Men’s 4x400 Metres Relay

Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago both advanced to the final.

The Trinidadian team consisting of Deon Lendore, Jereem Richards, Machel Cedenio and Dwight St. Hillaire ran a season’s best of 2:58.60 to finish 3rd in heat 1 and progress.

Jamaica fielded a team of Demish Gaye, Jaheel Hyde, Karayme Bartley and Nathon Allen to finish 2nd in heat 2 with a season’s best time of 2:59.29 to advance.

 

Women’s 400 Metres

The Caribbean secured two medals in the women’s 400 metres.

Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas successfully defended her title from the 2016 Games by winning gold in a personal best 48.36, the 6th fastest time ever in the event.

 

She was followed by Marileidy Paulino of the Dominican Republic who took silver in a national record 49.20.

Allyson Felix of the USA became the most decorated female track athlete in Olympic history by finishing 3rd and securing her 10th Olympic medal, one more than Jamaican legend Merlene Ottey.

Jamaicans Stephenie-Ann McPherson and Candice McLeod finished 4th and 5th in 49.61 and 49.87 respectively.

Cuba’s Roxana Gomez started the final but unfortunately failed to finish, pulling up injured about 100 metres into the race.

 

Women’s 4x100 Metres

The Jamaican quartet of Briana Williams, Elaine Thompson-Herah, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson celebrated Jamaica’s Independence Day by running a national record of 41.02 to secure the gold medal.

This marks Jamaica’s first time winning Olympic gold in women’s 4x100 metres relay since Athens 2004.

Javianne Oliver, Teahna Daniels, Jenna Prandini and Gabby Thomas combined to run 41.45 to secure the silver medal for the USA, while Great Britain with Asha Phillip, Imani Lansiquot, Dina Asher-Smith and Daryll Neita ran 41.88 for bronze.

 

Men’s 4x100 Metres

Jamaica finished 5th in the final of the men’s 4x100 metres relay.

Jevaughn Minzie, Julian Forte, Yohan Blake and Oblique Seville combined to run 37.84 to finish behind Italy, Great Britain, Canada and China.

 

The Italian team of Lorenzo Patta, Lamont Marcell Jacobs, Fostine Desalu and Filippo Tortu ran a national record 37.50 to secure gold and continue the country’s impressive track & field showing in Tokyo.

The British team comprising of CJ Ujah, Zharnel Hughes, Richard Kilty and Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake ran 37.51 to finish just behind the Italians in 2nd.

Aaron Brown, Jerome Blake, Brendon Rodney and Andre De Grasse combined to run 37.70 and secure the bronze for Canada.

Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson continues to send clear signals that she will be a force to be reckoned with in the sprints this Olympics, after registering a convincing win over the Bahamas’ Shaunae Miller-Uibo, at the Gyulai István Memorial meet, on Tuesday.

Jackson, who was formerly a 400m specialist, stepped down to the shorter distances this year and has had impressive results.  The sprinter clocked new personal bests of 10.77 and 21.82 last month at her country’s national championships.

In Hungary, on Tuesday, the runner continued in that vein, dismissing the field to finish first in 21.96.  Jackson seized control of the race early and comfortably held off a typically fast-finishing Miller-Uibo, who took second in 22.15.  Dafne Schippers, the 2017 World Champion, was third in 22.70.

In other action, both Caribbean athletes in the men’s 110m hurdles failed to secure a podium spot.  Jamaica’s Ronald Levy finished fourth with a time of 13.25 and Shane Brathwaite was 7th in 14.10.  The race was won by the United States’ Grant Halloway who took the top spot with a time of 13.08.

In the women’s 400m hurdles, Jamaica’s Janieve Russell took third in a season’s best 53.68.  The race was won by Netherland’s Femke Bol in a meet record 52.81.

Shaunae-Miller-Uibo, the 2016 Olympic 400m champion has been registered to run both the 200m and 400m this summer, despite an unfriendly schedule.

Bahamian Olympic Champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo has admitted to having minor injury setbacks over the last few weeks but insists her Olympic preparations remain on track.

At the weekend, Miller-Uibo looked in great shape as she cruised to victory at the Adidas Boost Boston Games, in the women’s 200m straight.  In the rarely contested event, the athlete led wire to wire before cruising to the line in 22.08, which was 0.32 seconds ahead of second-place finisher Kortnei Johnson.

The time was a personal best for Johnson, who was closely followed by compatriot Wadeline Jonathas in her personal best of 22.57.

Trinidad & Tobago’s Michelle-Lee Ahye was also in the mix with a season’s best 22.62 and fellow Miller compatriot Tynia Gaither next in 22.96.

“It was a bouncy track, and I love a bouncy track.  It was a pretty easy and comfortable run,” Miller-Uibo said following the event.

“The last few weeks, we’ve been dealing with a few minor injuries, but we’re getting through it and just taking everything one step at a time,” she added.

The athlete could contest either the 400m, which she won at the Rio Olympics or the 200m where she has the fastest time in the world this season.

Shaunae-Miller-Uibo had another impressive outing in what is becoming an outstanding season when she won the 200m straight run at the Boost Boston Games on Sunday. The imperious Bahamian was among several Caribbean athletes including Natoya Goule, Michelle-Lee Ahye and Jereem Richards, who were victorious at the meet held in the streets of Boston.

Miller-Uibo, who has yet announced whether she will be defending her 400m title in Tokyo or step down to the 200m in which she has the world-leading time, destroyed the field to win in 22.08.

The USA’s Kortnei Johnson was second in 22.40 and Wadeline Jonathas third in 22.57.

The men’s event went to Canada’s Jerome Blake, who ran a personal best 19.89 defeat Zharnel Hughes, who also ran a personal best of 19.93. Third was Aldrich Bailey Jr of the USA, who clocked 20.45.

Goule outsprinted long-time rival Ajee Wilson to win the 600m in a national record and world-leading time of 1:24.77. Wilson clocked 1:25.007 for second place while Allie Wilson ran 1:25.270 for third.

Trinidad’s Michelle-Lee Ahye, who was fourth in the 200m, had a better showing in the Women’s C 100m that she won in a season-best 11.22. Kristal Awuah of Great Britain was second in 11.46 leaving Trinidad’s Kelly-Ann Baptiste to settle for third in 11.56.

The Women’s B 100m was won by the USA’s Kiara Parker, who clocked a season-best 11.07. Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore ran 11.18 for second while the USA’s Hanna Cunliffe was third in 11.23.

Aleia Hobbs ran 11.05 to win the A final in an American sweep. Gabby Thomas was second in a season-best 11.16 with Morolake Akinosun running 11.17 for third.

Isiah Young ran a season-best 9.94 to win the Men’s 100m over compatriot Noah Lyles who clocked 10.10. They finished ahead of Jamaica’s Nickel Ashmeade, who ran 10.17 for third.

Meanwhile, Richards the Commonwealth Games 200m champion, ran 14.75 to win the 150m ahead of Yohan Blake, who clocked 14.940 for second. The USA’s Andrew Hudson also clocked 14.940 but was given third.

Barbados’ Shane Brathwaite ran 13.71 to finish second in the 110m hurdles that was won by the USA’s Grant Holloway in 13.20. Hungary’s Valdo Szucs was third in 13.72.

Among the youngsters, 17-year-old American phenom Erriyon Knighton won the Adidas Future Stars Men’s 100m in a fast 10.16 beating a Jamaican trio of Ryiem Forde (10.18), Jelani Walker (10.34) and Michael Stephens (10.35).

Shian Salmon won the 200m hurdles 24.86 beating USA’s Shamier Little (24.91) and Ronda Whyte (25.71), who were second and third, respectively.

 

 

 

 

 Shaunae Miller-Uibo believes she and her training partner Chrisann Gordon-Powell are in a good place following their respective season-opening races in the 400m yesterday.

 The Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) has confirmed that it will not send a team to World Athletic Relays, set to take place in Chorzow, Poland, next month.

According to reports, the association like many has been affected adversely by the COVID-19 pandemic and was forced to give up on having a team at the event due to a lack of athletes able to participate.

Bahamian superstars Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Steven Gardiner, through their representatives, indicated that they would not be willing to travel outside of the United States due to ongoing coronavirus pandemic and travel protocols.

“We didn’t have athletes who are available to compete,” President of the BAAA Drumeco Archer told The Bahamas Tribune.

“Shaunae (Miller-Uibo) and Steven (Gardiner) camp indicated that they have decided not to travel outside of the US because of COVID-19,” he added.

“And a lot of our elite athletes are still in university and college, who are not going to be released from their duties. So, we thought it would be prudent for us not just to take a team for the team’s sake. If we’re going to take a team, we will take a team that will have an impact.”

Earlier this week, another top Caribbean sprint nation, Jamaica, announced that it would not participate in the event due to the difficulty of travel and COVID-19 restrictions.

The Bahamas were hosts to the first three editions of the tournament.

Bahamian sprint queen Shaunae Miller-Uibo threw down the gauntlet to would-be challengers over the 200m on Sunday when she sped to a world-leading 22.03 run with a trailing wind of 1.5m/s at the Pure Athletics Spring Invitational in Clermont Florida.

Bahamian Olympic champion, Shaunae Miller-Uibo, set a new national record to claim the women’s 400m at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix on Saturday.  

The 26-year-old looked in imperious form as she hurried from the blocks and hardly seemed to let up, in the end, claiming the event by a comfortable margin.  Miller-Uibo stopped the clock at 50.21, well clear of second-place Waldine Jonathas of the United States, who was second in 51.95, and Jessica Beard who finished third in 52.60.

In the less frequently contested men’s 300m, Jamaica’s Christopher Taylor also set a national record but was second behind Jereem Richard who clocked a speedy 32.17.  The USA’s Kahmari Montgomery finished third in 32.96.

Jamaica’s Briana Williams clocked 7.22 to qualify for the women’s 60m final but did not face the starter for the final.  The event was won by Kayla White in a personal best of 7.15, with Hannah Cunliffe second in 7.17 and Candace Hill third in 7.19.

In the women’s 60m hurdles, Jamaica’s Britany Anderson finished outside of the top three spots, with a time of 7.99.  The event was taken by Keri Harrison in a world-leading 7.82, with Tiffany Porter second in 7.89 and Gabrielle Cunningham third in an identical time.

Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Jereem Richards pulled off impressive victories at the second meet of the American Track League this season in Fayetteville, Arkansas earlier today.

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