Jamaica's history-making cyclist Llori Sharpe features in latest commercial from Canyon Bicycles

By September 12, 2022

Jamaican cyclist, Llori Sharpe is one of the main characters featured in the latest commercial released by Canyon Bicycles and which is being aired in Europe.

In 2020, Sharpe decided to focus solely on cycling after several years of competing in swimming and triathlon. She competed at several international events including the Central American and Caribbean championship swimming and triathlon events.

The 22-year-old Sharpe made history in 2021 when she signed a one-year contract with the German cycling team Canyon-SRAM Generation becoming the first Jamaican to sign with a European cycling team.

In several shots in the commercial, she is shown riding the new Canyon bicycle in the hills of Italy.

Speaking with Sportsmax.TV about the filming of the commercial that took place between June 26 and 30, Sharpe said it was a bit arduous but otherwise an interesting learning experience.

“We were in Italy for about four days, but I only had two filming days. They were pretty long actually as we had to get up around two in the morning, started shooting at about three and then finished around 12-1 in the afternoon,” she said.

“Of course, we'd take breaks throughout, but as you can well imagine, a schedule like that can be really exhausting.”

She did, however, get some time off, which she took full advantage of.

“Fortunately, I did have the rest of the day to recover and pretty much do whatever I wanted and I was even able to hop on the bike and explore for a bit,” she said.

“What I found most interesting was the amount of background work and repetition that goes into filming something as big as this project.

“I did catch a glimpse of the work involved during the team's training camp back in January as quite a few sponsors came to film for the year ahead and having been a part of this project, the experience gained is not only invaluable but would certainly put me in a better position in the event that I'm selected to do something similar.”

Seemingly introverted and soft-spoken, Sharpe revealed that it was by chance that she got to do the commercial but she is glad she got the opportunity.

“The director and head of marketing and communications told me that Canyon needed a rider for their upcoming project,” she explained.

“Luckily, I didn't have any races then so the timing was perfect for me to be a part of the filming for the new bike's launch.”

She remains hopeful that shooting this commercial will open other similar opportunities in the future.

“Can't really say as I'm not sure myself, but hopefully having been involved in this project, Canyon and or other sponsors of the team would like me to be a part of future projects and product launches,” said Sharpe who is currently back home in Jamaica for a short break before she returns to Europe when competition begins again in January.

 

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Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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