Coaches from several sports turn out in record numbers for JOA's 'high-level' course

By Sports Desk March 07, 2021

A record number of coaches across the spectrum of sports have responded to the call of the Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) in respect of a hi-level coaches' course, which will be delivered by Panam Sports in partnership with the Canadian Coaching Association.

 More than 70 stakeholders have registered their commitment to pursue the course, which will cover Coaching Philosophy and Leadership, Advanced Performance Planning, Energy Systems and Physiology, Strength and Conditioning, Sports Psychology, Advanced Injury Prevention and Recovery Strategies and High-Performance Analysis.

 The call by JOA is in keeping with its developmental strategies of which education and training are critical elements. In a communique to member federations and stakeholders concerning the course, JOA President, Christopher Samuda, made clear that the game plan of the governing body is "to build capacity for today's feats and tomorrow's legacies".

 The course is part of a suite of educational courses that the apex body is continuing to make accessible to stakeholders and supports the Advanced Sports Management Course (ASMC) which the JOA will, for the first time in its history, make available to a cohort in the Diaspora.

 There has never been a response of this magnitude by the sporting fraternity to any of its coaching initiatives.

In applauding the tremendous response to the coaches' course and the ASMC - which continues to be over-subscribed - JOA Secretary General/CEO, Ryan Foster, said: "Our members and stakeholders have not only seized the JOA's vision of the value of education and training but have embraced the known principle that an investment in education pays the best dividends in your working life and is your pension in your twilight years."

The national association for Olympic and non-Olympic sports is driven in creating and investing in lifelong skills and knowledge-based and technically equipped stakeholders. 

Samuda, in commenting on the strategic direction of JOA, stated: "The creation of a sports industry demands a physical and socio-economic infrastructure that is based on viable investments in the human capital and not on hand-outs, for the latter creates a dependency while the former promotes independence and mastery."

 Mastery, in the various disciplines of sport, is the business of the JOA which quite recently also made two calls for opportunities in pursuing master's degrees. The Master of Arts (MA), a postgraduate degree in Sports, Ethics and Integrity, and the Master of Sport Administration (MSP), a postgraduate degree in organizational management, sports marketing and research, are both tenable at international universities.

They will inaugurate an initiative that the JOA has branded ‘Olympic EduPower’ that will provide masters and doctoral educational opportunities for members and stakeholders in empowering them.

 “If sport is to become a sustainable business then the mind must first have and make an educated appointment with destiny, which the body will then be conditioned to keep it," said Samuda.

 Reflecting on Foster's comment last month when announcing that the JOA's pioneering Internship Programme, Samuda said it “is all about self-actualisation and a personal call to own your future in sport”.

 The Internship Programme is currently underway at Olympic Manor, the headquarters of the JOA.

 The JOA will create Olympic history locally, and arguably globally when later this year it makes its Internship Programme available to Jamaicans in the Diaspora. It will also in the second quarter of this year, through its educational ‘Stamina’ forum series roll-out, in collaboration with international federations, customized courses for administrators and coaches as part of its investment in education.

 

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    The Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) has unveiled its management team for the 2024 Paris Olympics, emphasizing a blend of managerial expertise, athletic insight, and a commitment to athlete welfare. After a rigorous selection process, the JOA is confident that this team will effectively lead Jamaica's athletes in Paris.

    Leading the team as Chef de Mission is the esteemed Ian Kelly, OD. Known for his extensive background in sports, particularly football management, Kelly brings a wealth of experience and a well-decorated resume to the role. His leadership will be pivotal in ensuring the smooth operation and success of the Jamaican delegation in Paris.

    Supporting Kelly is celebrated Olympian and global track icon Donald Quarrie, CD. Quarrie, who has managed and mentored numerous teams over the years, will oversee the track and field contingent. His first-hand experience as an athlete and mentor will provide invaluable guidance to the competitors.

    The team also includes accomplished businesswoman Donna Kaye-Sharpe, whose administrative prowess spans across various sports, including cycling and triathlon. Kaye-Sharpe's deep understanding of sports administration will be crucial in managing logistics and operations during the games.

    Kaydeen Webley, a Marketing Campaign and Brand Experience Strategist, joins the team, bringing her expertise in information and events management, as well as athlete welfare and development. Webley's skills will be instrumental in enhancing the overall experience for athletes and ensuring their needs are met efficiently.

    Evon Faulkner, a network specialist at the Central Bank and an experienced figure in regional games management, adds further strength to the team. Faulkner's role as tournament director for multiple international darts championships demonstrates his capability in handling large-scale sports events, making him a valuable asset for the Paris Olympics.

    Rounding out the team is Dr. Leroy Harrison, Consultant Neurologist at Kingston Public Hospital and former president of the Jamaica Neurology Society. As Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Harrison will provide essential medical support, ensuring the health and well-being of the athletes.

    The JOA's commitment to broadening the pool of managers for national assignments is evident in this diverse and highly qualified team. By incorporating professionals from various fields, the JOA aims to offer a holistic support system for Jamaica's athletes.

    The management team's multifaceted credentials, ranging from business and sports management to medical expertise, position them well to navigate the challenges of the Olympic Games and support Jamaica's athletes in their quest for excellence on the world stage.

    With this formidable team in place, the JOA is poised to make a significant impact at the Paris 2024 Olympics, continuing its tradition of excellence and dedication to the Olympic movement.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • “We got taught a lesson”: van der Dussen credits Windies for dominant performance in T20I series “We got taught a lesson”: van der Dussen credits Windies for dominant performance in T20I series

    South Africa stand-in Captain Rassie van der Dussen gave his West Indian counterparts all the praise in the world after his side suffered a dominant 0-3 defeat in their three T20Is from May 23-26 at Sabina Park in Kingston.

    The hosts won last Thursday’s first encounter by 28 runs, their biggest win over South Africa in T20Is, and followed it up with a 16-run win in the second game on Saturday and a dominant eight-wicket triumph in the third match on Sunday.

    The skipper put the South African performance down to an inability to quickly adapt to the conditions of the Sabina Park pitch.

    “We just couldn’t adapt early enough. Yes, we had a long week in terms of layovers in Miami and so forth. I think we saw that in the first match but you can’t keep making the same mistakes,” van der Dussen said after Sunday’s game.

    “I think we just got taught a lesson on how to play in Caribbean conditions, especially from a bowling front. It was a difficult wicket to bat on. I think they just out-skilled us, especially with the ball,” he added.

    When asked about positives he could take from the three games, he singled out openers Quinton de Kock and Reeza Hendricks as well as young leg-spinner Nqaba Peter who played the last two games, the first two T20Is of his career.

    The 35-year-old, who was left out of South Africa’s squad for the upcoming T20 World Cup, says an adjustment he hopes the team makes with the bat is to take a few more chances up front.

    “Maybe just be a bit braver. We saw the way the West Indies play, especially in the power play. They really take it on and when the ball’s newer, it’s easier to score than in the back end when the ball gets soft,” he said.

     

  • Series secured: Chase, Motie star to lead West Indies to 16-run win over South Africa in second T20I at Sabina Park Series secured: Chase, Motie star to lead West Indies to 16-run win over South Africa in second T20I at Sabina Park

    Roston Chase and Gudakesh Motie played starring roles to lead the West Indies to a 16-run win over South Africa and an unassailable 2-0 series lead at Sabina Park in Kingston on Saturday.

    The hosts, after winning the toss and batting first, made an imposing 207-7 from their 20 overs on a much-improved Sabina Park pitch.

    Stand-in Captain Brandon King, who stood out with a top score of 79 in the first T20I, got the ball rolling quickly on Saturday with a 13-run third over off the bowling of Anrich Nortje, who South Africa brought in for this game in place of Gerald Coetzee.

    Johnson Charles, playing his 50th T20I, once again failed to make any inroads with the bat as he was first to fall, caught in the deep off the bowling of Bjorn Fortuin for seven.

    Kyle Mayers joined the skipper and the pair brought the score up to 51-1 at the end of the first powerplay with King 35* off 20 balls and looking set for another big one and Mayers on nine from seven balls.

    Unfortunately for the hosts and the Sabina Park crowd, King’s knock didn’t last much longer as he became the first T20I wicket for debutant Nqaba Peter when he was caught at long on for 36 in the seventh over.

    Peter got his second wicket not long after when Mayers, after hitting a six the ball before, became the third West Indies batsman to get out caught in the deep. He made a 16-ball 32 including two fours and three sixes. The score at the time of his wicket was 83-3 with one ball left in the ninth over.

    At the halfway point, the hosts were 88-3 with Roston Chase and Andre Fletcher at the crease on 10 and three, respectively.

    The pair then batted beautifully to put on a further 56 in short time before Fletcher fell for 29 to leave the West Indies 139-4 with five overs left.

    Not long after, Chase brought up an excellent maiden T20I fifty with a flat six over mid-wicket off Lungi Ngidi in the 17th over. His milestone came off 30 balls.

    The 19th over proved to be the most crucial for the West Indies as a trio of sixes from Romario Shepherd brought the score past the 200 mark before he fell off the last ball of that over for 26 off just 13 balls.

    In the end, Chase finished 67* off just 38 balls including seven fours and two sixes.

    Peter was the pick of the South African bowlers with 2-32 from his four overs while Ngidi and Andile Phehlukwayo took 2-41 and 2-51 from their respective four over spells.

    The start from South Africa then had Sabina Park silent as openers Reeza Hendricks and Quinton De Kock absolutely hammered the West Indian bowling around the park on the way to an opening partnership of 81 in the first five overs.

    The last ball of that fifth over proved to be the start of the West Indian fightback as De Kock took one risk too many and was bowled by Akeal Hosein for 41 off just 17 balls including four fours and as many sixes.

    Three balls later, one became two for the Windies as Reeza Hendricks, who made 87 in the first game on Thursday, was dismissed by Chase for 34 to leave the tourists 83-2 at the halfway point of the sixth over.

    Ryan Rickelton and Matthew Breetzke then added a further 30 before the latter went for an ill-advised second run and was run out thanks to a brilliant throw from the deep mid-wicket boundary by Shamar Joseph for 12 off the penultimate ball of the 10th over.

    Rickelton was next to go, caught off the bowling of Romario Shepherd for 19 to leave the score at 124-4 off 12 overs.

    Not long after, Andile Phehlukwayo fell to another brilliant piece of fielding from Joseph, this time a catch in the deep off the bowling of Gudakesh Motie for three to leave the South Africans reeling at 138-5 in the 15th over.

    Any chance South Africa had of pulling off the chase was dashed when Gudakesh Motie dismissed both Rassie Van Der Dussen (30) and Wiaan Mulder (9) in the 17th over.

    In the end, South Africa reached 191-7 from their 20 overs, 16 runs short of their target.

    Motie ended with 3-22 from his four overs while Shepherd bowled a crucial spell with 1-21 from his four.

    Chase, who was named man of the match, completed a fine all-round performance with 1-26 from his four overs.

    Chase says the team has eyes on a series sweep.

    “Obviously we’ve started the series well being 2-0 up but three is better than two. I just think it’s for us to look at some of the areas where we were weak today and plan to execute them better tomorrow and improve on the areas we did well in as well,” he said.

    “The guys have been playing some good cricket, we just had a camp in Antigua and we’ve put in a lot of hard work so it’s just for us to come out and execute and mostly, enjoy the cricket. I think once you go out there to enjoy the cricket, it becomes a lot easier and takes a bit of pressure off of you so it’s just to go out there and have fun,” he added.

    The third T20I is set for Sunday.

     

     

     

     

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