Trinidad and Tobago athletes who won medals at the recently concluded 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England, will have some extra cash to spend this year under the twin-island republic Ministry of Sports’ Reward and Incentives Framework, according to reports.

Under the programme, cyclist Nicholas Paul and sprinter Jereem Richards will be the primary beneficiaries as both men are responsible for the three gold medals the country won in Birmingham.

Paul won gold in the keirin, silver in the match sprint and bronze in the 1000m time trials and is set to receive TT$437,500 while Richards, who won the 200m title in a Games record 19.80 and anchored the country’s 4x400m relay to the gold medal is set to receive TT$375,000.

According to the Trinidad Guardian, athletes competing in relay team events will earn $125,000 each for a gold medal, $62,500 for silver and for bronze, $31,250. Individual gold medals get a whopping TT$250,000.

That means Dwight St Hillaire, Asa Guevara and Machel Cedenio will each get $125,000 and the members of the 4x100 metres team - Jerod Elcock, Eric Harrison Jnr, Kion Benjamin and Kyle Greaux - will each get $62,500 for their silver medal run.

Ahead of her much-anticipated clash with five-time 100m world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in Monaco on Wednesday, 200m world champion Shericka Jackson has revealed that she has not yet achieved her goal in the 100m.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson and Rasheed Broadbell scored impressive victories in their respective events at the 12th Gyulai Istav Memorial in Hungary on Monday.

The 2022 World 100m champion has made running 10.6s a habit this year following yet another time of 10.67 at the meet where she ran 10.82 to finish second to Elaine Thompson-Herah in 2021.  Back then Thompson-Herah won in a meet record of 10.71.

The 35-year-old Fraser-Pryce eclipsed that record after achieving her fifth time this year under 10.70 seconds having run 10.67 in Nairobi in May, 10.67 in Paris in June, 10.67 in Eugene in July and a world-leading 10.66 in Silesia on Saturday. No other woman in history has run as many times under 10.70s in any one season.

The USA’s Tamari Davis finished second in 10.92 while Switzerland’s Mujinga Kambundji was third in 10.99.

Yohan Blake (10.03) and Ackeem Blake (10.05) were fourth and fifth, respectively in the men’s 100m won by the USA’s Marvin Bracy in 9.97. Trayvon Bromell finished second in 10.01, the same time as Elijah Hall as 0.04 separated second to fifth.

Jackson cruised to victory in the 200m in 22.02 finishing well clear of Kambundji at 22.45 and Kaylia Whyte of the USA, who was third in 22.46. Tynia Gaither of the Bahamas was fifth in 22.63.

Erriyon Knighton won the men’s race in 19.88. Aaron Brown finished second in 20.24. Alexander Ogando was third in 20.46.

Fresh off his Commonwealth Games 110m hurdles title that he won in a championship record of 13.08, Rasheed Broadbell came from behind to edge World Champion Grant Holloway at the line to win the event in 13.12. Holloway was given the same time while Daniel Roberts was third in 13.13.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the hurdles in a slightly windy 12.27 over Kendra Harrison at 12.49 and Nia Ali at 12.60.

Commonwealth Games champion Janieve Russell clocked 54.14 for second place and Rushell Clayton finished third in 54.45 in the 400m hurdles race more than two seconds behind Olympic, World Champion and world-record holder Sydney McLaughlin, who established yet another meet record with her time of 51.68.

 

 

 

 

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce was one of several high-profile athletes to miss the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England.

In July, Fraser-Pryce won her fifth 100m World title with a 10.67 clocking at the World Championships in Eugene. She also won silver medals in the 200m (21.81) and 4x100m. With just a week between the end of the World Championships and the start of the Track and Field program at the Commonwealth Games, Fraser-Pryce explained that the short turnaround wasn’t ideal for her.

“Well, the Commonwealth Games was just never on the agenda for me this year,” 2022’s fastest woman explained in an interview with Mirror. “Especially because I did the double at the World Championships, it took a lot out of me to do, and the 4x100m.”

"So, to come back maybe a week or two after to do another three rounds and possibly two in the 4x100m, my coach said that would probably be too much for me to handle right now if I’m thinking about longevity and wanting to get to Paris 2024, so I had to be strategic about that,” she added.

Jamaica's women 4x400m relay team got an unexpected surprise in the final track event at the Commonwealth Games on Sunday when England's team that crossed the line first in 3:25.83 was disqualified for a lane infringement. They have subsequently filed an appeal.

This means Jamaica's team comprised of 400m hurdles silver medallist Shian Salmon, Junelle Bromfield, Roneisha McGregor and Natoya Goule that ran 3:26.93 will leave Birmingham as 4x400m runners-up.

The development also means Canada has now been crowned 2022 Commonwealth Games champions. They had finished second in 3:25.84. Scotland finished fourth in a season-best of 3:30.15 but has been upgraded to the bronze medal.

 

Trinidad and Tobago won its third gold medal at the 2022 Commonwealth Games on Sunday when Jereem Richards led them to an emphatic victory in the 4x400m.

Kerrica Hill set a new championship record as Jamaica pulled off a 1-2 finish on the final day of the 2022 World Athletics U20 Championships in Cali, Colombia on Saturday, August 6.

On a day when Jamaica celebrated the 60th anniversary of its independence, Hill, the gold-medal favourite uncorked a blistering time of 12.77 to fulfil expectations.

It was her second gold medal of the World U20 Championships as she was a member of Jamaica's 4x100m team that set a world record 42.59 on Friday night.

Her compatriot Alexis James was also impressive securing the silver medal in a new personal best of 12.87. It was her third lifetime best in a matter of days. She ran 13.04 in the heats and 12.94s in the semi-finals.

Hungary’s Hannah Toth ran a national U20 record of 13.00 for the bronze medal.

Jamaica won two more medals on the final day following silver medal runs in the 4x400m relays.

The team of Dejanea Oakley, Abigail Campbell, Oneika McAnuff and Alliah Baker ran a season-best 3:31.59 to finish second to the USA who ran 3:28.06 for the gold medal.

Great Britain (3:31.86) took the bronze.

Jamaica’s men aided by an outstanding anchor leg from Delano Kennedy, powered their way into a podium spot in 3:05.72, finishing behind the USA, who won in a season-best 3:04.47.

Shemar Palmer, Shaemar Uter and Jasauna Dennis were the other members of the team.

Canada finished third in a national U20 record of 3:06.50.

Kennedy was fifth on the final handover and surged past the field to win Jamaica a national record 16th medal of the championships, the most by any team in Cali.

It was the highest number of medals ever won by Jamaica at the World U20 Championships topping the 12 medals won at the 2018 championships in Tampere, Finland.

Jamaica won six gold, seven silver and three bronze medals at the championships, one more than the United States, whose 4x400m victories saw them win seven gold, four silver and four bronze medals.

 

 

  

Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica won sprint relay medals on Sunday with silver and bronze medals, respectively, at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England.

Despite the absence of 200m champion Jereem Richards Trinidad and Tobago’s team of Jerod Elcock, Eric Harrison Jr, Kion Benjamin Hislop and Kyle Greaux raced to a season-best 38.70 to claim second place behind England that ran a season-best 38.35 for the gold medal.

Nigeria ran 38.81 for the bronze.

Meanwhile, Jamaica’s women owe a debt of gratitude to sprint-double champion Elaine Thompson-Herah for their bronze medal as Kemba Nelson, Remona Burchell and Natalliah Whyte were unable to put Jamaica in contention for a medal over the first three legs.

However, at the final exchange with Jamaica in fifth, the fastest woman alive, stormed down the home stretch to snatch the bronze medal from Australia.

Jamaica clocked a relatively pedestrian 43.08, well behind England who ran a season-best 42.41 for the silver and winners Nigeria, who stormed to a new area record of 42.10.

Australia clocked 43.16 for fourth.

Sada Williams created history on Sunday when she became the first Barbadian woman to win a gold medal in the 400m on the penultimate day of the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England.

Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson-Herah successfully completed the sprint double at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games after dominating the women’s 200m on Saturday.

Days after claiming her first 100m title at the Games, the Jamaican stormed away from the field to stop the clock at 22.02 a new Games record.  The sprinter got off to a solid start and nearly covered the field by the curve before pulling away down the stretch.

Nigeria’s Favour Ofili was second in 22.51, with Namibia’s Christine Mboma third in 22.80.  The second Jamaican in the race Natalliah Whyte missed out on the medal podium after finishing fourth in 23.06.    

 

Trinidad and Tobago’s Jereem Richards uncorked a punishing run to successfully defend the men’s 200m title, with a new Games record, at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games on Saturday.

In one of the best performances of his career, Richards ate up the track, and his opponents, to finish near five metres clear in a new personal best of 19.80.

Heading into the final, the talk surrounded a rematch between Richards and British sprinter Zharnel Hughes who finished ahead of the Trinidadian at the last edition of the Games but was disqualified for impeding him, after the athletes’ arms came together.

This time around, there could be no such complaints as the Richards blasted through the first half of the race, came off the curve first, and powered away from the field.  Hughes was second in a season-best 20.12, with Ghana’s Joseph Paul Amoah finishing third in 20.49.

With the victory, Richards became the third athlete to successfully defend the 200m title at the event, behind Jamaican Donald Quarrie and Namibia's Frankie Fredricks.  

Janieve Russell successfully defended her title and Shiann Salmon took silver but a hoped-for clean sweep of the Women’s 400m Hurdles did not materialize at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games on Saturday.

It was South Africa’s Zeney van der Walt who played the role of a party crasher, unfurling a gritty, brilliant late run to deny the third Jamaican measured for the podium, Rushell Clayton, a place on the platform. 

Clayton had looked a lock for the medals early on, even leading the race at the top of the bend, just ahead of Russell.  Even after Russell surged past the three Jamaicans were well clear of the field with five metres to go but nobody saw van der Walt.  Clayton tied up badly just metres from the line and the South African surged past, her late run taking her almost into second spot. 

The Australian finished in 54.47 a new personal best and the same time as Salmon.  Russell finished well clear with 54.14 and Clayton further back in 54.67.

Jamaica high jumper Lamara Distin led an Independence Day assault on the Commonwealth Games medal podium which saw the country claim gold and bronze in the event.

The 22-year-old Distin rebounded from a recent dip in form to claim the top spot with a leap of 195m.  She was joined on the podium by Kimberly Williamson who had a best of 192m, the same as Australia’s Eleanor Patterson, the reigning world champion, but was given the bronze medal on countback.

Distin recorded the winning mark with her seventh attempt, but having wrapped up the competition missed out on setting a new national record at 1.98m.  Williamson successfully cleared 1.92m on her second attempt in round 7.

The finish by Jamaica was the first time the country had registered two athletes on the medal podium for the event.

 

Five-time World 100m Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce ran a world-leading 10.66 for victory at the Silesia Diamond League meeting in Poland on Saturday.

Fraser-Pryce, who won her fifth world title in Eugene recently, got her usual bullet start before proceeding to step away from the field and register her fourth sub-10.7 time this season and sixth overall, more than any other woman in history. American Aleia Hobbs ran 10.94 for second while The Ivory Coast’s Marie-Josee Ta Lou was third in 11.00.

In the men’s equivalent, World Championship semi-finalist Ackeem Blake ran 10.00 for third behind Americans Trayvon Bromell (9.95) and Marvin Bracy (10.00) who won bronze and silver at the recently concluded World Championships in Eugene.

Shericka Jackson, who ran 21.45 to win gold at the World Championships and become the fastest woman alive in the event, won the 200m in 21.84 ahead of Bahamian World 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo (22.35) and American Jenna Prandini (22.39).

Meanwhile, in the Men's 400m Grenada's Kirani James ran a fast 44.55 but had to settle for the runner-up spot as Michael Norman, the 2022 World Champion, claimed victory in 44.11. Bryce Deadmon was third in 44.68.

The women's race was won by the incredible Dutch 400m hurdler Femke Bol, who clocked a personal best of 49.75, a new meet record and national record.

Poland's Natalia Kaczmarek finished second in a personal best time of 49.86. World Championships finalist Candice McLeod was third in 50.22 just ahead of compatriot Stephenie-Ann McPherson who ran 50.31 for fourth.

 

It is public knowledge that Jamaica's prowess in the field events has become known on the global stage and the Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) salutes our champions in the field who are toiling diligently and valiantly in making fertile the soil in sport. 

The 2022 Birmingham Commonwealth Games is witnessing the continued growth and development of the field sports which augurs very well for the future. 

JOA President, Christopher Samuda, in acknowledging the advancement of the field sports stated: "Shanieka Ricketts' admirable performance in accomplishing that gold in the triple jump - her first major title - and in so doing writing her name indelibly in the history book of the Commonwealth Games demonstrates that our footprints go deep and are well established in the sand."  

Travis Smikle, a seasoned campaigner, hurled the discus in Birmingham in securing the bronze medal in the men's event which is well decorated with Fedrick Dacres, our national record holder and former Olympic Solidarity Scholarship recipient, and Chad Wright. O'Dayne Richards, a JOA Scholarship awardee who placed sixth in the finals of the men's shot put in Birmingham, is an experienced soldier with gold medals in his cabinet. 

"We are proud of our women and men in the field events who continue to be an inspiration to generations of youth who aspire to emulate them and who the JOA salute with the greatest of respect" JOA Secretary General/CEO, Ryan Foster, said with evident pride. 

The golden leap of Lamara Distin in the women's high jump and the bronze achievement of Kimberly Williamson in that event are crowning moments for independence. "At a time when we are celebrating independence it is uplifting to know that landmark achievements in various sports are being established as we, in the JOA, pursue our mandate 'sport for all, all for sport" Foster said. 

Kimberly Williams, a celebrated medalist, and a Ackelia Smith, who leapt to a personal best at the games, both represented our nation well in the finals of the triple jump and "exemplify the character and mettle of our national ambassadors who are establishing milestones and creating legacies in sport" Samuda remarked.

 

 

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