The fates conspired against Jamaica’s 100m women and the USA’s Aleia Hobbs took full advantage to win in the blue-ribbon sprint in 10.87 at the Athletissima Diamond League meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland on Friday.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has pulled out of the women´s 100m final due to a muscle sprain she experienced during her warm-up earlier this evening, meet organisers have announced.

The 35-year-old Fraser-Pryce was expected to line up against fellow Jamaicans Elaine Thompson-Herah, Shericka Jackson as well as Marie Josee Ta Lou in the 100m that would also have Americans Aleia Hobbs, Twanisha Terry and Tamari Davis.

The severity of the injury is unknown and it is still too early to tell whether she will be fit in time for the Diamond League final in Zurich in two weeks.

Fraser-Pryce subsequently confirmed her withdrawal on her Facebook account.

"Had some discomfort in my hamstring a couple of days now and unfortunately it doesn’t seem to be getting any better. As a precaution, my coach decided not to risk it at this point," she said. "Will have a few days to get some treatment before Brussels. I’m extremely disappointed that I won’t be able to compete tonight and I’m sure you all are as well. Thanks again for the support and encouragement. No matter how hard we prepare sometimes things just don’t go as planned. The last thing I want to do is gain an injury/ injure myself." 

 

Rasheed Broadbell ran a new lifetime best and took a few big scalps along the way to victory in the 110m hurdles at the Athletissima Diamond League meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland on Friday.

Broadbell, the Commonwealth Games champion, stormed from behind and surged to victory in 12.99, which equalled the season-best time by Grant Holloway, who led early but faded to third in 13.11. Trey Cunningham of the USA was second in 13.10.

Olympic champion Hansle Parchment finished fourth in 13.13.

Broadbell was overwhelmed by the achievement.

"I´m thanking God right now, I will never forget this race, it's my first time under 13 seconds and I´m very happy for it," he declared.

"Everyone comes here to do their best, so I just focus on my own race and try to execute what I have practised in training. I started my season with injuries but as you can see, as the season is progressing, it's getting better and better. New training camp, much better results, the proof is there. I am happy with how things are going right now."

 

Jamaica’s Janieve Russell and Andrenette Knight took second and third places, respectively, in the opening track event at the Athletissima Diamond League meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland on Friday.

The race was won by the imperious Dutch athlete Femke Bol in a new meet record of 52.65.

The third Jamaican in the race, Rushell Clayton, fell late and did not finish.

Bol, who won the rare 400m hurdles/400m double at the recent European championships in Germany proved too strong for the field pulling away over the last 120m for a comfortable victory. Russell, the 2022 Commonwealth Games champion, clocked 53.92 for second place.

Knight, who missed out on the 2022 World Championships in Oregon after she fell at the Jamaica national championships in June, finished third in 54.33.

Speaking afterwards, Russell said she was disappointed with the time.

“The race was okay but, honestly, I wanted to go faster. I felt that with such fast competitors in the field I could have put together a better race,” she said.

“I shuffled between a few hurdles and did not execute my technique correctly at times. Nevertheless, I am grateful for the result because it’s been a long season and I have run a lot. I love running and it’s part of the job that I do (to also do some 4x400ms for Jamaica), so even though my body is tired I´m happy to be racing. I look forward to coming back to Switzerland for the finals in Zurich.”

Meanwhile, Knight, who had not raced since she ran 53.85 at Marietta, Georgia on July 2, was happy with her run from lane one.

“Very pleased with my race,” she said, “I felt I executed my plans well this evening, especially since I had not competed in the last two months. I hope to continue improving and doing a PB this year. It will be great if I can make it to the Diamond League final.”

 

 

 

By her own very high standards, double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah has not quite achieved the soaring heights of the Tokyo Games this season but insists she is still finding her way around a new system.

On the back of a season where she claimed the sprint double at the Olympics, and went on to register the second fastest time ever recorded for a woman over 100m, Thompson-Herah was in the news again following the announcement to split from longtime coach Stephen Francis.

If the majority of the athlete’s times and performances are anything to judge by that decision, an alliance with husband Derron Herah is yet to bear fruit.

“My expectations coming off last year were high and I was looking forward to this year.  Right now, the way I want my story to be written is not the way I want it to go but whatever God has in store he will put it together at the right time,” Thompson-Herah told members of the media ahead of Friday’s Diamond League meet.

“I’m just staying patient and I’ll keep working.  I always wanted to get my first World title but I’m still working towards that, I want that to be a part of my tally to be a defending World champ.  I was really grateful and excited to achieve my first 100m medal, a bronze…the 200m was not the best but I’ve moved past that,” she added.

“I think I’m having a good season so far.  The fact that I’m adjusting to a new system, new coach, and everything.  I’m still learning.”

After missing out on the World Championship titles Thompson-Herah went on to win the sprint double at the Commonwealth Games.

Reigning 200m World Champion Shericka Jackson has admitted that the crushing disappointment of failing to advance out of the first round of her pet event at last year’s Toyko Olympic Games provided fuel to ignite a stellar 2022.

Jackson, one of the favourites to win the race in the Toyko, failed to advance beyond the first round of the event after miscalculating badly in the heats.  After leading the race comfortably for most of the way, the sprinter eased up before the line and was passed by two other athletes.

One year later, however, there would be no such mistakes as she not only advanced from the preliminary round but went on to clock a blistering 21.45 to take gold in the World Championship final.  The time was the second fastest ever clocked over the distance behind Florence Griffith-Joyner’s 21.34.

In addition, however, Jackson also claimed the silver medal behind celebrated compatriot Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in the 100m.  Her time of 10.71 was a huge personal best and made her the 6th fastest woman of all time.

“I worked really hard this year.  Last year not advancing in the 200m made me mentally strong.  Last year’s loss for me in the 200m took a toll because the 200 is my favorite event and not the 100,” Jackson told members of the media, ahead of Thursday’s Lausanne Diamond League meet.

“For me not to be able to advance made me work extremely hard this year.  I got stronger in the gym and I think that paid off in my running 21.4.”

Jackson will face off against Fraser-Pryce and their compatriot Elaine Thompson-Herah in a fiery Diamond League clash set for Thursday in Lausanne.

Five-time world 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce believes if she can have a race on Friday where everything comes together, getting below 10.6 is possible.

The legal team for the crew and owners of the Harbour Master party boat have been blocked from pursuing private criminal action against Grenadian national athlete Anderson Peters.

This comes after Grenadian Director of Public of Prosecutions Christopher Nelson used his “constitutional powers” to discontinue private action.

Last Friday, attorney Cajeton Hood, who represents the crew and owners of the vessel, signaled his intention to bring private criminal charges against Peters.

Hood told Grenadian journalists on Friday that he was awaiting a signature from Grenada’s Chief Magistrate, Teddy St Louis, to proceed with the lawsuit. He was seeking to prosecute Peters for harm, assault, obscene language, abusive language and insulting language.

When Hood first announced his intention, DPP Nelson said the allegations against Peters had issues of credibility and reliability.

However, the matter could still proceed if it is appealed in the High Court. Contacted for comment yesterday, Hood told Trinidad & Tobago Guardian Media he was awaiting instructions from his clients on whether to file an appeal.

The charges stemmed from a brawl on the Harbour Master on August 10. Following the brawl, four crew members were slapped with two charges of assault against Peters and brother, Kiddon.

In the days after the brawl, the vessel was also “arrested” after Peters’ legal team filed a civil action against its owners. The vessel cannot be brought back to Trinidad until it is released by a Grenadian court.

Jamaica secured 24 medals to lead all Caribbean nations at the 2022 NACAC Open Championships which concluded on Sunday in Freeport, Bahamas.

Entering Sunday’s final day with 12 medals, the Jamaicans doubled their tally to finish second overall on the medal table, trailing the USA who finished with 69.

Those 24 medals were split into six golds, nine silvers and nine bronzes. Cuba was the next best placed Caribbean country with six medals including two golds, one silver and three bronzes.

Jamaica’s final day was highlighted by Andrew Hudson’s personal best 19.87 to win the 200m.

Hosts The Bahamas was next with one gold, two silvers and four bronzes for seven medals overall. That gold medal came from hometown hero Shaunae Miller-Uibo who ran 49.40 to win the 400m.

Also registering gold medals were The British Virgin Islands through Kyron McMaster’s brilliant season’s best 47.34 in the 400m hurdles and Dominica through Thea LaFond's 14.49m in the triple jump.

Trinidad & Tobago got silvers in the men’s 4x100m and men’s javelin through Keshorn Walcott

Bermuda (one silver), St Vincent & The Grenadines (one silver), Barbados (one silver), Antigua & Barbuda (one bronze) and Puerto Rico (one bronze) also registered medals.

Dominica’s Thea LaFond is the 2022 women’s triple jump champion after she jumped 14.49m on her final jump to win the event on the final day of the NACAC Senior Championships in The Bahamas on Sunday.

Andrew Hudson unleashed his frustrations at missing out on the World Championships in July at the 2022 NACAC Championships in the Bahamas on Sunday winning the 200m final in a lifetime best and new meet record of 19.87.

In doing so, the Jamaican 200m champion, won his very first medal for Jamaica in an international competition.

Hudson,  the Texas Tech alum whose transfer of allegiance from the United States did not take effect until July 28, causing him to miss representing Jamaica at the World Championships in Oregon, took command of the race from the gun to clock a massive personal best.

In his wake was the America duo of Kyree King, who ran 20.00 for the silver medal and Josephus Lyles, the brother of world 200m champion, Noah Lyles, who clocked 20.18 for the bronze medal.

The USA took the women’s race as Brittany Brown sped to 22.34 for the gold medal ahead of Tynia Gaither of the Bahamas and A’Keyla Mitchell of the USA who ran 22.53 for the bronze medal.

Kyron McMaster and Shian Salmon took the respective 400m hurdles titles on the final day of the NACAC Championships in The Bahamas on Sunday.

Early challenges faced by the Jamaican contingent when they arrived in the Bahamas week, have not prevented the 39-member team from racking up medals at the 2022 NACAC Open Championships.

Distance runner Adelle Tracey was delighted to celebrate her first medal for Jamaica, a bronze, in the women’s 800m, at the 2022 NACAC Championships in the Bahamas on Saturday.

The athlete, who switched allegiance from Great Britain to Jamaica in June, made her debut at the IAAF World Championships but was unable to take part in the Commonwealth Games earlier this month due to protocols surrounding the international transfer.

The athlete was, however, able to return to the track for the NACAC Games where she finished third in the women’s 800m behind the US pair of Ajee and Allie Wilson.  Ajee finished just ahead of her compatriot Allie in a  photo finish 1:58.47 to 1:58.48.

The Jamaican finished third in 1:59.54 only her second time under 2 minutes, behind her personal best, which came at the IAAF World Championship in Eugene, Oregon in July.  Tracey was delighted with the result and performance.

“Ajee set a really tough pace from the get-go, that was great for me because I actually ran my second fastest time.  It was very hot today, it’s super windy.  I just made it hard but there is a lot of travel in my legs,” Tracey said after the race.

  “I was kind of hoping it would have been a bit more tactical but that was a really honest race and there are some really fast girls in there so I’m really happy with it,” she added.

The distance runner was also delighted to have made the trip.

"It feels like a really special place and this is my first medal as a Jamaican athlete as well, so, I really love the Bahamas.”

The Jamaicans also picked up other medals on the night when Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper claimed silver in the women’s 100m hurdles and another bronze for Orlando Bennett in the men’s 110m hurdles.

Bahamas' Shaunae Miller-Uibo put on a show for her hometown fans with a dominant display to win the women’s 400m on day 2 of the NACAC Athletics Championships, in Grand Bahama, on Saturday.

The Olympic and World Champion left very little to doubt as she left the blocks and quickly covered the field by the top of the straight.

World championship bronze medalist Sada Williams of Barbados looked to battle back against Miller-Uibo down the stretch but the Bahamian had enough to pull a few metres clear by the finish line.

Miller-Uibo, who has lost just once in 8 races over the distance this season, stopped the clock in 49.40, her fourth fastest time of the season.  Williams finished second in 49.86, while Jamaica’s Stephenie-Ann Mcpherson was third in 50.36.

In the men’s equivalent, Jamaica’s Christopher Taylor recorded his fastest time over the distance this season after outbattling his opponents down the stretch to stop the clock at 44.63, only his second time below 45 seconds this season.  Another Jamaican Nathon Allen was second in 45.04 with the United States’ Bryce Deadmon third in 45.06.

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