Jamaica Paralympic Association hosts regional sports training in Boccia and Track & Field

By Sports Desk February 23, 2024
(From left) - Mr. Christopher Samuda - President, JPA, Mr. Winfield Boban, Director, JPA, Mr. Neville Sinclair, O.D. - Director, JPA, Ms. Tamara Feanny Green - Public Relations, JPA, Mr. Edmund Jones - Director, JPA, Mrs. Suzanne Harris-Henry - Secretary General, JPA, Ms. Sodia Peters - Technical Delegate, World Para-Athletics, Ms. Kerona Salmon – Athlete, Mr. Christopher Bourne – Athlete, Mr. Theodore Thomas – Athlete, Mr. Jahmarley Richards – Athlete, Mr. Dennis Samuels - Technical Manager, JPA, Ms. Ann Marie Smith - Sports Administrator, JPA, Dr. Shari St. John - Medical Doctor, JPA (From left) - Mr. Christopher Samuda - President, JPA, Mr. Winfield Boban, Director, JPA, Mr. Neville Sinclair, O.D. - Director, JPA, Ms. Tamara Feanny Green - Public Relations, JPA, Mr. Edmund Jones - Director, JPA, Mrs. Suzanne Harris-Henry - Secretary General, JPA, Ms. Sodia Peters - Technical Delegate, World Para-Athletics, Ms. Kerona Salmon – Athlete, Mr. Christopher Bourne – Athlete, Mr. Theodore Thomas – Athlete, Mr. Jahmarley Richards – Athlete, Mr. Dennis Samuels - Technical Manager, JPA, Ms. Ann Marie Smith - Sports Administrator, JPA, Dr. Shari St. John - Medical Doctor, JPA

The Jamaica Paralympic Association (JPA) will be hosting the Regional Sports Training for Boccia, and Track and Field, scheduled for March 13 -15, 2024.

The training, to be conducted under the guidance and expertise of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), is designed to provide technical and skills-training support to top para-athletes and their coaches, technical staff and referees.

Attendees will come from Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, and Barbados Bermuda, Grenada, Guyana Haiti, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and the US Virgin Islands.

The objective is to effectively prepare participants for representing their countries in future competitions.

“Historic,” was the word used to describe the initiative by Jamaica Paralympic Association President, Christopher Samuda.

“It is the first time an IPC training session for coaches and technical officials in two sports is being held simultaneously in the Caribbean for regional stakeholders,” Samuda said at a press conference at the Jamaica Olympic Association headquarters in Kingston on Friday.

“Where is this leading us? Establishing Jamaica as a hub for regional and international technical training and capacity building and the forum next month will be a driver,” he added.

The activities will conclude with the Velocity Fest on Saturday, March 16, 2024, at the National Stadium, where athletes will showcase their newly acquired skills.

This will also be the first time in the history of the Paralympic movement that a world certified technical official will preside over the meet. That world certified technical official is Sodia Peters.

“This has always been a dream of mine and to see it become a reality, I am very happy. I’m very elated to represent Jamaica at the highest level,” said the World Para-Athletics Technical Delegate.

“I want to be the first of many and I want to impart the knowledge that I’ve garnered to ensure that we are living up to the international standards here in Jamaica, not only producing world class athletes but we need world class officials, technical delegates and coaches in Jamaica as well,” she added.

This will be the second consecutive year that para-athletes will be competing at the Velocity Fest.

More than 20 para-athletes will be participating in the meet in areas such as long jump, shot put, the sprints and the 400m.

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