In encouraging displays of forms at the 2024 New Life Invitational in the Bahamas, Jamaica's Ackera Nugent and the Bahamas' Donald Thomas delivered standout performances on Sunday night.

Nugent, in her first full year as a professional, and Thomas, the seasoned high jumper, both set meet records in their respective events. However, the night ended on a bittersweet note for Jamaica as their 4x400m relay team failed to secure Olympic qualification despite a valiant effort.

 Nugent, who has been sparingly raced this season, underscored her readiness for the upcoming Jamaican national championships with a dominant victory in the 100m hurdles.

Clocking a season-best 12.54 seconds, Nugent eased down after clearing the final hurdle, demonstrating both her confidence and control. This performance not only secured her the win but also broke the previous meet record held by fellow Jamaican Megan Tapper since 2023. Nugent’s coach, Chris Johnson, had recently expressed confidence in her form and training, and Sunday's performance was a testament to his faith. The USA’s Kaylah Robinson finished third with a time of 13.07 seconds, while Charisma Taylor trailed behind in second place, clocking 12.83 seconds.

In the men's high jump, the 39-year-old Thomas thrilled the home crowd by breaking his own meet record. Thomas cleared 2.28m, surpassing his previous mark of 2.26 meters set last year. His impressive jump secured him the top spot on the podium, with Jamaica’s Raymond Richards finishing second at 2.21m and Puerto Rico’s Luis Castro taking third with a clearance of 2.18m.

The night’s excitement culminated with the highly anticipated men's 4x400m relay, where Jamaica aimed to qualify for the Olympics by beating Zambia’s 2:59.11 or France’s 2:58.45. The Jamaican quartet put forth a formidable effort, setting a new meet record with a time of 2:59.75. Despite their remarkable performance, they fell short, leaving their hopes for Paris dashed.

Earlier in the evening, Antigua’s Joella Lloyd, who had already achieved the Olympic standard of 11.06 seconds at the NCAA West Regionals, won the Women's 100m. Lloyd clocked an impressive 11.15 seconds, outpacing Bahamian Camille Rutherford, who finished in 11.20 seconds, and 2013 World Championship silver medalist Murielle Ahoure-Demps, who came in third with a time of 11.24 seconds.

 

Jamaica’s 4x400m women have also booked their place at the Olympic Games in Paris this summer by winning the second round heat at the World Relays in the Bahamas on Sunday. The same four women lined up for the heat with the difference being that Roneisha McGregor running the lead off leg, Charokee Young on the second leg, Ashley Williams on the third leg and Junelle Bromfield on anchor.

The changes proved effective as the Jamaicans ran away with the heat winning impressively in 3:38.54.

India is also on their way to Paris after they finished in second place in a time of 3:29.35.

The Netherlands (3:27.45) and Switzerland (3:28.30) are also through along with Belgium (3:26.79) and Spain (3:27.30), a national record.

Meanwhile, Jamaica’s men will have to find another route to Paris after finished fifth in their heat and failed to qualify.

Trinidad and Tobago, though, produced a brave performance to secure a place in Paris. The quartet of Asa Guevara, Jereem Richards, Che Lara and Shakeem McKay battled hard to hold off France and seal the the final qualifying spot. Brazil won the heat in 3:01.86 with the brave Trinidadians finishing in 3:02.39.

 

 

Kingston College made it three Championship of America 4x400m titles in a row with a comfortable win in the event on the third and final day of the 128th Penn Relays at Franklin Field in Philadelphia on Saturday.

Their quartet of Antonio Forbes, Amal Glasgow, Roshawn Lee and Marcinho Rose combined to run 3:11.86 to win ahead of Excelsior (3:12.94) and Bullis School (3:13.10).

Elsewhere, Jamaica College won their second Championship of America 4x800m relay in three years.

Their team of Nellie Amberton, Samuel Creary, Rasheed Pryce and Kemarrio Bygrave produced a time of 7:42.37 to win ahead of St. John’s College (7:44.66) and Central Bucks West (7:45.99).

Hydel High successfully defended their Championship of America 4x400m title on day two of the 128th Penn Relays at the Franklin Field in Philadelphia on Friday.

The quartet of Alliah Baker, Jody-Ann Daley, Nastassia Fletcher and Abigail Campbell combined to run 3:34.78 to win ahead of Bullis School (3:35.17) and Union Catholic (3:41.75).

Hydel captain Alliah Baker reacted to her second gold medal of the meet.

“I am not shocked but I’m very excited. This is my last year and I’m very happy to finish my last year with two gold medals,” she said.

Hydel have now won this event three straight times and five times in the last six years.

 

Jamaica asserted its dominance on the track as the curtains closed on the 51st Carifta Games at the Kirani James Athletics Stadium in Grenada, clinching victory in all four 4x400m relays on Monday. With commanding performances reminiscent of their sprint hurdles dominance earlier in the final session, the Jamaican teams showcased their class, bringing the Games to a thrilling conclusion.

However, the final race of the night, the Under 20 Boys 4x400m relay, was not without its share of drama. As Trinidad and Tobago, the Bahamas, and Grenada set off in the race, they halted unexpectedly, anticipating a recall that never came. They were allowed to re-run for time during which Trinidad and Tobago ultimately emerged victorious, with the Bahamas crossing the line second.

However, neither team were able to eclipse Jamaica's winning time of 3:10.58 from the original race. Trinidad were eventually awarded silver having run a time of 3:11.10. Guyana was third in a time of 3:14.05. Bahamas were disqualified.

In the Under 17 Girls 4x400m relay, Jamaica's team, led by Britannia Bailey, Nastassia Fletcher, Kevongaye Fowler, and Tresha Lee Sutherland, surged to victory in 3:41.84. The Bahamas secured silver in a time of 3:47.13 while Trinidad and Tobago claimed bronze in 3:54.49.

Similarly, in the Under 20 Girls 4x400m relay, Jamaica's formidable quartet of Abigail Campbell, Shanique Williams, Kitania Headley, and Shanoya Douglas clocked a time of 3:34.69, securing another gold medal for the nation. Trinidad and Tobago and the Bahamas clinched silver and bronze, in times of 3:47.51 and 3:49.82, respectively.

Jamaica’s U17 Boys executed flawlessly to win in dominant fashion in a time of 3:18.43. Trinidad and Tobago won the silver running 3:21.24 with the bronze medal going to Grenada who ran 3:21.92.

With an impressive medal haul of 45 gold, 23 silver, and 16 bronze medals, Jamaica emerged as the overall victor of the Carifta Games.

The Bahamas finished second overall with 35 medals; nine gold, 13 silver and 13 bronze medals with Trinidad and Tobago third with 27 medals, four gold, 11 silver and 12 bronze medals.

Guyana won eight medals; four gold, three silver and a bronze medal while Guadeloupe finished fifth with five medals, two gold, a silver and two bronze medals. Hosts Grenada had an outstanding Carifta Games winning one gold, six silver and six bronze medals which placed them seventh in the standings.

Trinidad and Tobago’s Janae De Gannes won the prestigious Austin Sealy Award for her record-breaking jump of 6.50m in the U20 Girls Long Jump.

 

 

 

In yet another remarkable display of her incredible talents on the track, Adaejah Hodge of the British Virgin Islands bid farewell to her high school indoor track career in grand fashion, clinching two gold medals and a silver at the New Balance Indoor Nationals in Boston on Sunday.

The 17-year-old standout, set to embark on her journey at the University of Georgia in the fall, left an indelible mark on her high school track legacy. Her exceptional career at the Montverde Academy, where she was named the Georgia High School Track and Field Athlete of the Year in 2022, reached new heights at the national event leading her school to the Girls Championship title.

In her first event, the 60m dash, she secured a silver medal with a swift time of 7.22 seconds. Despite her impressive performance, she finished just behind the outstanding Briana Selby, who set a lightning-fast pace of 7.19 seconds, both athletes eclipsing the previous meet record of 7.26 set the previous year by Shawnti Jackson. Keira Beaumont claimed the third spot with a time of 7.42.

However, Hodge's day was far from over. She continued her dominance in the 200m, storming to victory with a blistering time of 22.96 seconds to successfully defend her title as national champion. Teammate Dasia Reed secured the second position with a time of 23.67, while Sade Gray claimed third place in 23.82.

 

The crowning glory came as Hodge anchored the Montverde Academy's 4x400m team, running the lead-off leg that propelled them to a gold-medal triumph and a new championship record of 3:38.18. Hodge's split time of 55.84 set the tone for a stellar performance, showcasing her versatility and strength.

The team's talented athletes, including Michelle Smith from the US Virgin Islands, contributed significantly to the record-setting feat. Smith clocked 52.81 in the second leg, followed by Alivia Williams with 54.13 in the third leg, and Dasia Reed anchoring with 55.42.

The gold-medal-winning effort not only secured a momentous victory for Montverde Academy but also shattered their own previous record of 3:45.69, set just a year ago. Bullis claimed the silver medal with a time of 3:41.58, also inside the previous record, while Union Catholic TC secured the third position in 3:47.59.

Hodge's outstanding performance at the New Balance Indoor Nationals serves as a fitting tribute to her high school indoor track career, setting the stage for her outdoor season and ultimately, a promising future at the University of Georgia.

Great Britain set a new national record as they qualified for the final of the 4×400 metre relay at the World Athletics Indoor Championships.

Lina Nielsen, Ama Pipi, Hannah Kelly and Jessie Knight won their heat in three minutes, 26.4 seconds in Glasgow.

They finished almost a second ahead of Jamaica, with the Czech Republic third.

“I love this track,” anchor leg Knight told the BBC. “I’m not the best at getting out in the first 200 but I really tried, and not overcooking it as well.

“I’m really happy with that. I felt strong at the end and we’re really excited for the final. We’re going for the win as always.”

The Netherlands, favourites for the gold medal, qualified from the first heat in 3min 27.70sec.

Jamaica secured a spot in the final of the men’s 4x400m relay on day eight of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Saturday.

Jamaica’s quartet of Rusheen McDonald, Jevaughn Powell, Zandrion Barnes and D’Andre Anderson ran 2:59.82 to win the second semi-final ahead of France (3:00.05) and Italy (3:00.14).

On the other hand, Trinidad & Tobago’s team of Renny Quow, Asa Guevara, Shakeem McKay and Jereem Richards ran 3:01.54 for seventh in the first semi-final. USA (2:58.47), India (2:59.05), Great Britain (2:59.42) and Botswana (2:59.42) made it through from that race.

 

Trinidad & Tobago took gold in the men’s 4x400m relay on Friday’s final day of Athletics at the 2023 CAC Games in San Salvador.

The team of Che Lara, Renny Quow, Machel Cedenio and Jereem Richards combined to run 3:01.99 for gold. The Barbados quartet of Kyle Gale, Rasheeme Griffith, Rivaldo Leacock and Desean Boyce ran 3:02.12 while the Dominican Republic took bronze in 3:02.19.

In the field, Jamaica’s Adrienne Adams threw 55.43m for bronze in the women’s discus throw. Cuba’s Silinda Morales threw 61.95 for gold while Mexico’s Alma Pollorena threw 55.58m for silver.

Kingston College successfully defended their Championship of America High School Boys 4x400m title on day two of the 127th Penn Relays at the Franklin Field.

The team of Amal Glasgow, Marcinho Rose, Raheem Richards and Emmanuel Rwotomiya combined to run 3:15.62 to take the title ahead of New Jersey’s Seton Hall Prep (3:16.06) and Calabar (3:16.54).

KC also found themselves on the podium in the 4x800 where they finished second in 7:47.68, narrowly being beaten by New Jersey’s Chatham (7:47.66) while St. Elizabeth Technical were third in 7:49.45.

 

Jamaica swept all four 4x400m relays on the final day of the 50th edition of the CARIFTA Games at the Thomas A. Robinson Stadium in Nassau on Monday.

First, Jamaica’s quartet Breana Brown, Jody-Ann Daley, Rosalee Gallimore and Rhianna Lewis comfortably won the Under-17 Girls section in 3:43.43. More than seven seconds behind in second were Barbados (3:50.94) while the Bahamas were third in 3:51.60.

The team of Demarco Bennett, Nickecoy Bramwell, Deandre Gayle, Kenrick Sharpe combined to run 3:19.04 to win the Under-17 Boys section ahead of the Bahamas (3:20.47) and Trinidad & Tobago (3:23.74).

Tonyan Beckford, Rickiann Russell, Kacian Powell, Abigail Campbell combined to absolutely dominate the Under-20 Girls section in 3:33.35. Trinidad & Tobago finished a distant second in 3:44.19 while the Bahamas were third in 3:47.68.

Jasauna Dennis, Roshawn Clarke, Delano Kennedy and Malique Smith-Band combined to run 3:07.68 for victory in the Under-20 Boys section ahead of Trinidad & Tobago (3:09.97) and Grenada (3:10.59).

Individually, Trinidad & Tobago’s Tafari Waldron took gold in the Under-20 Boys 5000m in 15:33.38 ahead of Bermuda’s Kahzi Sealey (15:37.56) and Jake Brislane (15.45.84).

In the field, Jamaican World Under-20 record holder Jaydon Hibbert jumped 16.11m to retain his Under-20 triple jump title ahead of the Bahamas’ Laquan Ellis (14.92m) and Guyana’s Trevon Hamer (14.89m).

Under-20 400m hurdles winner, Jamaica’s Roshawn Clarke, who became only the second man to run under 50 seconds at CARIFTA, was named the Austin Sealy Award winner as the meet’s most outstanding athlete.

Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper, 2015 World champion Danielle Williams and 2022 World Indoor silver medallist Devynne Charlton all advanced to the final of the Women’s 100m hurdles at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham on Friday.

Jamaica’s Tapper and The Bahamas’ Charlton ran times of 12.68 and 12.70, respectively, to finish first and second in heat two and advance.

Williams advances after finishing second in heat one in 12.80 behind England’s Cindy Sember (12.67).

World Champion and world record holder Tobi Amusan of Nigeria qualified for the final fastest with a time of 12.40 to win heat three.

Jamaica also qualified for the final of the Men’s 4x400m relay after a second-place finish in heat one.

The quartet of Karayme Bartley, Anthony Cox, Navasky Anderson and Javon Francis combined to run 3:05.20 to finish behind Botswana (3:05.11).

Trinidad & Tobago (3:07.12) and Barbados (3:07.23) finished third and fourth in heat two and also booked spots in the final.

In the field, Jamaica’s Ackelia Smith (6.35m) and Trinidad & Tobago’s Tyra Gittens (6.28m) both advanced to the final of the Women’s long jump.

The Dominican Republic took gold in the Mixed Relay to close out day one of the 2022 World Athletics Championships in Eugene on Friday.

The quartet of Lidio Andres Feliz, Marileidy Paulino, Alexander Ogando and Fiordaliza Cofil sped to a world leading 3:09.82 to secure gold ahead of the Netherlands (3:09.90) and the USA (3:10.16).

Jamaica’s Adelle Tracey ran 4:05.14 to advance to the semi-finals of the Women’s 1500m while Yohan Blake, Ackeem Blake and Oblique Seville all advanced to Saturday’s semi-finals in the 100m.

Seville ran 9.93 to win his heat while Yohan Blake (10.04) and Ackeem Blake (10.15) came second in their respective heats. American gold medal favourite Fred Kerley stole the show with a fast 9.79 to win his heat while countrymen and fellow medal favourites Trayvon Bromell (9.89) and Christian Coleman (10.08) also safely advanced to the semi-finals.

In the field, 2019 World Championship silver medallist Danniel Thomas-Dodd needed only one throw to advance to the final of the women’s shot put with 19.09m.

Jamaica’s Wayne Pinnock advanced to his first senior global final with a 7.98m effort in the long jump.

Hydel High was the fastest qualifiers to the Championships of America High School Girls 4x400m final at the 2022 Penn Relays at the Franklin Field in Philadelphia on Thursday.

The team of Alliah Baker, Brianna Lyston, Kerrica Hill and Onieka McAnuff ran an impressive 3:39.34 to lead all qualifiers into Friday’s final.

Holmwood Technical (3:41.45), Edwin Allen (3:45.29), St. Jago (3:49.50) and Excelsior (3:51.15) also advanced to the final.

The region will also have two representatives in the 4x800m final, also scheduled for Friday, as both Edwin Allen (9:13.89) and Holmwood Technical (9:23.48) advanced from the heats.

 

Kingston College superstar jumper Jaydon Hibbert added to his Class I long jump title after smashing the triple jump record on the way to his second gold medal on Day 4 of the ISSA Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston on Friday.

Hibbert uncorked a personal best and world junior leading mark of 16.66m to win gold ahead of the Jamaica College pair of Rajaun Ricketts (15.06m) and Stafon Roach (14.92m).

The 2021 silver medalist at the World Junior Championships in Nairobi, Kenya, erased former O'Brien Wasome’s Class I record of 16.39 done in 2016.

On the track, Edwin Allen, St. Catherine High, Dinthill Technical, Alphansus Davis High, Holmwood Technical, The Queen’s School, Maggotty High and Excelsior all advanced to the final of the Girls 1600m Sprint Medley.

STETHS, Jamaica College, Kingston College, Calabar, Vere Technical, William Knibb, Excelsior and Petersfield advanced to the Boys 1600m Sprint Medley final.

Holmwood Technical, Hydel, Excelsior, St. Jago, Edwin Allen, St. Mary High, St. Catherine High and Manchester High will contest the final of the Girls 4x400m Relay.

Jamaica College, Calabar, St. Jago, Edwin Allen, Kingston College, Excelsior, STETHS and Manchester High all advanced to the final of the Boys 4x400m Relay.

 

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