Grenadian Javelin World Champion Anderson Peters is convinced the upcoming edition of the tournament in Eugene, Oregon will be an open affair with several men capable of winning the title.

On Thursday, Peters threw 90.31 to win the event at the Stockholm Diamond League meet, ahead of Olympic champion Neeraj Chopra of India who recorded 89.94 for a new personal best and national record.  Germany’s Julian Weber was third with 89.08 and The Czech Republic’s Jakub Vadlejch, who has thrown the second-longest distance this season, was fourth.

It is Peters who has put together the most impressive resume this season, however, holding the world lead of 93.07 and winning 8 of 11 events he has taken part in so far.  The thrower, however, believes he is yet to discover his best form and admits he is not yet fully fit.

“I am not really in a great shape - I have suffered a back injury. It is still getting better but I hope to be back in really good shape soon,” Anderson said following the meet.

“Getting the 90m throw was really good, I was very much motivated by Neeraj to get a 90m throw because he started the competition with a PB and a NR and that was pretty good for the start,” he added.

Ahead of the event in Oregon, the thrower is hoping to be in top shape.

“I am thinking about it - not having the minor injuries and I hope when I am like 100 percent fit, I want to see what the result would be. When I am able to get the technique, to get the rhythm, and my body would be 100 percent ready, I really want to see the result,” Peters said.

“The more I compete, the better I become…In Eugene, it will be anybody´s game”

Former 100m World Champion and world’s second-fastest man Yohan Blake has not quite given up on the idea of returning to dominate sprinting, despite an underwhelming performance at the Tokyo Olympics last year.

The 32-year-old Blake was once considered the heir apparent to celebrated compatriot Usain Bolt.  In fact, it is Blake that still holds the second-fastest times over both the 100 and 200m sprints.  Devasting injuries, which happened to the sprinter in the 2013 and 2014 seasons, however, largely curtailed that promise and left the sprinter unable to step into the void.  In a barren stretch of results, Blake has gone without a medal since the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Since the 2012 Olympics, the athlete has finished outside of the medals at the last four major championships and failed to make the final at the last two. 

Despite the lack of success in recent seasons, however, Blake is feeling confident of a late-career revival this season, on the back of a decent showing at the Birmingham Diamond League last week.  The Jamaican finished second in the men's 100m, clocking 10.18 behind Canadian Aaron Brown who took top spot in 10.13.

“I think I took it too easy at the end and didn't see the guy in lane 8. I was focused forward. It was challenging because it was cold. The two false starts were tough but I am used to dealing with these things. I am feeling good after coming back. I want to stay hard to beat and move from being second fastest in the world to be fastest,” Blake said following the race.

“I have been here before and I am used to the pressure. I am looking forward to the trials and getting back to my best and challenging the American top sprinters. I have done it before and can do it again.”

Despite once again re-writing the record books, Jamaica sprint queen Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce admits she was not expecting to clock such a fast time.

On Saturday, at the JAAA Destiny Series, in Kingston, Fraser-Pryce ran the fastest women’s 100m time since Florence Griffith-Joyner set the world record 33 years ago. 

The multiple-times Olympic and world champion stopped the clock at 10.63, moving her second on the list of the fastest times in history.  The time, which obliterated her previous national record of 10.70, is only bettered by Griffith-Joyner’s 10.49.

“I was just making sure that I had a good run before the National Championships, because I don’t have any more races before that.  I was just looking forward to putting in a solid race,” Fraser-Pryce said following the event.

“I was focused on getting my technique and everything together ahead of the national championship.  So, in terms of the 10.6, I really wasn’t expecting it to be honest and maybe that was a good thing,” she added.

Heading into her final Olympics, Fraser-Pryce had insisted that she would prioritise running fast times, having already won several gold medals.  The race was the athlete’s fourth over the distance this season, having opened with a fourth-place finish at the Diamond League meet in Gateshead.  In Doha last week, she recorded the then 3rd fastest 100m time this season after crossing the line first in 10.83.

 

 

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