The anticipation for the 2024 Racers Grand Prix is reaching new heights as a stellar lineup of women athletes prepares to grace the track on Saturday, June 1, at the National Stadium. 

Since its inception in 2016, the Racers Grand Prix has become a cornerstone of the local track and field calendar, achieving World Athletics Continental Tour Silver status and attracting top-tier talent from around the globe. 

In the highly anticipated Women's 100m event, all eyes will be on the dynamic showdown between Julien Alfred and Alana Reid. Alfred, known for her explosive speed and technical prowess, is set to challenge the competition with her relentless drive for victory. Meanwhile, Reid brings a wealth of experience and determination, making her a formidable contender on the track. Reid is the Jamaican junior record holder for the women's 100m. 

Sports analyst and lead commentator of the Racers Grand Prix, Ricardo Chambers, when asked about predictions for the women's 100m said,

“This should be an interesting race. Julien Alfred hasn't competed since she finished 4th in 11.15 (+3.5) at the Texas Invitational on April 27. One of the women who beat her that day is the USA's Celera Barnes who is in this field. Alana Reid has been competing a lot. She's already run 8 100-metre races this year but has dipped under 11.20 only once. This is the time of year you expect especially the US and Jamaican athletes to start tapering for their trials, so I expect to see a much truer reflection of the form these athletes are in. Given how things have gone this season, there's no clear favourite and so the intrigue sets up a real fine race.” 

Shifting the focus to the Women's 100m Hurdles, fans can expect an exhilarating clash between Megan Tapper, Ackera Nugent, and Devynne Charlton. Tapper's agility and precision over the hurdles have earned her accolades on the international stage, while Nugent's emerging talent and raw speed make her a rising star to watch. Charlton, with her seasoned experience and strategic approach, adds depth to the competitive field, setting the stage for an unforgettable race. 

Commenting on the lineup of women athletes, Devon Blake, CEO of Racers Grand Prix, stated, "The women's events at this year's Racers Grand Prix exemplify the strength, talent, and dedication of female athletes in track and field. We are proud to showcase their exceptional skills and fierce competitiveness, contributing to the event's status as a World Athletics Continental Tour Silver meet." 

The Women's events at the Racers Grand Prix promise to deliver thrilling moments of athleticism, determination, and sportsmanship, highlighting the diversity and excellence of women's track and field. The action-packed matchups hit the track on June 1 as these remarkable athletes take center stage and inspire fans worldwide. 

The success of the Racers Grand Prix is made possible by the generous support of its esteemed sponsors. Leading the pack is Adidas, a longstanding partner whose commitment to excellence aligns perfectly with the event's ethos. The Sports Development Foundation's continuous partnership has been instrumental in elevating the meet to new heights year after year. KFC, Gatorade, JN Bank, Digicel, and Airport Authority of Jamaica (AAJ) bring their unique expertise and resources to enhance the spectator experience and showcase Jamaica's vibrant sporting culture on a global stage.

The stage is set for a thrilling showcase of athletic prowess as the 2024 Grenada Invitational gears up to welcome a star-studded lineup of track and field talents. Hometown heroes Kirani James and Anderson Peters, alongside the incomparable Elaine Thompson-Herah, lead the pack of 100 athletes confirmed to compete at the prestigious event, slated to take place on Thursday, June 6, at the Kirani James Stadium in Grenada.

The excitement surrounding the meet was palpable as it was officially launched on Thursday at the Radisson Grenada Beach Resort in St. George's. The presence of Olympic champions and world-class athletes promises an electrifying atmosphere for spectators and competitors alike.

Joining the illustrious lineup are Commonwealth Games 110m hurdles champion Rasheed Broadbell, set to make his season debut, and Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper. Their participation adds further depth and excitement to an already stacked field of competitors that will also include Grenada’s Olympic hopefuls quarter-miler Melenie Rodney, sprinter Halle Hazzard as well as decathletes Linden Victor and Kurt Felix. Both decathletes will participate in the long jump and 100m events.

The meet will also herald the celebration of a significant milestone—the 40th anniversary of Grenada's first participation in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles in 1984. To honor this occasion, all 51 athletes who have represented the country at the Olympics over the past four decades will be celebrated and honored at a special ceremony scheduled for 6:00 pm on the day of the event.

The festivities are set to kick off at 4:30 pm with national segments featuring local athletes across various age categories, from U13 to U20. This segment serves as a platform to showcase the budding talent within Grenada's track and field community and underscores the nation's commitment to nurturing the next generation of athletic stars.

As the sun sets and the international segment commences at 7:00 pm, spectators can expect nothing short of top-tier performances from some of the world's most elite athletes. From sprints to hurdles, jumps to throws, the Grenada Invitational promises a spectacle of athletic excellence that will captivate audiences and leave a lasting impression on the global track and field stage.

The meet organizers say the full cast of athletes competing at the meet will be revealed over the next two weeks.

Track & Field fans around the world will be treated to an exciting clash in the women’s 100m hurdles at the season’s opening Diamond League meet in Xiamen on Saturday.

Jamaica’s two-time World champion, Danielle Williams, will take on newly crowned World Indoor 60m champion and record holder, Devynne Charlton, as well as 2021 Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper.

World record holder Tobi Amusan and reigning Olympic champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn are also set to line up on Saturday along with Americans Alaysha Johnson and Masai Russell.

The field is completed by Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji, 2022 World Indoor champion Cyrena Samba-Mayela and China’s Yanni Wu.

Reigning Olympic champion Hansle Parchment will compete alongside countryman Orlando Bennett in the 110mm hurdles.

Bajan two-time World Championship bronze medallist Sada Williams will line up in the 400m alongside Guyana’s Aliyah Abrams.

Bahamian Anthonique Strachan will take on some of the world’s best in the 200m.

Finally, Jamaica’s World Indoor 60m bronze medallist Ackeem Blake, 2011 World 100m champion Yohan Blake and reigning national 100m champion Rohan Watson will all line up in the 100m against a stacked field including the likes of American world champions Christian Coleman and Fred Kerley.

 

In a breathtaking and ground-breaking performance Thea LaFond won gold in the women’s triple jump at the 2024 World Athletics Indoor Championships in Glasgow, Scotland on Sunday.

The 29-year-old Dominican stunned her rivals and herself when she uncorked a remarkable world-leading 15.01m to win and become the first woman from the Caribbean to achieve that distance indoors and the first from Dominica to win a global gold medal.

LaFond, who achieved a lifetime best of 14.90m at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest last year to finish fifth, uncorked her historic performance on her second attempt in Glasgow stunning the audience and her rivals. She stared at the mark in disbelief before shedding tears of joy in front of her husband and coach Aaron Gadson.

With the gold medal all but secured, LaFond passed on her remaining jumps but watched as Cuba’s Leyanis Perez Hernandez provided a scare when she unleashed a jump of 14.90m to claim the silver medal. The Cuban had a big jump on her final attempt but it was deemed a foul, which sent LaFond skipping away joyfully at winning her first-ever global championship.

Spain’s Ana Peleteiro-Compaore' won the bronze medal with her effort of 14.75m

Earlier, world-record holder Devynne Charlton easily advanced to the semi-final round of the 60m hurdles. The Bahamian barely broke a sweat in winning the third of the six heats in 7.93. Her compatriot Charisma Taylor also advanced one of the six fastest losers. Taylor was fourth her heat in 8.05.

Megan Tapper from Jamaica was an automatic qualifier after she was third in her heat in 8.05.

Jamaica ran well to advance to the final of the 4x00m relay. The quartet of Junelle Bromfield, Andrenette Knight, Charokee Young and Leah Anderson ran a season-best 3:27.35 to finish second, an automatic qualifying spot in the second of two heats that was won by Great Britain who ran a national record of 3:26.40.

Gold medal favourites, the Netherlands (3:27.70) and the USA (3:28.04) are also through to the final.

 

 

 

Ackeem Blake and Sashalee Forbes will lead Jamaica's contingent to the World Athletics Indoor Championships in Glasgow, Scotland. Jamaica will compete in the 60m, 60m hurdles, 400m, 4x400m relay, 800m, long jump, triple jump and shot put at the championships set to run from March 1-3.

Blake, the second fastest Jamaican ever,  will be Jamaica's sole competitor in the Men's 60m while Forbes and Briana Williams will contest the 60m dash.

Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper is the lone female in the 60m hurdles. Tyler Mason and Damion Thomas will go in the men's event. Giano Thomas is named as the reserve.

Meanwhile, Stacey-Ann Williams and Charokee Young will take on the world's best in the Women's 400m. Rusheen McDonald will run the two-lapper for the men.

Williams and Young are also named among the relay squad that includes Junelle Bromfield, Stephenie-Ann McPherson, Andrenette Knight, Leah Anderson and Lanae-Tava Thomas.

In the field, Carey McLeod and Tajay Gayle have been selected to contest the long jump competition with Kimberly Williams will take on the triple jump.

Daniniel Thomas-Dodd and Rajindra Campbell will throw the shot put.

Former JAAA president Dr Warren Blake is the team manager with Maurice Wilson being the Technical Director.

Wilson will have on his coaching staff Reynaldo Walcott, Paul Francis, Orville Byfield and Mark Elliott.

 

 

In a display of explosive speed and flawless execution Bahamian Devynne Charlton set a new world record in the 60m hurdles at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York on Sunday.

Racing against a stacked field that included world champion Danielle Williams and former world leader Tia Jones and last season’s NCAA 100m hurdles champion Ackera Nugent, Charlton exploded from the blocks and surged to the lead early. She flashed across the line in an astonishing 7.67 a new world record and national record. She broke the previous record of 7.68 held by Sweden's Susanna Kallur since 2008.

Williams, whose focus is on the Paris Olympics this summer, ran a season-best 7.79 for second place with Jones clocking the same time for third.

Nugent also ran a season-best 7.80 for fourth place in the keenly contested event.

Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper was seventh in a personal best 7.98.

 

Bahamian sprinter Anthonique Strachan was the only Caribbean winner at the Astana Indoor Meet for Amin Tuyakov Prizes-a World Athletics Indoor Tour-Gold meet, in Kazakhstan on Saturday.

The 2012 double sprint World Junior champion ran 7.21 for victory in the women’s 60m. She finished just ahead of Poland’s Magdalena Stefanovicz (7.22) and Iran’s Farzaneh Fasihi (7.23). Jamaica's Tina Clayton ran 7.28 in sixth.

Reigning Jamaican National 100m champion Rohan Watson ran 6.65 for fifth in the male equivalent won by the USA’s Demek Kemp in 6.55. The Japanese pair of Shuhei Tada and Akihiro Higashida ran 6.58 and 6.59 for second and third, respectively.

The meet’s most impressive performance came in the women’s 60m hurdles where Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan, coached by Jamaican Lacena Golding-Clarke, produced an African record 7.77 to win ahead of two-time World Indoor champion Nia Ali (7.89) and Ireland’s Sarah Lavin (7.91). Jamaica’s Megan Tapper and Amoi Brown were fifth and eighth with times of 8.03 and 8.11, respectively.

The women’s 400m saw Jamaica’s Stephenie Ann McPherson finish second overall with a time of 54.66. The event was won by Portugal’s Catia Azevedo in 52.64 while Japan’s Nanako Matsumoto was third overall with 54.79.

Tokyo Olympics 100m hurdles  bronze medalist Megan Tapper has inked a major three-year sponsorship deal with the luxury all-inclusive Jamaican-born super brand, Sandals Resorts International. The AC Hotel Kingston, on Friday, hosted the contract-signing ceremony held with Sandals’ Executive Chairman, Adam Stewart, Tapper, members of her family and some of her closest supporters.

Tapper gained recognition during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, becoming the first-ever Jamaican female athlete to clinch an Olympic medal in the 100-metre sprint hurdles. However, it wasn't just the two-time Olympian's athletic prowess that won hearts, but also her effervescent personality that captivated many Jamaicans, including Sandals' executive chairman.

“I think it is fair to say that Megan is a reflection, through her smile, of what Jamaica’s soul represents. Her achievements on the world stage speak for themselves, but the way she conducts herself, the way she inspires the next generation, the way she brings to life the feeling of Jamaica through her smile and how she acts and carries herself is something that Sandals Resorts International wanted to be associated with. We love superstars, and we love standing on the world stage ourselves. We love boasting about everything Jamaica is and can continue to be, and I saw a reflection of our company in Megan,” Adam Stewart stated, as he welcomed the Olympian to the Sandals’ family.

Stewart expressed that Tapper and athletes like herself continue to vividly demonstrate that Jamaica is more than “likkle but tallawah.”

 

He described Jamaican athletics as a password that propels the country’s approximate three million people to the world stage, inspiring the international community to want to visit and experience Jamaica’s rich culture, warm people and breathtaking beauty.

“So when you are running, you’re doing so much more than just crossing the hurdles for yourself and for team Jamaica. You’re actually helping the entire three million people have a strong and bold future,” he conveyed to Tapper.

Stewart also proudly declared that Tapper now has the unwavering and enthusiastic support of Sandals Resorts and its expansive army of devoted Jamaicans and Caribbean nationals globally.

Tapper, visibly moved by the Executive Chairman’s sentiments, admitted that she was close to tears and overwhelmed by his extraordinary show of support. She described the sponsorship deal with Sandals as a golden and incredible opportunity, especially as she prepares for the upcoming Summer Olympic Games to be held in Paris, France, this year.

“I am absolutely thrilled to be a part of this partnership with Sandals as I gear up to make my third Olympic team,” a beaming Tapper said. “I can’t wait to soar to new heights and bring the essence of the Caribbean sun and the Sandals smile to every single country that I go to. It’s an incredible opportunity and I am excited to represent such a fantastic brand. I am confident that this will be an unforgettable partnership. This collaboration is an important one because it reiterates that Sandals, though not an apparel brand, supports sport in Jamaica, which, along with tourism, is consistently doing well on the world stage and will obviously continue to do so. I am confident that this partnership will contribute positively towards carrying the brand to new heights,” she added while expressing heartfelt thanks and gratitude to the luxury all-inclusive resort brand.

Over the years, Sandals Resorts International has sponsored sports in Jamaica and the region, including cricket and motorsports. With this latest partnership forged with Tapper, Sandals' Executive Chairman used the opportunity to graciously recognise other Jamaican brands who support local athletics.

 

He extended commendation to companies such as Digicel and cordially called on corporate Jamaica to continue these types of partnerships.

“When you look at Digicel’s stamp on athletics and their commitment to the sport, I think it’s something that cannot be overlooked without expressing gratitude as a Jamaican and a Caribbean national. All the other companies such as Grace Kennedy, that support Jamaican athletics undoubtedly deserve commendation. I just want to encourage those companies that have been around for a long time to continue to support – and the new companies- to hold hands and continue to fight. Jamaica is in a league of its own, do what is right and support Jamaican athletics,” the Sandals boss stated.

World champion Danielle Williams and fellow Jamaican Megan Tapper finished fourth and fifth, respectively, in a fast 100m hurdles races at the Diamond League final in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday.

In a race where the top six athletes all ran under 12.5s, 2022 world champion Tobi Amusan clocked a season-s best 12.33 to hold off a fast-finishing Jasmine Camacho Quinn and former world record holder Kendra Harrison, who clocked 12.38 and 12.44, for second and third, respectively.

Williams, who was among the early leaders clocked 12.47 with Tapper close behind in 12.48, the same time as the USA’s Alaysha Johnson.

 

Danielle Williams made it two wins from two starts on Sunday since her medal exploits in Budapest after hurdling to a comfortable victory at the ISATF Meeting in Berlin.

The 30-year-old two-time world champion cruised to victory in the 100m hurdles in an easy 12.71. She was well clear of Australia’s Michelle Jenneke, who clocked 12.89 for the runner-up spot. In third was the USA’s Amber Hughes, who crossed the line in 12.98.

The news was not so good for the other Jamaican in the race. Olympic silver medallist Megan Tapper did not complete the event.

However, Williams was not the only Caribbean winner in Berlin on Sunday. Olympic bronze medallist Ronald Levy, who has been making his way back to form after long-term injuries, won the 110m hurdles in 13.45, a season’s best.

Levy got the nod over Just Kwaou-Matthey of France, who was timed in 13.46 in a blanket finish. Italy’s Ndele Simonelli Lorenzo was not far behind in 13.50.

Bahamian star runner Shaune Miller Uibo did not finish her 400m race that was won by Norway’s Henriette Jaeger in a new national record of 51.03.

Meanwhile, Jamaica’s Jonielle Smith was third in the 100m. She ran a time of 11.33 in the race won by the USA’s Jenna Prandini in 11.24 with Belgium’s Rani Rosius finishing just ahead of the Jamaican in 11.32.

Jamaica’s Ackera Nugent and Danielle Williams, as well as Bahamian Devynne Charlton secured their spot in the women’s 100 metres hurdles final, after safely navigating their respective semi-finals on Wednesday’s fifth day of the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

While it was unbridled joy for those three, it was heartbreak for another Jamaican Megan Tapper, as the Olympic medallist placed fourth and her time was not good enough to see her through to tomorrow’s final scheduled for 2:25pm Jamaica time.

Charlton and Tapper both ran from semi-final one, where they placed second and fourth respectively. Charlton, 27, secured the second automatic qualifying spot in 12.49s, behind American Kendra Harrison, who won in 12.33s.

Despite running her heart out, Tapper (12.55s) was out dipped by Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji (12.50s), who progressed to tomorrow’s final as one of the two fastest qualifiers on time ahead of the Jamaican.

The second semi-final was just an exciting with Ackera Nugent leading for most of the way but was pipped on the line by Nigeria’s World Record holder Tobi Amusan. Nugent stopped the clock in 12.60s, behind Amusan’s 12.56s.

The last of the three semi-finals saw Jamaica’s former World Champion Danielle Williams off to a blistering start, but she lost her composure close to the end and had to settle for third in a season’s best 12.50s. Fortunately, for her the time was good enough to progress to the final.

Puerto Rico’s Jasmine Camacho-Quinn produced a late burst to win in 21.41s, with American Nia Ali (12.49s), just bettering Williams on the line.

 

You can catch live action of the 2023 World Athletic Championships by downloading the Sportsmax App.

Ackera Nugent, Devynne Charlton, Danielle Williams and Megan Tapper all progressed to the semi-finals of the 100m hurdles on day four of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Tuesday.

Nugent, the NCAA Indoor and Outdoor Champion, was first up in heat one, producing 12.60 to narrowly win ahead of American Masai Russell who was credited with the same time. Ireland’s Sarah Lavin (12.69) and France’s Cyrena Samba-Mayela (12.71) completed the top four.

2019 World Champion, Nia Ali, ran 12.55 to win the second heat ahead of Poland’s Pia Skrzyszowska (12.65), South Africa’s Marione Fourie (12.71) and Hungary’s Luca Kozak (12.71).

2015 World Champion Danielle Williams and 2022 World Indoor Champion Devynne Charlton both lined up in heat three. Charlton and Williams were second and third with 12.44, a new Bahamian national record, and 12.51, respectively, as the race was won by American former world record holder in a blistering 12.24. Great Britain’s Cindy Sember was fourth in 12.83.

Puerto Rico’s Olympic Champion, Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, was next up in heat four. She continued her unbeaten run this season with 12.50 to comfortably win the heat ahead of the Netherlands’ Nadine Visser (12.68) and Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji (12.71). Celeste Mucci of Australia also made it through with 12.90 in fourth.

Jamaican national champion, Megan Tapper, finished second in the fifth and final heat in 12.51 to advance. Nigerian World Champion and world record holder Tobi Amusan ran 12.49 to win the heat while Australia’s Michelle Jenneke and Cyprus’ Natalia Christofi ran 12.71 and 12.90 in third and fourth, respectively.

Newly minted men’s 100m champion Rohan Watson and defending world champions Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce and Shericka Jackson headline a powerful Jamaican team named Wednesday to represent the country at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

Watson, the surprise winner of the men’s 100m will campaign alongside Ryiem Forde and 2022 World Championship finalist Oblique Seville. Ackeem Blake who just missed out on the top three spots in the 100m has been listed as an alternate but he will be a member of the 4x100m squad that will also include Tyquendo Tracey and Michael Campbell.

Fraser-Pryce will be going for her sixth world title with Shericka Jackson, the reigning national champion in both 100m and 200m, campaigning alongside her. Also down to contest the 100m is Sashalee Forbes and Natasha Morrison.

Briana Williams and Elaine Thompson-Herah have been selected as members of the 4x100m relay team.

Andrew Hudson and Rasheed Dwyer will contest the men’s 200m while Jackson, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Natalliah Whyte and Kevona Davis will take on the 200m. Sashalee Forbes has been named as an alternate for the 200m, presumably on the likelihood that Fraser-Pryce will not go in the half-lap sprint.

The Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) put to rest the likelihood of Rusheen McDonald, who is the fastest Jamaican in the world this year over 400m, contesting the one-lap sprint. McDonald, who has run 44.03 this year, the third fastest time ever run over 400m by a Jamaican man, failed to show up for the semi-finals of the national championships.

Zandrian Barnes has been given the nod, who failed to finish in the top three at the national championships in early July, but has met the qualifying entry standard of 45.00. He will contest the 400m along with national champion Sean Bailey and runner-up Antonio Watson.

Jevaughn Powell, Malik James-King and Demish Gaye will make up the 4x400m relay squad.

Nickisha Price, Candice McLeod and Charokee Young will compete in the 400m for women with Joanne Reid named as an alternate. Janieve Russell, Rhonda Whyte and Shian Salmon will make up the 4x400m relay squad.

Reid, meanwhile, will contest the 4x400m Mixed Relay along with Stacy-Ann Williams, Rusheen McDonald and D’Andre Anderson.

Navasky Anderson, who dramatically met the entry standard of 1:44.70 on the final day for qualification on Sunday, is only male 800m runner named on the team while Natoya Goule and Adelle Tracey will take on the women’s event. Tracey will also compete in the 1500m.

An area of great strength for Jamaica is the sprint hurdles. World leader Rasheed Broadbell, the 2022 Commonwealth Games champion, will lead Jamaica’s hunt for medals along with Olympic champion Hansle Parchment and the fast-rising Orlando Bennett. Tyler Mason has been named as an alternate.

 Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper will lead the charge for the Jamaican women in the 100m hurdles alongside NCAA champion Ackera Nugent, who is making her debut on the senior team, and 2015 World Champion Danielle Williams, who is also the 2019 bronze medallist.

Amoi Brown is selected as the alternate.

Newly crowned senior national champion and World U20 record holder Roshawn Clarke will take on the world’s best in the 400m hurdles along with Jaheel Hyde and Assinie Wilson while Russell, Andrenette Knight and Rushell Clayton, the 2019 bronze medallist, will go in the women’s race.

Salmon is the alternate.

Romaine Beckford is to represent the black, gold and green in the high jump for men with Lamara Distin and Kimberly Williamson set to take on the women’s event.

The impressive teenager Jaydon Hibbert, the world leader in the triple jump, will try to add world title to his World U20, Carifta, NCAA Indoor and Outdoor titles. Two-time World championship silver medalist Shanieka Ricketts will go for a third medal in the women’s event and will be accompanied by NCAA silver medallist Ackelia Smith and Kimberly Williams.

Jamaica’s strength in the field events is further bolstered by the selection of Carey McLeod, Wayne Pinnock and the 2019 World Champion Tajay Gayle for the long jump while Tissana Hickling and Smith will contest the event among the women.

Newly crowned national record holder Rajindra Campbell and Danniel Thomas-Dodd will throw the shot put in their respective events.

Fedrick Dacres, the 2019 silver medalist, national champion Traves Smith and NCAA silver medallist will throw the discus in Budapest with Samantha Hall set to take on the women’s event. Last but certainly not least is the impressive Nyoka Clunis who will throw the hammer at the prestigious event where the world’s best athletes will congregate on August 19, 2023.

 

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Megan Tapper and Rajindra Campbell all secured victories at Saturday’s Meeting de Madrid, part of the World Athletics Continental Tour Silver Series.

Fraser-Pryce, aiming for her sixth World 100m title in Budapest next month, followed up a 10.82 clocking in her season opener in Lucerne on Thursday with a meet record 10.83 effort to win.

Spain’s Jael Bestue was second in 11.10 while Shashalee Forbes, who will also be on Jamaica’s 100m team in Budapest, was third in 11.11.

Olympic bronze medallist and reigning national champion, Megan Tapper, ran 12.69 to win the A Final of the women’s 100m hurdles ahead of the USA’s Tonea Marshall (12.74) and Liberia’s Ebony Marshall (12.81).

The A Final of the men’s 110m hurdles saw Tyler Mason and Orlando Bennett finish fourth and fifth with times of 13.41 and 13.43, respectively. The race was won by Switzerland’s Jason Joseph in a personal best 13.10 ahead of France’s Wilhelm Belocian (13.20) and Spain’s Enrique Llopis (13.35).

Fresh off a 9.99 effort to win in Lucerne on Thursday, Julian Forte produced a season’s best 20.35 for second in the 200m. The race was won by South Africa’s Luxolo Adams in 20.22 while France’s Ryan Zeze was third in 20.52.

In the field, Rajindra Campbell set a new personal best, meet record and national record to win the shot put.

The 27-year-old, who entered the competition with a personal best of 21.31m done in May this year, became the first Jamaican to break the 22m barrier with a throw of 22.22m to win and break the previous national record of 21.96m set by O’Dayne Richards in 2017.

American Roger Steen was second with 21.33m while Nigeria’s Chukwuebuka Enekwechi threw 21.30m for third.

Campbell’s throw is also put him joint-third in the world this year alongside New Zealand’s Tom Walsh. Only Americans Joe Kovacs with 22.69m and Ryan Crouser with his World Record 23.56m have thrown further this year.

After he achieved his previous personal best at the USATF Throws Festival, Campbell told The Jamaica Observer that he was confident he’d achieve the automatic World Championship qualifying standard, 21.40m, at some point during the season.

He then produced throws of 20.23m at the Music City Track Festival and 21.14m at the Arkansas Grand Prix in June.

In July, the former Ferncourt and Kingston College man became a national champion for the first time with 21.04 before, just two days ago, he threw 20.21m in Lucern.

 

 

Sha’Carri Richardson went 2-0 against Shericka Jackson this season after storming to victory in the 100m at the Silesia Diamond League meeting in Poland on Sunday. The American, who remains unbeaten over 100m this season chased down Jackson, nipping the Jamaican at the line to win in a time of 10.76.

Jackson, celebrating her 29th birthday on Sunday and who ran a world-leading 10.65 to win the Jamaican championships a week ago, clocked in at 10.78. Poland’s Ewa Swoboda ran a personal best of 10.94 for third place.

“It was an amazing race, I am really having fun,” an excited Richardson said afterwards.

“The 10.76 - I love the time. I put a great race together. This was a great competition, it was amazing. I executed correctly. I love the atmosphere here. I wish we could replicate this to the US. All the energy, all the love from the audience. I was satisfied with my race altogether.”

It wasn’t a particularly good day for Caribbean athletes nonetheless the eighth Diamond League meeting of the season delivered plenty of outstanding performances considering that the World Championships are less than five weeks away.

Chief among those performances was the meet record 44.08s South Africa’s Wayde Van Niekerk unleased on a quality field in the 400m. Demonstrating his best form since his return from a career-threatening knee injury in 2017, the South African has Brazil’s Alison dos Santos, himself returning from recent knee surgery, for company up to 300m before the 31-year-old Olympic champion went full throttle down the home stretch putting daylight between himself and the rest of the field.

Bayapo Ndori of Botswana finished strong to slip by the Brazilian and crossed the finish line in a personal best 44.61. Dos Santos, the 2022 World 400m hurdles champion settled for third in a season-best 44.73.

Van Niekerk expressed his satisfaction with the race.

“Things are moving in a positive direction. I have been able to train consistently. It is my fastest run in seven years and 44.0 shows that 43 seconds is possible,” he said.

“The competition in my event is getting stronger, so I need to work to get better as well. I do not feel any special pressure, but it is natural for an athlete to want to reach their best possible level. I will be going on to London now and then want to get some good training sessions before the World Championships.”

Earlier, Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek delivered a similarly devastating performance in the women’s race that she won in a new lifetime best of 49.48 which was also a new meet record.  Lieke Klaver of the Netherlands also showed she was in good form heading into the world championships clocking in a time of 49.81, which was just shy of Femke Bol’s previous meet record of 49.75.

Marileidy Paulino, the World Championship silver medalist, uncharacteristically outrun over the first 300 metres, stormed through the field late to finish third in 50.00.

Jamaica’s Candice McLeod ran a season’s best 50.19 for fourth just ahead of Barbados’ Commonwealth Games champion, Sada Williams fifth, also in a season’s best 50.34.

 The 100m hurdles was another thrilling affair that saw World Champion Tobi Amusan winning in a season-best and new meet record 12.34 to edge Kendra Harrison, the former world record holder, who finished second in 12.35.

Newly crowned USA champion Nia Ali ran a time of 12.38 for third place.

Breaking down her performance afterwards, Amusan revealed the challenges she has faced while competing this season.

“It was not easy for me with injuries in my hamstring and my knee. But I trusted in my coach and my work,” said the Nigerian who is coached by Jamaican Olympian Lacena Golding-Clarke.

“It is all about the process. I just won this in a smooth style, I was just running. Honestly, I had no idea that I won when I crossed the finish line.”

In reference to the upcoming world championships, Amusan said she was not looking too far ahead.

“I take it one step after the next. I knew it was going to be a battle until the finish line. I am happy to compete against the best. I am just out here doing well. I came out there I was not feeling too good. About my start - I would not say that I executed, but the second part of the race was really good. I am most definitely building up for the World Championships, extremely satisfied with my season-best, one step at a time.

Jamaican champion Megan Tapper was the best placed Caribbean athlete. She finished fourth in 12.49, her second fastest time ever, after the 12.44 she ran at Jamaica’s National Championships a week ago.  Danielle Williams, the 2015 world champion was fifth in a season-best 12.55.

Natoya Goule has been running well all season and she produced another season-best performance to finish third in the 800m. The Jamaican champion ran 1:57.90 but was not fast enough to get by Uganda’s Hallimah Nakaayi who set a new national record of 1:57.78.

However, both women were outrun by Kenya’s Mary Moraa, who sped a new meet record and season-best time of 1:56.85, which sets her up as a legitimate medal contender in the event at Budapest next month.

American Fred Kerley lost his first 100m this season, finishing second to Akani Simbini in a closely contested race in which 0.02 separated the top four finishers. The South African ran 9.97 to Kerley’s 9.98, which was the same time given to Cameroon’s Emmanuel Eseme.

The USA’s 100m champion Cravont Charleston finished fourth in 9.99.

Yohan Blake, the 2017 World Champion, was fourth in 10.01, his best time this season.

Yulimar Rojas was once again dominant the women’s triple setting a world-leading mark of 15.18m, which was also new meet record and season’s best.

Ukraine’s Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk came late to the party with a leap of 14.70m which gave her second place while bumping Cuba’s Leyanis Perez-Hernandez, second for most of the competition, down to third.

Jamaican champion Shanieka Ricketts’ season-best jump of 14.56m saw her finish fifth while Dominica’s Thea LaFond was sixth with 14.43m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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