Kim Si-woo nailed a hole-in-one en route to taking a two-shot lead at the Wyndham Championship in a third round where Rob Oppenheim and Jim Herman shot career-low scores.

Low scoring was in order on moving day at the Sedgefield Country Club, where tee times were brought forward due to the threat of inclement weather.

South Korean Kim carded an eight-under 62 to move to 18 under for the tournament, with his efforts underpinned by a stunning ace at the par-three third where his tee shot struck the pin and nestled into the cup.

Three more birdies and a solitary bogey saw him go out in just 31 strokes, while the 2016 champion made four more gains on the way home.

Oppenheim moved alongside Doc Redman at 16 under having also shot 62, his lowest ever on the PGA Tour.

American Oppenheim would have celebrated a lower score had it not been for a bogey at the last sullying an otherwise flawless round.

Herman, four shots off the lead, did go one better for his own best PGA Tour score, with a 61 featuring six birdies on the back nine including five straight between the 13th and 17th.

Billy Horschel held outright fourth place at 15 under, while Herman was joined at 14 under by Mark Hubbard.

Zach Johnson matched Herman's 61 to sit six shots back of Kim.

Kim Si-woo nailed a hole-in-one en route to taking a two-shot lead at the Wyndham Championship in a third round where Rob Oppenheim and Jim Herman shot career-low scores.

Low scoring was in order on moving day at the Sedgefield Country Club, where tee times were brought forward due to the threat of inclement weather.

South Korean Kim carded an eight-under 62 to move to 18 under for the tournament, with his efforts underpinned by a stunning ace at the par-three third where his tee shot struck the pin and nestled into the cup.

Three more birdies and a solitary bogey saw him go out in just 31 strokes, while the 2016 champion made four more gains on the way home.

Oppenheim moved alongside Doc Redman at 16 under having also shot 62, his lowest ever on the PGA Tour.

American Oppenheim would have celebrated a lower score had it not been for a bogey at the last sullying an otherwise flawless round.

Herman, four shots off the lead, did go one better for his own best PGA Tour score, with a 61 featuring six birdies on the back nine including five straight between the 13th and 17th.

Billy Horschel held outright fourth place at 15 under, while Herman was joined at 14 under by Mark Hubbard.

Zach Johnson matched Herman's 61 to sit six shots back of Kim.

Tom Hoge, Kim Si-woo, Talor Gooch and Billy Horschel are tied for the lead after the second round of the Wyndham Championship, while four-time major champion Brooks Koepka missed the cut.

The quartet of Hoge, Kim, Gooch and Horschel are one stroke clear atop the leaderboard at the halfway stage of the PGA Tour tournament in North Carolina.

Hoge was in a three-way tie for the lead at the start of the second round, joined by Harold Varner III and Roger Sloan, and the American maintained his position at the Sedgefield Country Club on Friday.

Five birdies and two bogeys helped Hoge to a two-under-par 68 to be 10 under through 36 holes, alongside 2016 champion Kim (65), Gooch (65) and Horschel (64).

Harris English (67), Shane Lowry (63), Andrew Landry (65), Doc Redman (64) and Varner (69) are a stroke off the pace heading into the weekend, while Sloan is a shot further back after his second-round 70.

Patrick Reed – winner of the event in 2013 – and US PGA Championship runner-up Paul Casey are among a group tied at seven under.

Former world number one and three-time major champion Jordan Spieth avoided the cut following his three-under-par 67.

Struggling for form, Spieth improved 25 positions above the cut line – three under – after opening the tournament with a 70.

However, American star Koepka failed to qualify for the weekend, along with defending champion J.T. Poston (66) and Justin Rose (67).

After he was unable to complete a three-peat of US PGA titles last week, Koepka's second-round 70 saw him finish the tournament two over.

Tiger Woods has confirmed he will play at next week's Northern Trust as he seeks a third FedEx Cup trophy.

The tournament in Boston is the first of three playoff events that will bring the coronavirus-affected 2019-20 PGA Tour season to a conclusion.

Woods, winner of the FedEx Cup in 2007 and 2009, would be the first player to claim the honour three times.

He confirmed his participation at TPC Boston on Twitter on Friday, writing: "Excited to head to Boston for @TheNTGolf and start the #FedExCup Playoffs."

Woods, A 15-time major winner, finished in a tie for 37th at the recent US PGA Championship.

The American has been increasingly selective with his schedule as he manages his workload to mitigate injury and fitness concerns.

Indeed, the Northern Trust would be just the sixth event of the season for the 44-year-old, who will need to force his way into the top 70 of the FedEx Cup standings to progress to the next event, the BMW Championship, at the end of the month.

Brooks Koepka downplayed his relationship with Dustin Johnson after his controversial comments at the US PGA Championship.

After the third round at TPC Harding Park on Saturday, Koepka reminded Johnson he had "only won one" major as both looked to claim the title in San Francisco.

Koepka fell short in his three-peat bid and Johnson ended up runner-up as Collin Morikawa won his maiden major.

Four-time major champion Koepka was criticised for those comments and the American downplayed his relationship with Johnson on Thursday.

"We worked out, I worked with Joey [Diovisalvi, trainer] for two years," he said after the first round of the Wyndham Championship.

"You guys make your own stories so I have no idea what you all do, but I think even the Jordan [Spieth] and Justin [Thomas] thing gets blown out too much.

"I think you guys overplay a lot of things."

In his comments at the US PGA, Koepka also said: "I don't know a lot of the other guys up there".

The 30-year-old, who opened with a two-over 72 at the Wyndham Championship, apologised, but felt too much was made about what he said.

"I apologise for the other guys comment just cos' I really didn't look at the leaderboard," Koepka said.

"I saw Dustin was at nine [under], I was at five at that point and then made two coming in so I really didn't even know where I kind of stood, didn't really look coming off 18 and then went right into the interview.

"I had no idea who was eight, who was seven, but I never really look at guys that are tied with me, I always kind of look ahead so I had no idea but I get it, I get how it came across and I apologise for that."

Harold Varner III fired an eight-under 62 to be in a three-way tie for the lead as the Wyndham Championship first round was suspended.

Varner, Tom Hoge and Roger Sloan opened with 62s at the Sedgefield Country Club in North Carolina on Thursday.

Having finished tied for 29th at the US PGA Championship, Varner produced a bogey-free opening round that featured eight birdies.

Hoge got to nine under before a bogey at the last, while Sloan mixed nine birdies with a bogey.

The trio are two shots clear atop the leaderboard, ahead of Harris English, who carded a 64 to be outright fourth.

The round was suspended and later called off for the day due to inclement weather, with 33 players yet to complete 18 holes.

Ryan Brehm (five under through 14), Talor Gooch (five under through 16) and Hank Lebioda (five under through 16) are the best-placed of those yet to finish their first rounds.

They are tied for fifth alongside Wesley Bryan, Brian Harman, Kim Si-woo, Patrick Reed and Chesson Hadley, who opened with 65s.

Defending champion J.T. Poston, meanwhile, struggled badly to a four-over 74 to be back in a tie for 142nd.

Runner-up at the US PGA, Paul Casey carded a 67 to be tied for 25th alongside the likes of Sergio Garcia.

Three-time major champion Jordan Spieth was again unable to get much going, shooting a 70.

The Masters will be held behind closed doors in November due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The tournament, which has been held in April every year since 1945, was postponed to November 9-15 due to the threat of COVID-19.

While the major is still due to take place this year, organisers have said the risks involved in terms of allowing visitors into Augusta are "simply too significant to overcome".

Ticket holders for 2020 will be guaranteed the same tickets for the tournament next year.

Augusta chairman Fred Ridley said in a statement: "Since our initial announcement to postpone the 2020 Masters, we have remained committed to a rescheduled tournament in November while continually examining how best to host a global sporting event amid this pandemic.

"As we have considered the issues facing us, the health and safety of everyone associated with the Masters always has been our first and most important priority.

"Throughout this process, we have consulted with health officials and a variety of subject matter experts. Ultimately, we determined that the potential risks of welcoming patrons and guests to our grounds in November are simply too significant to overcome.

"Even in the current circumstances, staging the Masters without patrons is deeply disappointing. The guests who come to Augusta each spring from around the world are a key component to making the tournament so special.

"Augusta National has the responsibility, however, to understand and accept the challenges associated with this virus and take the necessary precautions to conduct all aspects of the tournament in a safe manner. We look forward to the day when we can welcome all of our patrons back, hopefully in April 2021.

"We appreciate the support and patience of all those we serve – including the Augusta community, our corporate and broadcast partners and our friends in golf – as we continue to plan for this historic event."

If Blink 182 are to be believed, nobody likes you when you're 23. 

Not that Collin Morikawa will care much if the song lyric is true, given he will start a new week as a major winner following his stunning US PGA Championship victory. 

A flawless six-under-par 64 in Sunday's final round earned the up-and-coming American a two-shot win from Dustin Johnson and Paul Casey. 

Only two men - Gene Sarazen (twice) and Tom Creavy - won the tournament before turning 23, while Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy were the same age as Morikawa when they triumphed. 

Esteemed company for Morikawa, then. Here is what the new major champion will now try and live up to. 

Jack Nicklaus (1963 - aged 23 years, six months) 

'The Golden Bear' was already a two-time major winner by the time he claimed the PGA Championship for the first time at the Dallas Athletic Club in July 1963. Nicklaus was three strokes back of leader Bruce Crampton heading into the final round but wound up winning by two shots from Dave Ragan. Nicklaus' haul of 18 majors remains a record, while his five PGA Championship triumphs is a joint-best with Walter Hagen.  

 
Tiger Woods (1999 - aged 23 years, seven months) 

In a memorable Medinah battle with fellow youngster Sergio Garcia, Woods prevailed to win the PGA Championship 21 years ago. He led Garcia by five after the 11th but stumbled down the stretch and triumphed by a solitary stroke. The American now has 15 majors to his name, while Garcia has just the one having been tipped to win multiple during those early years. Woods has four PGA Championship wins to his name, the last of which came in 2007. 

 
Rory McIlroy (2012, aged 23 years, three months) 

A couple of 67s sandwiched a 75 prior to a magical Sunday at Kiawah Island for a still fresh-faced McIlroy. The Northern Irishman needed just 24 putts in a round of 66 en route to winning by a record eight strokes as his nearest rivals stumbled. It was the first of McIlroy's two wins at the PGA Championship, the other coming two years later. Arguably the biggest surprise is the fact McIlroy has not yet managed to add another major since, with the former world number one stuck on four. 

Stephen Curry offered to be Collin Morikawa's caddie after the American's US PGA Championship success.

Morikawa fired a six-under 64 in the final round at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco to win his first major by two strokes on Sunday.

Golden State Warriors star Curry was in attendance and went to the 23-year-old's media conference afterwards.

After asking the first question, Curry – whose Warriors endured a poor 2019-20 NBA season and did not head to the bubble in Florida – followed up by asking to replace Morikawa's caddie J.J. Jakovac.

"I'm free for the next three months if you need a caddie or replacement. No, J.J. is a great guy, but if you need me, I'm available," Curry said.

Morikawa responded: "Perfect. I can't wait. I want to see your game."

Morikawa produced a brilliant final round to win his first major, becoming the third-youngest winner of the US PGA since World War II, behind only Rory McIlroy and Jack Nicklaus.

A three-time winner on the PGA Tour, Morikawa was proud to be alongside the greats.

"It's great company. It's been crazy, because this entire start of my professional career, I see all the things comparing to Tiger [Woods] and doing all this and then Tiger is on a completely different level. I think we all know that," he said.

"But any time you're in the conversation of the greats, Jack, Rory, Tiger, no matter who it is, if you're in that conversation, you're doing something well.

"So to know that, yeah, what I've done, what I did my four years in college, was obviously worth it, but there's just that extra sense of feeling good in my heart, to finish out, get my business degree, graduate, come out here knowing I'm prepared, and knowing that it's possible.

"You know, when you feel you're ready, you're ready, but to be in the conversation with those guys, it's very special and yeah, you know, I'm ready for the next."

Brooks Koepka turned his attention to the two remaining majors in 2020 as the American star remained upbeat following his unsuccessful attempt to win a third consecutive US PGA Championship.

Koepka struggled on the final day of the tournament in San Francisco, where Collin Morikawa broke through for his maiden major title thanks to a thrilling two-shot triumph on Sunday.

Eyeing a third straight US PGA crown and fifth major victory, Koepka started the day two strokes off the pace but a final-round 74 saw his hopes dashed at TPC Harding Park.

Koepka finished tied for 29th at three under through 72 holes, 10 shots behind fellow American Morikawa.

"To be honest, the bogey on two was not good," Koepka, with the U.S. Open and Masters to come, said as he reflected on his round.

"But to make the turn at four over was disappointing, to say the least. You knew you had to be under par, at least one, to have a good chance on the back side.

"It's my first bad round in a while in a major. You know, I was just there to cheer Paul [Casey] on. That was it. Just try to help him get it in the house and see how well he could finish, because I had put myself out of it already.

"Hey, wasn't meant to be. Three in a row, you're not really supposed to do two in a row looking at history, but that's all right. Got two more the rest of the season and we'll figure it out from there."

Asked about Morikawa as the 23-year-old closed in on his victory ahead of Paul Casey and Dustin Johnson, Koepka said: "He's a hell of a player. He's really good. You see these guys coming out of college now, they are ready to win, and prime example.

"I think of that group, him, Matt Wolff, Viktor Hovland, it's impressive what they do. They come out of college and they're ready to play out here. Hats off to him.

"For this week, it's impressive. This golf course, you really have to golf your ball and make some putts. He was obviously the best at that, and that's impressive. You know, to win a major this young in your career, he's got a lot of upside."

Paul Casey labelled Collin Morikawa as "something special" after the American's US PGA Championship win.

Morikawa carded a six-under 64 in the final round at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco on Sunday to beat Casey (66) and Dustin Johnson (68) by two strokes.

The 23-year-old became the third-youngest player to win the US PGA since World War II, behind only Rory McIlroy and Jack Nicklaus.

Casey, who has 10 top-10 finishes in majors without a win, paid tribute to Morikawa.

"I played phenomenal golf and there's nothing I would change. I'm very, very happy with how I played, great attitude, stayed very calm and stayed in the present. It wasn't enough," the Englishman said.

"The glorious shots Collin hit like on 16 to make eagle, you have to tip your cap. When he popped up on Tour not that long ago, those guys who were paying attention like myself knew that this was something special, and he's proved it today.

"He's already sort of proved it but he's really stamped his authority of how good he is today.

"But I'm very, very happy with everything. I kind of got my mojo back now."

Morikawa produced some magic at the 16th hole, putting an incredible 293-yard tee shot to within seven feet for eagle.

Casey had just made birdie at the same hole and the 43-year-old hailed Morikawa for his shot.

"It's my tee shot on the 17th which was bothering me more," he said.

"Brilliant shot. I love the fact we've got drivable par-fours. You know I'm a big fan of the shorter hole. I love the fact that we're given an opportunity, and then a guy like Collin steps up and shows you what's possible on a drivable par-four. Nothing I can do except tip my hat. It was a phenomenal shot.

"I knew he made the putt because we could hear the small roar, the small clap and cheer when he holed it in. I think I was on the 18th tee at the time. Yeah, I was very focused on myself, so other than acknowledging what a shot he hit, I was trying to take care of business."

Collin Morikawa revelled in an "amazing" victory after winning the US PGA Championship on Sunday.

The 23-year-old American became the third youngest player to win the tournament since 1946 thanks to a thrilling victory at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco.

Morikawa fired a six-under 64 in the final round to secure a two-stroke victory ahead of Dustin Johnson and Paul Casey.

"It's amazing. It's been a life goal, obviously as a little kid, kind of watching everyone grow up, all these professionals, and this is always what I've wanted to do," he said at the trophy presentation.

"I felt very comfortable from the start. As an amateur, junior golfer, turning professional last year, but to finally close it off and come out here in San Francisco, pretty much my second home where I spent the last four years, is pretty special."

Morikawa produced some late magic with a chip in for birdie at the 14th before an eagle at the par-four 16th after an incredible tee shot.

The tee shot at 16 reminded Morikawa of a similar one at the Workday Charity Open last month, when he won his second PGA Tour title.

"[Fourteen] at Muirfield is pretty special, and my caddie looked at me after I hit my shot on 16 tee and asked me the same exact question. It just fit my eye," he said.

"We were just hoping for a really good bounce, and we got it, hit a really good putt, and now we're here."

Collin Morikawa made history after clinching the US PGA Championship in San Francisco, while he became the third-youngest winner since World War II.

Morikawa celebrated a breakthrough on Sunday, claiming his maiden major title by two strokes in a thrilling finish at TPC Harding Park.

The 23-year-old posted a final-round 64 to finish 13 under for the tournament, ahead of Paul Casey and Dustin Johnson.

With back-to-back rounds of 65 and 64 for a 129 score, Morikawa recorded the lowest closing 36-hole tally by a major champion.

Aged 23 years, six months and three days, Morikawa also became the third-youngest champion of the major since 1946, only behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, six months in 1963) and Rory McIlroy (23 years, three months and eight days in 2012).

Morikawa's six-under-par 64 in the final round also tied the lowest final-round score by a US PGA winner since Steve Elkington in 1995.

Collin Morikawa claimed his maiden major triumph with a thrilling two-stroke victory at the US PGA Championship on Sunday.

The American, 23, got the better of a tight pack bidding for victory at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco thanks to some late brilliance.

Morikawa's final five holes included an eagle and a birdie as he fired a final-round six-under 64 to finish at 13 under.

Previously a two-time winner on the PGA Tour, Morikawa – playing his second major – chipped in for birdie at 14 before producing an incredible tee shot at 16 and holding his nerve to make eagle.

Morikawa is the third youngest US PGA winner since 1946, only behind Jack Nicklaus (1963) and Rory McIlroy (2012).

It came under enormous pressure during a thrilling final round in which seven players were at one stage tied for the lead with the last pairing on the back nine.

Dustin Johnson, the 2016 U.S. Open champion, was among that group and look favoured for a second major triumph, but the American finished as runner-up with Paul Casey (66) at 11 under after a 68.

Matthew Wolff (65), Jason Day (66), Bryson DeChambeau (66), Tony Finau (66) and Scottie Scheffler (68) finished in the group tied for fourth.

Bidding to win a third straight US PGA title, Brooks Koepka struggled massively to a 74.

McIlroy (68) finished tied for 33rd at two under, a shot ahead of Tiger Woods, who fired his best round of the tournament with a 67.

With the final pairing on the back nine, seven players – Johnson, Day, Morikawa, Finau, Scheffler, Casey and Wolff – were tied for the lead at 10 under.

Wolff was the clubhouse leader following his 65, but Morikawa edged ahead thanks to some brilliance at the 14th, chipping in after leaving an approach short.

Scheffler, in the final pairing alongside Johnson, slipped out of the leading group following a bogey at 13.

Bryson DeChambeau, who made a red-hot start before dropping back-to-back shots at eight and nine, joined the group chasing Morikawa thanks to a birdie at 16.

Johnson dropped back to nine under after finding the bunker at 14, while Morikawa missed a chance to stretch his lead to two.

Despite finding two bunkers at the last, Day carded a 66 to join Wolff in the clubhouse lead.

Casey joined Morikawa at 11 under after a superb shot out of the bunker at 16 led to a birdie, but the latter produced some more magic.

Morikawa put his 293-yard tee shot at the par-four 16th to within seven feet and made the clutch putt to pull two clear, pars at the final two holes closing out his victory.

Morikawa's biggest hiccup of the day came when lifting the Wanamaker Trophy as the lid flew off during the presentation, but the victor was all smiles.

Collin Morikawa claimed his maiden major triumph with a thrilling victory at the US PGA Championship on Sunday.

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