Thompson-Herah runs 10.87, Briana Williams breaks 100m U20 record, again, at New Life Invitational

By June 06, 2021

Elaine Thompson-Herah won both the 100 and 200m at the inaugural NACAC New Life Invitational in Miramar, Florida, on Saturday.

Also, at the meet held at the Ansin Sports Complex, the training ground of Briana Williams, the 19-year-old emerging star broke her national U20 record for the third time in what was her sixth race in a week.

Thompson-Herah led from start to finish to take the 100m in 10.87. The USA’s Tiana Bartoletta established a season-best 10.96, just ahead of Williams. The 2018 World U20 Champion lowered her previous best of 10.98 set on May 30, to 10.97.

The reigning Olympic 200m champion would end the day unbeaten running a season-best 22.54 to win the 200m. The USA’s Kyra Jefferson was second in 22.77 with Great Britain’s Jodie Williams third in 23.10.

Trayvon Bromell ran a world-leading 9.77 to win the 100m ahead of Marvin Bracy, who clocked a season-best 9.85 for second place. Chris Royster was third in 10.08.

Daveon Collins won the men’s 200m in 20.73 beating Kyle Greaux of Trinidad and Tobago and Teray Smith of the Bahamas who ran 20.84 and 20.92 for second and third, respectively.

Deon Lendore of Trinidad and Tobago won the 400m in 45.48 to beat 2008 Olympic champion Lashawn Merritt, who ran a modest 46.22. Alonzo Russell of the Bahamas ran 46.44 for third.

The USA’s Wadeline Jonathas won the women’s one-lap sprint in 51.91. Jamaica’s Tiffany James-Rose was second in 52.74 while Nnenya Hailey was third in 52.90.

In the field, Fedrick Dacres threw a season-best 66.01m in the men’s discus but lost to Samoa’s Alex Rose who threw 67.12m to win. Kai Chang threw 63.33m for third place.

In the 400m hurdles, world champion Dalilah Mohammad was an easy winner in 54.50. Jamaica’s Ronda Whyte finished second in 55.65 with Yanique Haye-Smith of the Turks and Caicos Islands clocking 56.12 for third.

The men’s race was won by Costa Rica’s Gerald Drummond in 49.47 over Jamaica’s Shawn Rowe who ran 49.53 for second place. Eric Cray from the Philippines was third in 49.68.

Ajee Wilson ran out an easy winner in the 800m clocking 2:01.50, more than a second faster than Jamaica’s Jasmine Fray who came home in 2:02.60. Siofra Cleirigh Buttner ran 2:02.71 for third.

Michael Dixon won the 110m hurdles in 13.16 over Ronald Levy, who clocked 13.23. Zaza Wellington ran 13.44 for third.

Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan ran 12.44 for her victory in the 100m hurdles, winning by the proverbial city-block over Costa Rica’s Andrea Vargas, who clocked 12.76 and the Bahamas’ Pedrya Seymour, 12.86.

 

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Related items

  • Four Trinidadians plead guilty in Grenadian court to causing grevious harm to javelin champion Anderson Peters Four Trinidadians plead guilty in Grenadian court to causing grevious harm to javelin champion Anderson Peters

    Four of the six Trinidadians charged last week Friday, August 12, in connection with the assault on Grenada's Anderson Peters, the 2022 World javelin champion, pleaded guilty in the St George's Magistrates Court in Grenada on Monday.

    They are set to return to the St George’s No.1 Magistrates Court on Wednesday facing the possibility of a maximum five-year prison sentence and hefty fines.

    Mikhail John, a 35-year-old sailor, John Alexander, a 55-year-old deckhand, Noel Cooper, 42, the captain of the Harbour Master party boat, and Sheon Jack, a 28-year-old sailor, all pleaded guilty to charges of grievous harm against Anderson Peters and his brother Kiddon.

    Prosecutors dropped the charges against 40-year-old Abiola Benjamin after a review of a video of the incident showed he was trying to separate the men involved in the altercation in which Peters suffered injuries to his ankle, elbow and face and was thrown overboard.

    Meanwhile, 45-year-old sailor Lance Wiggins pleaded not guilty to the charges and was eventually released after prosecutors decided that the evidence against him was insufficient to bring about a successful prosecution.

    Peters, 24, was involved in a brawl aboard the Harbour Master on the night of Wednesday, August 10. Video of the incident showed several men attacking and punching Peters, who had travelled home for a brief vacation after winning the silver medal at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England a few days prior.

    His coach Paul Phillip said the two-time world champion suffered from what appeared to be an ankle sprain as well as bruises to his elbow, neck and face, which put his participation in the Lausanne Diamond League meeting on August 26 in doubt.

    In a statement released on the weekend, the captain of the Harbour Master claimed that it was Peters who was the aggressor and is what triggered the beat-down the elite athlete suffered.

    Peters and his brother were in court Monday and were seated behind the six suspects. Reports indicate that Peters and his brother have retained the services of attorney Derick Sylvester with a view to filing a civil suit against the guilty.

     

  • Harbour Master captain says Anderson Peters was the aggressor in last week's incident Harbour Master captain says Anderson Peters was the aggressor in last week's incident

    Captain of the Harbour Master, Neil Cooper, says Anderson Peters was, in fact, the aggressor in last week’s highly publicized incident on the vessel that led to the arrests of six men involved.

    “It was an attack on the Harbour Master crew…not Anderson Peters,” Cooper said in a statement issued on Saturday.

    The narrative all along was that the crew assaulted Peters, who won his second World title in the Javelin in Eugene last month, and then threw him overboard but Cooper says this couldn’t be further from the truth.

    “On August 10, the crew and I had just successfully sailed the Recovery Cruise. I instructed the deckhand team to begin preparing the boat for our next cruise which was scheduled for 8 o’clock. After some time, I went to check on the crew and saw them asking a group of young men to leave the ship. My team tried encouraging the men to leave but again, the group (who I didn’t know at the time included World Champion Anderson Peters) refused to leave the ship. Anderson began to get aggressive and pace up and down the ramp. I approached him and asked him to leave. He then cursed at me, disrespected my nationality, and insulted me for being Trinidadian. I asked Anderson four times to leave the vessel and each time he responded with aggression and cursed at me.”

    He further stated,” What happened next is where the issue started. While on the ramp, I informed Anderson that I was the captain of the ship. He responded by cursing at me and throwing water in my face. I tried avoiding further altercation by walking away from him, off the ramp and back onto the main deck. When I got there, I realized a member of Anderson’s clan had assaulted my cruise manager, Benji, by slapping him in his face. My crew tried once again to get the men off the boat, but they continued to refuse with aggression. All men continued to curse at us. Anderson then spat at me and began throwing punches at my face. My crew and I did not start the confrontation, Anderson and his group did. As any team would, we defended ourselves from the ongoing attack.”

    Cooper then outlined how Peters ended up in the water.

    “The brawl eventually moved to the ramp. With all the scuffling, Anderson lost his balance and fell into the water. No one threw him into the water! It’s upsetting to see reports that my crew and I threw him into the water. We were relieved to see that Anderson was pulled up out of the water and was safe, but even then, he continued to be aggressive towards us and refused to leave the boat. Eventually, the police arrived on the boat, and a mob gathered outside saying that we attacked Grenada’s National Hero.”

    “In my profession, I make an ode to protecting all souls on every vessel I captain. I would never intentionally harm another human. I understand Grenada’s love for Anderson Peters but I believe the public should know the truth about the situation,” he added.

     

  • Jamaica's big three set to clash over 100m at Diamond League meet in Lausanne, August 26 Jamaica's big three set to clash over 100m at Diamond League meet in Lausanne, August 26

    Could Shely-Ann Fraser Pryce's meet record of 10.60 be on borrowed time when three of the four fastest women in the world this year line up for the 100m at the Lausanne Diamond League meeting on August 26?

© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.