Marileidy Paulino stamped her authority as the best female 400m runner in the world for 2023 when she destroyed a talented field to win the one-lap sprint at the Diamond League finale in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday.

The 2023 world champion ran a fast 49.58s to add the Diamond League trophy to her world championship gold medal in what has been an incredible season in which she lost only once all year.

Paulino was almost a second clear of the fast-improving Polish athlete Natalia Kaczmarek, who clocked 50.38 for second place. Lieke Klaver of the Netherlands was not far behind in 50.47.

Jamaica’s Candice McLeod, who looked good for a podium finish after 300m faded to fourth in 50.76 with world championship bronze medallist Sada Williams of Barbados clocking 51.07 for fifth. Aliyah Abrams of Guyana was eighth in 51.97.

World champion Marileidy Paulino of Dominican Republic extended her rich vein of form in the women’s 400 metres with another victory at the Wanda Diamond League meet in Xiamen, China on Saturday.

Paulino, running from lane five, made her move off the curve and swept by Jamaica’s long-time leader Candice McLeod, to stop the clock in 49.36s. McLeod stayed on for second, equaling her season’s best 50.19s.

American Lynna Irby-Jackson (50.45s) was third, as she got by the tiring World Championships bronze medallist Sada Williams (50.95s) of Barbados.

As the curtains fell on the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, the global track and field community bore witness to an unforgettable spectacle of talent, resilience, and passion. For nine consecutive days, athletes from around the world competed under sweltering heat in their pursuit of excellence.

Among these remarkable competitors, it was the athletes from the Caribbean who stood out, earning well-deserved praise from Keith Joseph, President of the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees (CANOC).

In a message released on Friday morning, Joseph expressed his admiration for the outstanding performances of Caribbean athletes, acknowledging their dedication to representing their countries and the region on the world stage.

"The excitement of the athletics competition, once started, never abated," Joseph remarked. "The final event, the women's 4 x 400m relay, saw Jamaica's potential hold on the gold medal slip away, literally in the final strides, much to our collective CANOC chagrin. But this did not detract from the fact that on yet another occasion in the wide and wonderfully exciting world of track and field competition, Jamaica continued to carry the Caribbean cause on its back."

Joseph went on to highlight several standout performances that left an indelible mark on the championships. Shericka Jackson's remarkable victory in the 200m solidified her status as a global star in the sport. Antonio Watson's stunning triumph in the 400m, despite his status as an U23 athlete, showcased the immense potential of the region's younger talents. Danielle Williams added another gold medal to Jamaica's tally with her impressive win in the 100m hurdles.

Joseph also highlighted Hansle Parchment and Wayne Pinnock secured silver medals in the 110m hurdles and long jump, respectively. The women's 4 x 100m and 4 x 400m relay teams also earned silver for Jamaica, while Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce and Rushell Clayton contributed bronze medals to the nation's haul in the 100m and 400m hurdles events.

The president’s praise also extended beyond Jamaica in acknowledging, the Dominican Republic's Marileidy Paulino domination of the women's 400m, while the British Virgin Islands' Kyron McMaster made a triumphant return to form with a silver medal in the 400m hurdles. Barbados' Sada Williams displayed her prowess with a silver in the women's 400m, and Leyanis Hernandez of Cuba secured a bronze in the triple jump.

Cuba continued to make its presence felt in the championships, with Lazaro Martinez and Cristian Urria taking second and third place, respectively, in the men's triple jump. Grenada's Lindon Victor made his mark by earning a bronze in the men's javelin.

Amidst the celebrations, St. Lucia's Julien Alfred emerged as a rising star, placing fifth in the 100m and fourth in the 200m. Dominica's Thea LaFond held her own, finishing fifth in the women's triple jump.

Joseph acknowledged that there were disappointments along the way for some Caribbean athletes, but their spirits remained unbroken. He celebrated the resilience that defines the Caribbean people, inspiring their athletes to give their best, fully aware that they are motivated to go 'beyond possible,' defying every attempt to deter their commitment to success.

 

"The World Athletics Championships are done," Joseph declared. "The performances of our athletes are now indelibly recorded in global athletics history. As CANOC, we stand proud of our athletes, medallists as well as those who missed out. Together, we affirm our commitment to our Caribbean-ness."

With these inspiring performances, Caribbean athletes have once again proven their mettle on the global stage, leaving an enduring legacy of dedication, perseverance, and pride in their Caribbean heritage. Their remarkable achievements continue to inspire and unite the region, setting the stage for even greater success in the future.

 

 

 

 

Marileidy Paulino created history on Wednesday when she stormed to victory in the final of Women’s 400m at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

After winning silver medals at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and again at the 2022 World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, the 26–year-old from Don Gregorio Village in the Dominican Republic blew away the field down the home stretch to clock a massive lifetime best of 48.77 for victory and become the first woman from her country to win a gold medal in that event at the championships that began in 1983.

Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek won silver running 49.57, just managing to hold off Barbados Sada Williams, who ran 49.60 for her second bronze medal in as medal championships.

Williams created some history of her own as no athlete from Barbados had ever won medals in back-to-back championships.

Candice McLeod of Jamaica ran 51.08 for seventh.

Paulino, a two-time silver medalist in the event, took advantage of the absence of Shauna Miller-Uibo and Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone to cop the first global gold medal of her international career.

 



 

Marileidy Paulino, Candice McLeod and Sada Williams all successfully made it through the semi-finals of the Women’s 400m on day three of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Monday.

Paulino, the reigning Olympic and World Championship silver medalist, produced 49.54 to win semi-final one.

Ireland’s Rhasidat Adeleke (49.87) also automatically advanced through to the final from semi-final one while Belgium’s Cynthia Bolingo ran 49.96, a new national record, to advance as one of the non-automatic qualifiers. Jamaica’s Candice McLeod ran 50.62 for fourth to advance as the final time qualifier.

The second semi-final was won by Lieke Klaver in 49.88 while Talitha Diggs also made it through with 50.86. Jamaican champion, Nickisha Pryce, was in a qualifying spot after running a hard first 300m before fading down the stretch and eventually running 51.24 for fifth.

Sada Williams, the defending World Championship bronze medallist, ran a personal best and national record 49.58 for second in semi-final three to advance. Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek ran 49.50 to take the win.

Defending women’s champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo, five months removed from the birth of her first child, failed to advance to the semi-final round of the 400m at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Sunday.

The Bahamian star finished seventh in Heat 3 in 52.65. The 2022 bronze medallist Sada Williams of Barbados won the heat in 50.78 to keep her quest alive for another global medal in the one-lap sprint.

Meanwhile, all three Jamaicans advanced to the semi-final round of the competition. Jamaican champion Nickisha Price comfortably won Heat 4 in 50.38 over Cuba’s Roxana Gomez, who eased to second place in 50.86 and Gabby Scott of Puerto Rico, who was also an automatic qualifier, finishing third in a season’s best time of 51.07.

Candice McLeod was third in the opening heat in 50.37 to earn her place in the semi-final round. That heat was won by medal favourite Natalia Kaczmarek of Poland in an impressive 50.02. Cynthia Bolingo of Belgium ran a season’s best 50.29 to advance.

Charokee Young, meantime, sneaked into the next round as one of the sixth fastest finishers, when she ended up sixth in the sixth and final heat won by gold medal favourite Marileidy Paulino of the Dominican Republic in a smart time of 49.90.

Young struggled to a time of 51.24.

Guyana’s Aliyah Abrahams was not as fortunate. She ran 51.44 to finish fifth in Heat 5 and failed to advance. Ireland’s Rhasidat Adeleke, who recently signed a professional contract, won the heat in 50.80.

 

Sha’Carri Richardson went 2-0 against Shericka Jackson this season after storming to victory in the 100m at the Silesia Diamond League meeting in Poland on Sunday. The American, who remains unbeaten over 100m this season chased down Jackson, nipping the Jamaican at the line to win in a time of 10.76.

Jackson, celebrating her 29th birthday on Sunday and who ran a world-leading 10.65 to win the Jamaican championships a week ago, clocked in at 10.78. Poland’s Ewa Swoboda ran a personal best of 10.94 for third place.

“It was an amazing race, I am really having fun,” an excited Richardson said afterwards.

“The 10.76 - I love the time. I put a great race together. This was a great competition, it was amazing. I executed correctly. I love the atmosphere here. I wish we could replicate this to the US. All the energy, all the love from the audience. I was satisfied with my race altogether.”

It wasn’t a particularly good day for Caribbean athletes nonetheless the eighth Diamond League meeting of the season delivered plenty of outstanding performances considering that the World Championships are less than five weeks away.

Chief among those performances was the meet record 44.08s South Africa’s Wayde Van Niekerk unleased on a quality field in the 400m. Demonstrating his best form since his return from a career-threatening knee injury in 2017, the South African has Brazil’s Alison dos Santos, himself returning from recent knee surgery, for company up to 300m before the 31-year-old Olympic champion went full throttle down the home stretch putting daylight between himself and the rest of the field.

Bayapo Ndori of Botswana finished strong to slip by the Brazilian and crossed the finish line in a personal best 44.61. Dos Santos, the 2022 World 400m hurdles champion settled for third in a season-best 44.73.

Van Niekerk expressed his satisfaction with the race.

“Things are moving in a positive direction. I have been able to train consistently. It is my fastest run in seven years and 44.0 shows that 43 seconds is possible,” he said.

“The competition in my event is getting stronger, so I need to work to get better as well. I do not feel any special pressure, but it is natural for an athlete to want to reach their best possible level. I will be going on to London now and then want to get some good training sessions before the World Championships.”

Earlier, Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek delivered a similarly devastating performance in the women’s race that she won in a new lifetime best of 49.48 which was also a new meet record.  Lieke Klaver of the Netherlands also showed she was in good form heading into the world championships clocking in a time of 49.81, which was just shy of Femke Bol’s previous meet record of 49.75.

Marileidy Paulino, the World Championship silver medalist, uncharacteristically outrun over the first 300 metres, stormed through the field late to finish third in 50.00.

Jamaica’s Candice McLeod ran a season’s best 50.19 for fourth just ahead of Barbados’ Commonwealth Games champion, Sada Williams fifth, also in a season’s best 50.34.

 The 100m hurdles was another thrilling affair that saw World Champion Tobi Amusan winning in a season-best and new meet record 12.34 to edge Kendra Harrison, the former world record holder, who finished second in 12.35.

Newly crowned USA champion Nia Ali ran a time of 12.38 for third place.

Breaking down her performance afterwards, Amusan revealed the challenges she has faced while competing this season.

“It was not easy for me with injuries in my hamstring and my knee. But I trusted in my coach and my work,” said the Nigerian who is coached by Jamaican Olympian Lacena Golding-Clarke.

“It is all about the process. I just won this in a smooth style, I was just running. Honestly, I had no idea that I won when I crossed the finish line.”

In reference to the upcoming world championships, Amusan said she was not looking too far ahead.

“I take it one step after the next. I knew it was going to be a battle until the finish line. I am happy to compete against the best. I am just out here doing well. I came out there I was not feeling too good. About my start - I would not say that I executed, but the second part of the race was really good. I am most definitely building up for the World Championships, extremely satisfied with my season-best, one step at a time.

Jamaican champion Megan Tapper was the best placed Caribbean athlete. She finished fourth in 12.49, her second fastest time ever, after the 12.44 she ran at Jamaica’s National Championships a week ago.  Danielle Williams, the 2015 world champion was fifth in a season-best 12.55.

Natoya Goule has been running well all season and she produced another season-best performance to finish third in the 800m. The Jamaican champion ran 1:57.90 but was not fast enough to get by Uganda’s Hallimah Nakaayi who set a new national record of 1:57.78.

However, both women were outrun by Kenya’s Mary Moraa, who sped a new meet record and season-best time of 1:56.85, which sets her up as a legitimate medal contender in the event at Budapest next month.

American Fred Kerley lost his first 100m this season, finishing second to Akani Simbini in a closely contested race in which 0.02 separated the top four finishers. The South African ran 9.97 to Kerley’s 9.98, which was the same time given to Cameroon’s Emmanuel Eseme.

The USA’s 100m champion Cravont Charleston finished fourth in 9.99.

Yohan Blake, the 2017 World Champion, was fourth in 10.01, his best time this season.

Yulimar Rojas was once again dominant the women’s triple setting a world-leading mark of 15.18m, which was also new meet record and season’s best.

Ukraine’s Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk came late to the party with a leap of 14.70m which gave her second place while bumping Cuba’s Leyanis Perez-Hernandez, second for most of the competition, down to third.

Jamaican champion Shanieka Ricketts’ season-best jump of 14.56m saw her finish fifth while Dominica’s Thea LaFond was sixth with 14.43m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olympic and World Championship silver-medalist, Marileidy Paulino of the Dominican Republic, continued her unbeaten start to the 2023 season by outdueling American 400m hurdles world record holder, Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone, to win the 400m at the Paris Diamond League on Friday.

McLaughlin-Levrone, the reigning Olympic and World Champion and in the 400m hurdles, ran extremely aggressively in the first 300m before Paulino used her experience in the flat 400m to reel her in and cross the line first in 49.12. The American ran a personal best 49.71 for second while 2019 World Champion Salwa Eid Naser ran 49.95 for third.

Elsewhere on the track, Kenyan Faith Kipyegon, who set a spectacular 1500m world record in Florence last week, was at it again, running 14:05.20 to set a new world record in the 5000m. Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey, the previous world record holder, was second in 14:07.94 while her countrywomen Ejgayehu Taye was third in 14:13.31.

Commonwealth Champion, Kyron McMaster, ran a season’s best for fifth in the 400m hurdles.

The BVI native, who fell at the LA Grand Prix on May 27, ran 48.65. The race was won by American CJ Allen in 47.92 ahead of France’s Wilfried Happio (48.26) and World Championship bronze medalist Trevor Bassitt (48.28).

Jamaica’s Natoya Goule ran a season’s best 1:58.23 for third in the Women’s 800m. Keely Hodgkinson took the race in a new personal best, British record and world leading 1:55.77 while American Ajee Wilson was second in 1:58.16.

2011 World 100m champion, Yohan Blake, ran 10.16 for fourth in the Men’s 100m behind reigning 200m World Champion, Noah Lyles (9.96), Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala (9.98) and Botswanan World Junior record holder Letsile Tebogo (10.05).

In the field, Jamaican 2019 World Championship silver medalist Danniel Thomas-Dodd threw 19.25m for fourth in the Women’s shot put behind Portugal’s Auriol Dongmo (19.72m) and Americans Chase Ealey (19.43m) and Maggie Ewen (19.26m).

 

Jamaicans Sean Bailey, Ackeem Blake and the Dominican Republic’s Marileidy Paulino all achieved lifetime bests to come out on top in their respective events on day two of the 2023 USATF LA Grand Prix at the UCLA Drake Stadium in California on Saturday.

The 25-year-old Bailey, younger brother of Olympic and World Champion Veronica Campbell-Brown, produced a career-best 44.43 to chase down Grenadian Olympic and World Champion, Kirani James, who had about a five-meter lead over Bailey heading into the final 100m of the race.

James’s time in second was a season’s best 44.50 while Quincy Hall was third in 45.09.

Paulino, the Olympic and World Championship silver medallist, produced a new national record and world leading 48.98 to win ahead of Salwa Eid Nasser (50.27) and Lynna Irby Jackson (50.38).

Puerto Rican defending Olympic Champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn ran a world leading 12.31 to win the 100m hurdles ahead of Americans Keni Harrison (12.35) and Tia Jones (12.50).

Trinidadian World Indoor 400m Champion and Commonwealth Games 200m Champion, Jereem Richards, ran a season’s best 20.08 for second in the 200m behind Terrance Laird (20.06). Elijah Morrow was third in 20.22.

Moving to the 100m, Ackeem Blake produced a big personal best 9.89 to get a win over Americans Cravont Charleston (9.91) and Christian Coleman (9.91).

American Morolake Akinosun capitalized on the absence of both Sha’Carri Richardson and Marie- Josee Ta Lou from the Women’s equivalent to win in 10.97 ahead of countrywoman Melissa Jefferson (11.07) and Jamaican Junior Alana Reid (11.08).

In the field, 2019 World Championships silver medallist, Danniel Thomas-Dodd, produced a new personal best and national record 19.77m for third in the Women’s shot put. The event was won by the USA’s Maggie Ewen in a personal best and world leading 20.45m ahead of her teammate, Chase Ealy (19.98m).

Two-time World Champion Anderson Peters, won the javelin in 83.16m ahead of Curtis Thompson (75.27m) and Caspers Williamson (75.02m)

 

Sha’Carri Richardson served notice that she might be ready to beat the best in the world in 2023 when she ran a world-leading 10.76 to win the 100m dash against a stacked field at the season-opening Diamond League meeting on Friday.

In the field that included Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson, the 2022 200m World Champion, Dina Asher Smith, Abby Steiner and Melissa Jefferson, Richardson started well and was on Jackson’s shoulder mid-way the race before pulling away to eclipse Jackson’s previous world lead of 10.82.

“I'm so blessed and thankful, I feel at peace,” said Richardson, who broke the previous meet record of 10.80 held by Tori Bowie, who died earlier this week.

“All I do is the best I do and I'm excited to do it. Like I said it before, I had to be kicked out from another 100m race, so I had to do my best no matter what. Peace, love and life.”

The Jamaican finished second in 10.85 while Asher Smith ran season-best 10.98 for third place.

Earlier, Marileidy Paulino of the Dominican Republic, continued her impressive from last season when she won silver at the 2022 World Championships, winning the 400m in 50.51 ahead of American Shamier Little, who ran 50.84.

Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek of Poland ran a season best 51.64 for third place.

World Championship bronze medallist Sada Williams (52.05) and Jamaicans Candice McLeod (53.43) and Stephenie-Ann McPherson (52.93 SB) were fourth, fifth and sixth, respectively.

By her usually high standards Jasmine Camacho-Quinn wasn’t at her best last season but on Friday, she looked like she is getting back to her best while winning the 100m hurdles in a season-best 12.48. The USA’s Alaysha Johnson also ran a season-best of 12.66 for second place with 2019 World Champion Nia Ali finishing third in 12.69.

Jamaica’s Megan Tapper ran a season-best 12.76 for fourth.

In the 400m hurdles, Rai Benjamin held off a fast-finishing CJ Allen to win in 47.78. Allen ran a season-best 47.93 while Wilfried Happio of France finished third in 49.12.

The top seven athletes all set season bests in the men’s javelin but India’s Neeraj Chopra was the best of them all throwing a world-leading 88.67m.

Jakub Vadlejch was second with his effort of 88.63m. World Champion Anderson Peters of Grenada was third with an effort of 85.88m.

Fred Kerley surged late to win the 200m in 19.92, a season’s best. Kenny Bednarek of the USA was second in 20.11 with Canada’s Aaron Brown of Canada taking the final podium spot with 20.20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Yaseen Pérez coach of Dominica Republic quarter mile star Marileidy Paulino has confirmed that the sprinter hopes to target the longstanding 400m world record in coming seasons.

Paulino has had an outstanding 2022, setting national records in both the 200m and 400m.  In addition to that, the 25-year-old athlete claimed a silver medal at IAAF World Championships and ended the season by capturing the Diamond Trophy.  On that occasion, the athlete set another national record and more importantly dipped below the 49-second mark for the first time in her career.

The time of 48.99 marks the athlete the 12th fastest in history.  A fine accomplishment, but approaching the record of 47.60, set, and held for 37 years, by the German Democratic Republic’s Marita Koch is no simple feat.  In fact, the sprinters in the many years since have found it almost difficult to even approach the previous mark of 47.99 set by Czechoslovakia’s Jarmila Kratochvílová in 1983. 

 "That's a dream she has, we both have it. In the end, we are going to keep working. It's a tough thing, but so far everything has been difficult and we have set out on the road to the world record," said Pérez said.  Despite the difficulty, the coach points out the athlete has been taking things stage by stage.

"Next year we are going to try to establish the stability of 48 seconds. This season, we had worked very well to maintain the levels obtained in the Olympic Games and as we worked throughout the year, improving the speed part, we saw what was coming and the time of 48 became a fact. It didn't happen at the world championships because of the disruption of the relays, but we had been working to lower it.”

 

The Dominican Republic’s Marileidy Paulino and Grenada’s Kirani James secured 400m wins at the Diamond League final in Zurich on Thursday.

The 25-year-old Paulino, who took silver at the World Championships in Eugene in July, secured the Diamond Trophy with a brilliant personal best and world leading 48.99.

It was a Caribbean 1-2-3 as her teammate Fiordaliza Cofil ran 49.93 for second while Bajan World Championship bronze medallist and Commonwealth Games gold medallist Sada Williams was third in 49.98.

James, who also took silver at the World Championships, ran 44.26 to win his Diamond Trophy ahead of Americans Bryce Deadmon (44.47) and Vernon Norwood (44.66).

Marileidy Paulino held off a strong challenge from Sada Williams to win the 400m at the Athletissima Diamond League meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland on Friday.

The recently concluded 2022 World Athletics Championships in Eugene saw the Caribbean region grab the opportunity to represent themselves well on a global stage with both hands.

The region took home 17 medals in total including five golds, nine silvers and three bronzes with Jamaica leading the Caribbean medal count with 10 ahead of Grenada and the Dominican Republic who got two each while the Bahamas, Barbados and Puerto Rico all took home one apiece.

There were a number of standout performances throughout the 10 days starting with Jamaicans Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson.

Fraser-Pryce produced a championship record 10.67 to defend her 100m title and win her fifth in total. Fraser-Pryce also won her second 200m medal in her World Championships career, a silver in a season’s best 22.81.

Jackson ran a personal best 10.73 for silver in the 100m behind Fraser-Pryce and followed that up with one of the performances of the championships in the 200m. She produced a time of 21.45 to win her first global title and become the fastest woman alive over the distance.

Double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah came third in the 100m in 10.81 to complete Jamaica's second consecutive 100m clean sweep at a major championship.

Fraser-Pryce, Jackson and Thompson-Herah then teamed up with Kemba Nelson to win silver in the 4x100m in 41.18 behind the USA (41.14).

We now move to the 400m where the Caribbean women swept the medals. Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo became the first female to complete the world event cycle (gold medals at the World Youth Championships, World Junior Championships, World Indoor Championships, World Championships and Olympics) by finally winning her maiden world title with a world-leading 49.11.

The Dominican Republic’s Marileidy Paulino, the world leader coming into the Championships, followed up her silver medal in Tokyo last year with 49.60 to claim silver once more.

Barbados’ Sada Williams produced a brilliant personal best and national record 49.75 to take home bronze, becoming the first Barbadian woman to win a World Championship medal.

In the men’s equivalent, Grenadian superstar Kirani James ran 44.48 for silver behind American Michael Norman (44.30). This was James’ third World Championships medal and first since 2015 when he won bronze.

Paulino was also part of the brilliant quartet that took the Dominican Republic to gold in the Mixed Relay. Paulino combined with Fiordaliza Cofil, Lidio Andres Feliz and Alexander Ogando to run 3:09.82 for gold.

Staying on the track, Jamaica’s Britany Anderson followed up on the promise she’s shown all season to secure a silver medal in the 100m hurdles.

Anderson ran a new national record 12.31 in the semi-finals before running a wind-aided 12.23 to secure the silver medal behind Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan who clocked an astounding 12.06 for victory after running a legal world record 12.12 earlier in the semis.

Puerto Rican Olympic champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn ran the same time as Anderson to take home bronze.

Jamaica picked up silver medals in both the men's and women's 4x400m relays. The men comprising of Ackeem Bloomfield, Nathon Allen, Jevaughn Powell and Christopher Taylor registered 2:58.58 to finish behind the USA (2:56.17) while the women with Candice McLeod, Janieve Russell, Stephenie Ann McPherson and Charokee Young produced 3:20.74 to finish behind the Americans (3:17.79).

In the field, Grenada’s Anderson Peters became only the second man to defend his javelin world title.

The 2022 world leader produced a best throw of 90.54m to successfully defend his title from Doha three years ago, replicating a feat only matched by Czech world record holder Jan Zelezny who won consecutive world titles in 1993 and 1995 before returning to top spot in 2001.

Peters produced an amazing series, registering 90.21m, 90.46m, 87.21m, 88.11m, 85.83m and 90.54m in his six rounds.

Jamaica’s Shanieka Ricketts produced a season’s best 14.89m to take silver in the women’s triple jump behind Venezuelan world record holder and Olympic champion Yulimar Rojas (15.47m).

Ricketts produced jumps of 14.89m, 14.86m, 14.37m, 14.40m, 14.62m and 14.80m for one of her best series of her career.

The region will be hoping for an even better showing at the 2023 World Championships scheduled for August 19-27 in Budapest, Hungary.

 

 

 

 

Tokyo Olympics 400m finalists Shaunae Miller-Uibo, Marileidy Paulino, Candice McLeod and Stephenie-Ann McPherson all advanced to Friday’s 400m finals at the conclusion of the semi-final round of competition at the 2022 World Championships of Athletics at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon on Wednesday night.

Page 1 of 2
© 2023 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.