the Australian Open at the start of the year, when issues surrounding his visa ended with him being deported from Melbourne on public health grounds due to not taking the vaccine.

American great John McEnroe said it was "a joke" that Djokovic should have to miss the US Open too, and called for a solution to be found, but that has not come about.

The current entry rules for international travellers to the United States were not in place when Djokovic was toppled by Medvedev in last year's men's singles final, the result that ended his hopes of a calendar Grand Slam.

Top overall seed at the Winston Salem Open, Grigor Dimitrov, won the first set of his opening match against Dominic Thiem 6-0 before being forced to retire due to illness symptoms while trailing 4-2 in the second.

The first set was total domination from the Bulgarian, winning 80 per cent (12-of-15) of the points against Thiem's serve as he breezed through the opening frame in 25 minutes, but after experiencing dizziness and shortness of breath in the second set, he decided to pull the plug on his match after a visit from the doctor.

Thiem will play England's Jack Draper in the next round after he was too strong down the stretch for Italy's Fabio Fognini, winning 6-2 4-6 6-1.

Meanwhile, it was relatively smoother sailing for second second Botic van de Zandschulp in his all-Dutch matchup against Tallon Griekspoor, converting both of his two break point opportunities to win 7-6 (7-5) 6-3.

Earlier in the day, in-form Belarusian and 11th seed Ilya Ivashka used his powerful serve to overwhelm Germany's Peter Gojowczyk 6-4 6-2. 

Ivashka will meet Switzerland's Marc-Andrea Huesler next after the world number 102 passed a stiff test against Sweden's Mikael Ymer, with his 6-4 6-4 win likely elevating him into the top-100 when the next rankings are released.

Richard Gasquet at 36 years young upset 20-year-old Italian Lorenzo Musetti 7-6 (7-5) 4-6 6-1, and he will play Steve Johnson next after the big American defeated Spain's Pedro Martinez 7-6 (7-2) 6-2.

Serbia's Laslo Djere needed almost three hours to get the better of Portugal's Joao Sousa 4-6 6-3 7-6 (7-5), and Djere will play Australia's Jason Kubler after he handled South Korea's Kwon Soon-woo 7-5 6-2.

The other two Aussies in action were less successful, as John Millman fell 6-4 6-4 to Spain's Albert Ramos-Vinolas, and James Duckworth went down 6-3 6-3 against Maxime Cressy.

Finland's rising star Emil Ruusuvuori was disappointing in his 6-4 6-1 loss to France's Adrian Mannarino, and fellow Frenchman Benjamin Bonzi also got the job done against England's Kyle Edmund 6-4 7-6 (7-5).

In the late session, 15th seed Jaume Munar defeated Tseng Chun-hsin 6-3 6-4, and in the last match of the night, Lorenzo Sonego beat Alejandro Tabilo 7-5 6-1.

John McEnroe has called Novak Djokovic's potential absence from the US Open over his vaccination status a "joke".

The United States does not currently allow those who have not received the COVID-19 jab into the country, putting the unvaccinated Djokovic in real danger of missing this year's edition of the tournament he has won three times.

The Serb has already missed the Australian Open this year because of his lack of vaccination, while also missing tournaments at Indian Wells in California, as well as the Rogers Cup in Canada.

He did however win his 21st Grand Slam at Wimbledon earlier this year, and McEnroe believes Djokovic should be allowed to play at Flushing Meadows as he chases down Rafael Nadal for the most Grand Slam titles in history.

Ahead of the tournament in New York, McEnroe told reporters: "No, I don't think it's fair. I think it's a joke.

"I would have had the vaccine and gone and played but he's got very strong beliefs and you have to respect that. 

"At this point, in the pandemic, we're two and a half years in, I think people in all parts of the world know more about it, and the idea that he can’t travel here to play, to me is a joke."

On whether Djokovic's decision not to get the vaccine could affect his competition with Nadal and Roger Federer to become the most decorated male player ever, McEnroe replied: "That's the question that we all want to know the answer to.

"Obviously, Rafa Nadal has benefited from that. These three guys are already above everyone else. So, it makes it extremely interesting to see these two go at it and then you think of Roger Federer but he's been hurt for a while."

However, McEnroe believes Djokovic can overcome his vaccination status to win more titles, adding: "Who's to say [Djokovic] can't do it for another couple of years?

"Let's say that he wins three or four more. That's not impossible, by any means. Despite this, he can still get to 25. I think it's made it more complicated to do it because that has to wear on you mentally.

"Training this past month or six weeks not knowing whether he's going to play, that's going to put a strain on you mentally just as it was when he got thrown out of Australia. I think it took him three, four months to get his head right."

A spectator at the Wimbledon final who Nick Kyrgios accused of looking like she had consumed "about 700 drinks" is taking legal action against the Australian.

Polish lawyer Anna Palus was temporarily ejected from Centre Court last month after Kyrgios claimed she was drunk and putting him off during his defeat to Novak Djokovic.

He said to the chair umpire between points: "She's drunk out of her mind in the first row.

"The one who looks like she's had about 700 drinks talking to me in every single point."

Ms Palus has instructed her solicitors, Brett Wilson LLP, to start defamation proceedings against the 27-year-old and she is prepared to take the case to the High Court if there is no "prompt resolution" to the matter.

She said in a statement released by solicitors Brett Wilson LLP: "On Sunday 10 July 2022 I attended the final of the Wimbledon tennis championships with my mother.

"It was an event we had been looking forward to for some time. During the course of the final, Nick Kyrgios made a reckless and entirely baseless allegation against me. 

"Not only did this cause considerable harm on the day, resulting in my temporary removal from the arena, but Mr Kyrgios's false allegation was broadcast to, and read by, millions around the world, causing me and my family very substantial damage and distress.

"I am not litigious, but after much consideration, I have concluded that I have no alternative but to instruct my solicitors Brett Wilson LLP to bring defamation proceedings against Mr Kyrgios in order to clear my name.

"The need to obtain vindication, and to prevent a repetition of the allegation, are the only reasons for taking legal action. Any damages recovered will be donated to charity.

"Given the extant claim, I am unable to comment further on the events of the day in question. I hope that Mr Kyrgios will reflect on the harm he has caused me and my family and offer a prompt resolution to this matter. However, if he is unwilling to do this, I am committed to obtaining vindication in the High Court."

The clock is ticking on Novak Djokovic's prospects of playing at the US Open, two days out from the draw at Flushing Meadows.

Wimbledon champion Djokovic, who lost to Daniil Medvedev in last year's final in New York, has his route to the United States blocked by red tape at present.

US authorities are refusing to allow unvaccinated foreign visitors to enter the country, and barring a change of policy on that front, his hopes appear forlorn. Djokovic, a three-time US Open champion, has refused to accept any COVID-19 vaccine.

The United States Tennis Association (USTA) has pledged to adhere to government rulings surrounding coronavirus protocols, despite including Djokovic on the US Open entry list last month.

He remains on that list for now, but there was an indication that the US Open may not be expecting to see Djokovic when a promotional poster was revealed this week that featured four top women players and four leading men.

The men selected were defending champion Medvedev, 22-time grand slam winner Rafael Nadal, Australian Nick Kyrgios and Spanish teenager Carlos Alcaraz. All were archive pictures, so Djokovic could easily have been selected for the advertising campaign.

His exclusion prompted an angry response on social media from some fans of the 35-year-old Serbian, with one saying it would be "a failed tournament if he doesn't participate in it".

The US Open draws are due to take place on Thursday ahead of the start of the tournament on Monday.

Leading players are already assembling on site, with Medvedev, Serena Williams, Nadal, Alcaraz, Simona Halep and Andy Murray among those with practice sessions booked in for Tuesday.

For Djokovic to be allowed into the United States, it appears he would require a sudden change of entry rules from law-makers, or he would have to be considered suitable for an exemption.

In late July, he said he was "preparing as if I will be allowed to compete"; however, he has not been able to travel for the build-up tournaments.

On Instagram, Djokovic's last tennis-related post came on Monday night as he sent a congratulatory message to shock Cincinnati champion Borna Coric, telling the Croatian: "Bravo king! Totally deserved. All the effort and patience paid off. Go ahead and good luck."

Djokovic was not allowed to play at the Australian Open at the start of the year, when issues surrounding his visa ended with him being deported from Melbourne on public health grounds due to not taking the vaccine.

American great John McEnroe told Tennis 365 in July it was "crazy" that Djokovic should have to miss the US Open and called for a solution to be found.

The current entry rules in the United States were not in place when Djokovic was toppled by Medvedev in last year's men's singles final, ending his hopes of a calendar Grand Slam.

World number two Alexander Zverev has withdrawn from the US Open as he recovers from ankle surgery.

The German went under the knife after tearing all three of the lateral ligaments in his right ankle during his French Open semi-final against Rafael Nadal.

Zverev will not make his comeback at the final grand slam of the year in New York, as his withdrawal was announced on Monday.

The 25-year-old reached his only major final at Flushing Meadows two years ago, losing to Dominic Thiem.

Zverev stated after his operation that surgery was "the best choice" to ensure his ligaments heal properly and he could return to competition "as quickly as possible."

The US Open gets under way next Monday, with doubts remaining over whether Novak Djokovic will be able to play due to the 21-time grand slam champion opting against receiving a coronavirus vaccine.

The prize pot for this year's US Open will top $60million for the first time in the competition's history, event organisers have announced.

The 2022 edition at Flushing Meadows gets under way on August 29 and runs for just under two weeks.

It was revealed on Thursday that $60m will be up for grabs, topping the previous record of $57.5m from last year, with both singles champions to receive $2.6m.

Players will be given $80,000 for making the main draw and $121,000 should they make it to the second round. Runners-up in the singles will pocket $1.3m.

In the doubles, the champions will receive $688,000, the runners-up $344,000 and the semi-finalists $172,000.

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