Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce aims to bolster race preparedness ahead of final Olympics

By November 06, 2023
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will be gunning for a third Olympic 100m gold medal in Paris. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will be gunning for a third Olympic 100m gold medal in Paris.

 Wary of the competition she's likely to face in her last Olympic Games in Paris next year, two-time Olympic 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is planning to participate in more races before heading to Europe for her final showdown.

 A knee injury and undisclosed physical challenges kept Fraser-Pryce from competing in many races leading up to the 2023 World Championships in Budapest in August, possibly contributing to her third-place finish in the 100m. As the only woman to medal in the 100m at four consecutive Olympic Games, she ran 10.77, a time insufficient to outpace the newly crowned World Champion ShaCarri Richardson of the United States, who finished in 10.65, breaking Fraser-Pryce's championship record of 10.67 set just a year earlier in Eugene, Oregon.

 Shericka Jackson, a gold medal favourite heading into Budapest, secured silver with a time of 10.72, 0.07s slower than her time at the Jamaica national championships in July.

 Recognizing the need to run faster in Paris, Fraser-Pryce understands that more races are essential in preparation for the ultimate showdown.

 "Yeah, for sure. Not only race sharpness but race confidence is something I definitely need. This year, I didn't have a choice not to race due to setbacks in my knee and other issues, and I didn't want to risk it," she shared with Sportsmax.TV. "So, I trusted my coach's judgment. Next year, once I'm healthy, I really want to start earlier and build that race momentum as I head into the Olympics."

 Fraser-Pryce believes that being healthy and competing in more races is crucial because the Olympics, as the pinnacle of sports, is where everyone brings their 'A' game.

 "The Olympics are so different. For some reason, athletes find a unique energy and motivation to come prepared. I want to ensure I give myself the best opportunity to represent myself."

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Related items

  • Nikisha Pryce expresses gratitude for memorable finish as she ‘signs off’ on collegiate career in record-breaking style Nikisha Pryce expresses gratitude for memorable finish as she ‘signs off’ on collegiate career in record-breaking style

    In an extraordinary display of athleticism, Nikisha Pryce capped her collegiate career in spectacular fashion, being crowned NCAA National Division 1 400m champion on Saturday. Pryce, representing the University of Arkansas, achieved a lifetime best of 48.89 seconds, setting a new standard as the fastest time ever run by a collegiate woman.

    This remarkable performance also established a new Jamaican national record, making Pryce the first Jamaican woman to run the 400m under 49 seconds. Her time was the world-leading mark this year until American Sydney McLaughlin Levrone ran 48.75 seconds at the New York Grand Prix on Sunday.

    The achievement was part of a larger triumph for the University of Arkansas Women's team, which claimed the national title. Pryce, alongside teammates Kaylyn Brown, Amber Anning, and Rosey Effiong, completed a historic 'super sweep' by securing the top four places in the 400m finals. The quartet later shattered the collegiate record in the 4x400m relay with a time of 3:17.96, cementing a dominant victory and a memorable conclusion to their NCAA season.

    On Tuesday, Pryce took to Instagram to reflect on her incredible journey and express her gratitude. "As my college athletic career came to a close, I couldn’t have asked for a better finish. It was a moment I will never forget, and it was the perfect way to end my time as a college athlete. Looking back on all the hard work and dedication I put into my sport over the years, I felt proud and grateful for the memories I had made along the way," she shared.

    Pryce continued, "It was a fitting conclusion to a collegiate chapter of my life that I will always cherish. I want to take a moment to express my gratitude to @razorbacktfxc @capt_johnson and each and every member of our college track team. It has been an incredible journey filled with hard work, dedication, and unforgettable moments. I am so grateful for the support and encouragement that you have all shown me throughout my time on the team. Thank you for pushing me to be the best athlete I could be and for always believing in me. I will cherish the memories we have made together on and off the track forever. Thank you for being a part of my college track experience and for making it truly special."

    Pryce's record-setting 48.89 seconds and her contributions to the 4x400m relay marked significant milestones in her career. "48.89, 400m Collegiate Record Holder, 4x400m Collegiate Record Holde, Jamaican National Record Holder??," she proudly posted, signing off with, "Signing Out ~ N. Pryce."

    Looking ahead, Pryce is expected to sign a professional contract soon as she prepares to compete at Jamaica's national championships later this month. Her sights are set on securing a spot on her country's team for the 2024 Paris Olympic Games, a goal that now seems well within her reach given her recent performances.

    Pryce's collegiate career may have come to an end, but her legacy at the University of Arkansas and in the realm of collegiate athletics will endure, inspiring future generations of athletes to reach for greatness.

     

  • Cuban-born Jordan Diaz Fortun produces third-longest triple jump in history to win gold at European Championships Cuban-born Jordan Diaz Fortun produces third-longest triple jump in history to win gold at European Championships

    Cuban-born Spanish triple jumper Jordan Diaz Fortun produced a spectacular performance to win triple jump gold on day five at the European Championships in Rome on Tuesday.

    The 23-year-old, who switched allegiance from Cuba to Spain in November 2022, produced a championship record and world-leading 18.18m to take gold ahead of Portugal’s Pedro Pablo Pichardo and France’s Thomas Gogois.

    Diaz Fortun led the competition after the first round with a 17.56m jump before Pichardo, who also switched allegiance from Cuba in 2017, produced the world’s first 18m jump since 2021 with 18.04m to take the lead in the second round.

    The Spaniard’s next two efforts were 17.82m in the second round and 17.96m in the fourth round after a third-round foul, finding himself just short of Pichardo’s mark heading into round five.

    In that fifth round, he produced what is now the third-longest triple jump of all time with a breathtaking 18.18m, only trailing Christian Taylor’s 18.21m and Jonathan Edwards’s world record 18.29m.

    Diaz Fortun’s jump also established a new European Championship record, eclipsing Edwards’s 17.99m set back in 1998.

    Pichardo’s next three best jumps after his monstrous 18.04m in round two were 17.55m in round three, 17.47m in round five and 17.92m in round six.

    Gogois produced a personal best 17.38m in the sixth round to secure the bronze medal.

      

  • NCAA Championships 100m runner-up Brianna Lyston shuts down 2024 season NCAA Championships 100m runner-up Brianna Lyston shuts down 2024 season

    Louisiana State University (LSU) sophomore Brianna Lyston has decided to shut down her 2024 season meaning she will not compete at the Jamaican National Championships from June 27-30 at the National Stadium in Kingston.

    The 20-year-old announced her decision in an Instagram post on Sunday after competing at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Championships at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon.

    “Thank you 2024, Breezy signing out,” she said.

    This marks the end to an excellent second collegiate season for the former St. Jago and Hydel High standout.

    Lyston enjoyed a perfect indoor season, going unbeaten in eight 60m races from January 27-March 9.

    That included titles at both the SEC Indoor Championships as well as the NCAA Indoor Championships as well, establishing a personal best 7.03 at the latter.

    Her season then moved outdoors where, in her first two 100m races of the season on March 30 and April 20, she produced wind-aided times of 10.87 and 10.84 at the Battle on the Bayou and the LSU Alumni Gold, respectively.

    A month later at the SEC Championships, Lyston ran a personal best 10.91 to win the 100m title and 22.37 to finish fourth in the 200m.

    Lyston secured 100m silver at the recently concluded NCAA Championships with a wind-aided 10.89 but she failed to advance to the final of the 200m after running 22.76 to finish fifth in her semi-final.

    She also ran the opening leg on LSU’s silver medal-winning 4x100m quartet.

     

© 2023 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.