Anderson believes 100m hurdles world record will dip below 12 seconds one day

By July 26, 2022

Jamaican 100m hurdler Britany Anderson believes someone will go below 12 seconds in the event one day.

Anderson, who won her maiden national title in June, took home her first global medal when she won 100m hurdles silver at the recently concluded World Athletics Championships in Eugene.

She ran a new personal best and national record 12.31 in the semi-finals on Sunday before returning to run a wind-aided 12.23 to claim second in the final later that day behind Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan who ran an insane wind-aided 12.06 for victory, hours after setting a new world record 12.12 in the semi-finals.

2015 World champion Danielle Williams previously held the national record of 12.32 which she set in 2019.

“I’m feeling really great. I’m excited that I came out here and did my best. It’s really great, the crowd is great and the energy out there is amazing,” Anderson said in a post-race interview.

She also revealed that it wasn’t a perfect race for her despite the fast time.

“The middle of the race wasn’t the best because I kept hitting the hurdles but thank God I finished with a medal,” she said.

The track at Hayward Field in Eugene has long been known to produce extremely fast times, an experience Anderson now knows first-hand.

“It’s definitely one of the fastest tracks I’ve run on. All I can say is we were blessed to have the perfect conditions, even though the time in the finals was wind-aided,” she said.

With the world record now standing at 12.12, “most definitely,” was Anderson’s response when asked if she thinks someone will go under 12 seconds in the 100m hurdles.

“The girls are really competitive so anything can happen. The hurdles has been so competitive these last few years. The girls have shown up and shown out and we can do so much more. The event, to me, is one of the best out here because it’s so technical. We have to keep the stride and the focus while going so fast,” Anderson said.

“I feel like we’re getting more control over our technique,” she added.

 

 

Bradley Jacks

Bradley Jacks is a budding journalist and an avid sports fan. His love of research and sports has led him to SportsMax.tv, a place where those passions work hand in hand to allow him to produce content.

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