Three track and field meets have been scheduled in 2022 for the Ansin Sports Complex in Miramar, Florida, the training base of Olympic gold medalist Briana Williams and the home for a new life-size statue of the greatest sprinter of all time, Usain Bolt.

Bolt, the eight-time Olympic gold medalist and an 11-time World Champion, owns the world records for 100m (9.58), 200m (19.19) and the 4x100 meters relay (36.84).

The Miramar Invitational (Saturday, April 9, 2022), the Coach O Invitational (Saturday, June 11, 2022) and the NACAC New Life Invitational (Sunday, June 12, 2022) will be held at the complex where the city will pay tribute to the Jamaican and global sprint icon, Miramar Commissioner Alexandra Davis announced via a public statement on Tuesday.

“Artist Basil Watson has been commissioned to create the sculpture in Usain Bolt’s iconic “TO THE WORLD” pose from a position of kneeling on one knee,” Davis said.

 “I proposed the Art in Public Places ordinance to be able to promote art throughout the City.  The sculpture of the international and world-renowned track and field athlete will be funded in part by the Art in Public Places Fund as well as the Art in the Parks capital project.

“It will spur on economic development and serve as an inspiration for up-and-coming athletes of all ages and backgrounds.”

The monument is expected to be ready to be mounted by October 2022.

In 2021, the Ansin Sports Complex hosted two track meets that attracted hundreds of international athletes, more than 5,000 spectators and 30,000 international viewers via live stream.

At the Miramar Invitational that was held on Saturday, April 10, 2021, more than 160 international athletes including Justin Gatlin, Mike Rodgers, Ajee Wilson, Natoya Goule and Grant Holloway.

Akeem Bloomfield, Briana Williams, English Gardner, Kahmari Montgomery, Mike Rodgers, Kendra Harrison, Wil London and Elaine Thompson also participated at the meet.

It was also at that meet that Sha’Carri Richardson set a lifetime best 10.72 seconds to win the 100m. The performance moved her to the sixth all-time in the 100m.

On Saturday, June 5, 2021, the NACAC New Life Invitational- World Athletics featured approximately 200 international athletes, of which over 100 were Olympic qualifying athletes including Zachary Campbell, Jeims Molina and Kaden Cartwright.

It was there that Williams broke her national U20 record running 10.93 seconds before going on to become the youngest Jamaican to win an Olympic gold medal as a member of Jamaica’s 4x100m relay team in Tokyo.

The USA’s Trayvon Bromell also set his personal best and world-leading time of 9.77 seconds at this event.

“We were so thrilled to have welcomed these talented athletes and have them take advantage of the world-class amenities including the FTX Mondo Olympic track at Ansin Sports Complex. We look forward to hosting more international track and field competitions in 2022,” said Davis.

Over his 40-year career, Watson has completed major works in Guatemala, China, Jamaica, and the U.S.  Some of his major commissions include “Ring of Life” in London, “Martin Luther King” in Atlanta and “Cradle-The Future in our Hands” in Fulton County, Georgia.

 

 

When City Commissioner Alexandra Davis received a request for the city to host an auction and fundraiser for Jamaican Olympian Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in October, she jumped at the opportunity.

Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce was the toast of South Florida at the Miramar Cultural Centre in South Florida on Tuesday night at a red-carpet event that also served as an auction and fundraiser for her Pocket Rocket Foundation.

At the event dubbed ‘An Evening with an Olympian’, the four-time Olympian raised thousands of US dollars auctioning a pair of her running spikes, competition gear, a wig, a painting of mother and son by Mark Cameron and a weekend stay at the Altamont West Hotel.

However, the high-points of the evening were the presentation of a Lifetime Achievement Award to the four-time 100m World Champion by Consul General Oliver Mair, the keys to the city of Miramar and Broward County as well as having Alexandra Davis, a City Commissioner for Miramar, declare November 16, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Day.

Consul General Mair told Sportsmax.TV that it was an evening when everything went according to plan and that Fraser-Pryce made it worth the while for all who turned out. She engaged the guests in conversation and took pictures with all who had requested.

“We have many icons that have made Jamaica proud; Marcus Garvey, Bob Marley, Miss Lou, Usain Bolt, Elaine Thompson-Herah, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is among the most decorated athletes of all time and she has done in a most respectable and humble manner,” said Consul General Mair, who presented Fraser-Pryce with the Lifetime Achievement Award.

“Her focus is always looking to empower others. Even in her book ‘The Promise’ she seeks to empower young people. Her foundation was also set up to support others.

“She has been doing this since 2008 in the sport, a woman who has put Jamaica on the world map following in the footsteps of Merlene Ottey and Veronica Campbell-Brown.”

For her part, Fraser-Pryce said she was thankful for the turnout and support she received for her foundation.

“Thank you to those in attendance especially the individuals that supported the auction,” she said in a Facebook post on Wednesday.

“I cannot forget those persons that donated despite not being able to attend. As more is poured into me, the more I will continue to pour out to others. This is how we create lasting change for generations to come.”

Since 2008, when she became the first Jamaican woman to win an Olympic 100m title, Fraser-Pryce has gone on to create a legacy as arguably the greatest female sprinter in history. She won Olympic 100m titles in Beijing in 2008 and again in London in 2012 and is one of only four women to do the same – Wyoma Tyus (1964, ’68), Gail Devers (1992, ’96) and Elaine Thompson-Herah (2016, ’21).

Along the way, Fraser-Pryce also won four 100m World titles (2009, 2013, 2017 and 2019) as well as a 200m title in 2013.

This past summer, Fraser-Pryce added to her already rich legacy when she won a silver medal in the 100m at the Tokyo Olympics, becoming the only woman to win medals in the Olympic 100m for four consecutive Games.

She added a third Olympic gold medal to her trophy case as a member of Jamaica’s 4x100m relay team that won in a national record 41.02, the third-fastest time ever.

Her work off the track has also been extraordinary. Through the Pocket Rocket Foundation, she has provided scholarships to scores of student-athletes enabling them to complete their high school education and to pursue tertiary education.

She has also hosted an annual Christmas treat for the children of Waterhouse where for the past few years she has also staged a six-a-side football competition aimed at maintaining peace within the under-served community.

Meanwhile, Consul General Mair said he was thankful to Jamaican-born elected officials in South Florida for their support of the event notwithstanding the short notice they had, explaining that they have always been supportive of similar ventures that are beneficial to the Diaspora.

Tokyo Olympics relay gold medalist Briana Williams was among several persons honoured with Heritage Awards in Sunrise, Florida on Sunday. The 19-year-old Olympian was recognized for her youth leadership and her broader influence across the globe.

Elaine Thompson-Herah won both the 100 and 200m at the inaugural NACAC New Life Invitational in Miramar, Florida, on Saturday.

American Trayvon Bromell will square off against Jamaican Yohan Blake in the men’s 100 metres dash at the inaugural North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC) New Life Invitational.

Reigning double Olympic sprint champion Elaine Thompson-Herah headlines a large field of world-class athletes down to compete at the inaugural North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC) New Life Invitational this Saturday at the Ansin Sports Complex in Miramar, Florida.

Natalliah Whyte was well pleased with her 100m outing at the Miramar South Florida Invitational on Saturday but she is hoping that she will go much faster as the season progresses. Whyte was third in 11.16 behind runaway winner Sha’ Carri Richardson, who ran a jaw-dropping 10.72s, the fastest time in the world this year.

The 23-year-old Jamaican, who ran the lead-off leg for Jamaica’s gold medal-winning 4x100 relay team at the World Championships in Doha in 2019, had run even faster in the preliminary round clocking 11.07s, her season-best.

However, taking the two races together, Whyte said she was happy with the overall performance.

“The first 100 metres of the season after not competing or doing much due to Covid this time last year, and with a time of 11.07 in the heats and 11.16 in the finals, I am satisfied,” she told Sportsmax.TV following her race.

She explained that the races were meant to provide her and her coach with indicators of what her progress is this season.

“It’s really just taking each race at a time and finding out my weak points and working on those so I can put everything together to get that perfect race,” said Whyte, who trains with Puma MVP International at their base at the Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

“I was hoping to go faster in the final run but, as I said, the race wasn’t perfect but there is still room for improvement. It’s the first race of the season and I think everything will come together as I move forward.”

Whyte did not compete indoors during the winter but does not believe it had any impact on her performances outdoors where she has run two 200m races recording times of 22.88 and 23.28 on March 20 and April 4, respectively.

“Not competing indoors doesn’t give you that early push that pushes you into outdoor. So basically, just training doesn’t give you a true benchmark of where you would want to be,” she explained.

“Competing with world-class athletes is what really sets the standard for what to work on and to just see where you are in your progress. So this meet was a great meet. It had a lot of world-class athletes so it was a true test of progress.”

Having run both short sprints so far this season begs the question, does she plan to compete at both at the Olympic this summer should she qualify at her national championships set for June? Whyte said it’s too early to say.

“Both events complement each other so at the moment I am using each event to get better at the other. The 200m really helps with speed endurance but eventually, when it gets closer to that time, my coach and I will decide based on how the season progresses, what will be best,” she said.

“At the moment, I am delighted for the opportunity to compete. I haven’t run the 200 consistently for the past few years so I am just trying to familiarize myself with the event again. So it’s really a learning process as I go along.  I am also trying to stay injury-free, which is my number one goal.”

Commenting on Richardson's phenomenal time, Whyte said: "Richardson's run was spectacular, she’s a very talented athlete."

 

World long-jump champion Tahjay Gayle and silver medalist Danielle Thomas-Dodd were the only winners on a day of mixed results for Caribbean athletes at the Miramar South Florida Invitational at the Ansin Sports Complex on Saturday.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn was shocked at the time she ran to win the 200m at the Florida Invitational “Pro Addition” meeting on Saturday.

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