The LIV Golf Invitational tournament schedule for 2023 has been confirmed.

The breakaway tour, headed up by Greg Norman and backed by Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund (PIF), started last year and caused ripples across the world of golf.

High-profile players such as Sergio Garcia, Patrick Reed, Cameron Smith, Bryson DeChambeau and Dustin Johnson signed up for the lucrative competition, leaving the PGA Tour in the process.

On Monday, the 14 tournaments were confirmed, with the events set to take place across seven different nations.

Five venues that were on last year's slate return for 2023, with the Centurion Golf Club close to London, the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster in New Jersey, Rich Harvest Farms in Illinois, Trump National Doral Golf Club in Miami and Jeddah's Royal Greens Golf and Country Club all making a comeback.

The LIV Golf Invitational Bangkok, LIV Golf International Portland and LIV Golf International Boston are not returning this year, though 

New venues include Orange County National in Orlando and the Trump National Golf Club in Washington D.C. – another course owned by the former United States president Donald Trump.

Seven venues had previously been confirmed prior to Monday's announcement.

The 2023 season will start at El Camaleon Golf Course in Mexico in late February, and end in Jeddah in November.

Eight of the tournaments will take place in the USA, with one each in Mexico, Spain, Singapore, Australia, Saudi Arabia and the United Kingdom.

LIV Golf 2023 schedule

LIV Golf Mayakoba, Playa del Carmen, Mexico (February 24-26)
LIV Golf Tuscon, Arizona, USA (March 17-19)
LIV Golf Orlando, Florida, USA (March 31-Apr 2)
LIV Golf Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia (April 21-23)
LIV Golf Singapore, Singapore (April 28-30)
LIV Golf Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA (May 26-28)
LIV Golf Valderrama, Andalucia, Spain (June 30-July 2)
LIV Golf London, Hertfordshire, UK (July 7-9)
LIV Golf Greenbrier, West Virginia, USA (August 4-6)
LIV Golf Bedminster, New Jersey, USA (August 11-13)
LIV Golf Chicago, Illinois, USA (September 22-24)
LIV Golf Miami, Florida, USA (October 20-22)
LIV Golf Team Championship, King Abdullah Economic City, Saudi Arabia (November 3-5)

Rory McIlroy has been called an "immature little child" by Patrick Reed.

McIlroy confirmed he purposely ignored Reed at a practice session ahead of the Dubai Desert Classic.

Reed, one of the high-profile players who left the PGA Tour to sign up for the LIV Golf Invitational last year, was alleged to have thrown a tee at McIlroy, who claimed not to have noticed.

The American, who McIlroy said had served him with court papers on Christmas Eve, has denied there was any malicious intent behind that move, as he hit out at the world number one's behaviour.

Reed told reporters: "One of my attorneys filed a lawsuit against the PGA Tour based off the fans' perspective.

"Supposedly, he subpoenaed Tiger [Woods] and Rory. You know, the media sits there and acts as if I'm the one that is subpoenaing these guys and, honestly, that's far from the truth – it has nothing to do with me and nothing to do with any of the lawsuits that I'm a part of.

"It was good to see [Rory] again this week, that he's over here supporting [the DP World Tour] again, but it is one of those things.

"If you're going to act like an immature little child, then you might as well be treated like one."

Reed, who won the Masters in 2018, explained what happened when he went to greet McIlroy.

"[McIlroy's caddie] Harry [Diamond] shook my hand and Rory was messing with his TrackMan [golf app], and he just looked up and kind of decided to ignore us.

"Since my tees are Team Aces LIV tees, I flicked him one. It was kind of a funny shot back. Funny how a small, little flick has basically turned into me stabbing him."

McIlroy said the incident was a "storm in a teacup", but also said: "I'm living in reality. I don't know where he’s living. If I were in his shoes, I wouldn't expect a hello or a handshake."

Reed is now hoping to go head-to-head with McIlroy out on the course.

"That would be great, but I will tell you this much – there won't be much talking," Reed said.

"Even if I said hello on the first, he won't say anything. I can be as much a gentleman as I can be, [it's] his choice if he doesn't respond."

Rory McIlroy saw no need to defend his actions after he blanked Patrick Reed at a practice session ahead of the Dubai Desert Classic.

Reed is alleged to have thrown a golf tee at McIlroy after the world number one refused to acknowledge him.

McIlroy has stressed he did not see a tee being thrown at him, while Reed denied it.

However, McIlroy explained he has no desire to speak to Reed, who the Northern Irishman has claimed sent him court papers on Christmas Eve.

Reed is one of several high-profile players to have joined the LIV Golf Invitational Series last year, a Saudi-backed breakaway from the PGA Tour, the main tour for which McIlroy has become an unofficial spokesperson over the past 12 months.

"Patrick came up to say hello and I didn't really want him to," McIlroy told reporters in Dubai.

"From my recollection, that was it. I didn't see a tee. I didn't feel a tee. Obviously, someone else saw that.

"But it's definitely a storm in a teacup. I can't believe it's actually turned into a story; it's nothing.

"I was down by my bag, and he came up to me. I was busy working and sort of doing my practice. I didn't feel the need to acknowledge him."

It is unclear if McIlroy will take any further steps, though the 33-year-old added: "I didn't see a tee coming my direction at all, but apparently that's what happened. And if roles were reversed and I'd have thrown that tee at him, I'd be expecting a lawsuit."

McIlroy also suggested Reed must be living in a different world if he believed the four-time major champion would shake his hand.

"I was subpoenaed by his lawyer on Christmas Eve," McIlroy said.

"Trying to have a nice time with my family and someone shows up on your doorstep and delivers that, you're not going to take that well.

"I'm living in reality, I don't know where he's living. If I were in his shoes, I wouldn't expect a hello or a handshake."

McIlroy again reiterated his opposition to LIV Golf, saying: "There's no point in just being a mouthpiece when you can't back that up by playing good golf and showing people the rewards people can have out here if they are playing well.

"It's a merit-based system. That's the thing that I've always struggled with: if a five-year-old boy or girl know that they work hard and they shoot the scores, there's a merit-based system in golf all the way through junior golf, amateur golf, all the way up to the professional level, and they can make it to the top levels of the game.

"This is the one thing that's come into the game that has disrupted that. It's not a merit-based system."

Patrick Swayze famously said "nobody puts Baby in the corner" in 'Dirty Dancing', but Scottie Scheffler joked he planned to do so for Bubba Watson at this year's Masters Champions dinner.

It was confirmed last month that LIV Golf defectors will be allowed to play at Augusta National provided they meet the eligibility criteria, as the civil war between the Saudi-backed breakaway series and the PGA Tour continues.

Two-time champion Watson is among a group of past victors such as Phil Mickelson, Sergio Garcia, Patrick Reed, and Charl Schwartzel, while Cameron Smith, Brooks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau can all tee it up due to successes at other major tournaments.

Jon Rahm shrewdly observed this week that "the Masters Champions Dinner's going to be a little tense compared to how it’s been in the past" as players from the warring tours gather in the same room.

Scheffler, aiming to regain world number one status in Hawaii at the Tour of Champions this week, did his part to diffuse any simmering tension with a cheeky comment about Watson during a chance meeting on vacation.

"Yeah, I haven't seen many of the LIV guys. I saw Bubba on vacation this year, and I told him that I was just going to have a separate table for him in the corner by himself. Only kidding, obviously!" the defending Masters champion quipped.

"I just walked into this restaurant and him and Angie [Watson's wife] were sitting there and I was like, 'Hey, man, what's up.'"

Scheffler did reflect on the strange events occurring in golf.

His locker at Hualalai Golf Club this week is next to defending champion Smith, who is ineligible to play following his defection to LIV. 

Scheffler, though, remains confident the wounds will heal.

"In the world of golf, it's definitely a little sad what's happening. It's kind of weird this week. I get to my locker, and my locker's next to Cam Smith's locker, because he's a past champ here, and he's not here," he added.

"So, it's a little strange, but golf will move on. I think this stuff just takes time. Things will heal and we'll see what happens. 

"All that stuff is not really for me. I can only show up and just try and play good golf, and I'm not going to LIV anytime soon and so it's not of a concern for me at the moment."

Asked about the mood in the room at the Champions Dinner, Scheffler said: "With Augusta National being such a special place and with the history of the game and whatnot I think we can put all our stuff aside and just get together for a fun meal, all in a room together and just kind of celebrate the game of golf and Augusta National and just hang out."

Jon Rahm wants the PGA and DP World tours to collaborate in making a decision on the inclusion of LIV Golf players at this year's Ryder Cup.

A number of high-profile players have left both tours for LIV Golf since the Saudi Arabia-backed circuit's inception last year.

Henrik Stenson was stripped of the Europe captaincy in July after making the switch, with Ryder Cup veterans like Sergio Garcia, Ian Poulter and Lee Westwood among those in danger of being ruled ineligible, while the United States have ruled out the selection of LIV players.

Speaking ahead of the Sentry Tournament of Champions, Rahm said it would not be smart to have a situation at the Ryder Cup – which takes place in Rome in September – where one team calls up LIV Golf players and the other does not.

"Listen, there's some people that are going to have to make some tough choices," he said. "I hope the PGA of America and European Tour make a decision together. I don't think it would be smart to have one team allowing LIV players and one not to.

"And besides that, even if they decide not to on that side, I think it's going to give an opportunity for a lot of great young players to show up and have the chance in Europe, right? It's just going to be an opportunity for all of them. We saw a younger United States team last Ryder Cup and they did what they did [beating Europe 19-9 in 2021].

"I'm hoping these younger guys who have grown up watching the Ryder Cup and seeing their idols do what they do, let's say, it energises the team a little bit in any manner and we show up there to win."

Rahm also joked about the "chaos" around the LIV Golf breakaway, saying: "I've had two kids in 15 months, so compared to that, I don't know if what's happened around golf is as comparable."

He insists it has not changed his perception of his fellow professionals, though, adding: "I didn't feel a difference in any of the majors last year. If somebody has a problem with LIV players, they're just not going to deal with them and that's about it.

"In my mind, like I've said it before, I respect their choice and the ones I was friends with before I'm still going to be friends with, right? It doesn't change the way I'm going to operate with them."

Rahm, a big football fan, was also asked for his opinion on the recent World Cup final that saw Argentina and Lionel Messi beat France on penalties after an exciting 3-3 draw in Qatar, which also featured Kylian Mbappe scoring a hat-trick for Les Bleus.

"That final was incredible," he said. "I think I took more inspiration from Mbappe. He put the team on his back and tied a final that they had no business tying, let's be honest.

"And Messi, I mean, I've been watching Messi play for so long that it's amazing that he can still surprise a lot of people. When the debate of greatest of all time is up in the air, he does what he did and carried Argentina to a World Cup final.

"It's not my business to decide who is the best or who is not because I never saw [Diego] Maradona play, but he's made a pretty good argument.

"I don't know if I'll see a final this good ever again in my lifetime. I hope I do, but I doubt it. The only way this could have been better if it was Messi and [Cristiano] Ronaldo facing off and they each had a hat trick and things like that. Kylian being the next closest thing, because he's clearly the future of this sport."

Matt Fitzpatrick would welcome the inclusion of Sergio Garcia in Europe's Ryder Cup team despite the Spaniard switching to the LIV Golf tour.

Europe's preparations for the 2023 tournament in Rome have been badly affected by the sport's ongoing civil war since the inception of the controversial LIV Golf in 2021.

Henrik Stenson was stripped of the Europe captaincy in July after joining the Saudi-funded circuit, while it remains to be seen whether his replacement Luke Donald selects players who made the switch.

As such, Ryder Cup veterans like Garcia, Ian Poulter and Lee Westwood are among those in danger of being ruled ineligible, with the United States ruling out the selection of LIV Golf players.

But U.S. Open champion Fitzpatrick sees no problem in selecting the likes of Garcia – who is Europe's all-time leading points scorer at the Ryder Cup with 28.5 – so long as they do not enter PGA Tour or DP World Tour events.

"It might be some players from other places in the world," Fitzpatrick told Sky Sports News. "I think there definitely are a few personal relationships that have been dented by this. I'm not bothered, I just want to win, and I'm sure those boys do too.

"Sergio would be the one that would stand out for me, particularly. I'm happy to share a room with him, if that's going to be the case. I can corner him off for everyone else.

"It was a tough one because [Stenson] had started gearing up for Rome, making notes and putting plans together. And then it's like, 'sorry, lads, I'm off.'

"As long as you go and don't come back, I don't have an issue. Go take the money, go play wherever you want, I could not care less, just don't come back and then take spots from other guys that want to play.

"I understand that there are the likes of Westy [Westwood], Poulter and Sergio that have played a lot in Europe over the years and have done their bit, and they have. I can't ever knock them for that, they've done way more than I have for the European Tour."

LIV Golf players will be able to play in the 2023 Masters provided they meet the tournament's existing entry criteria.

Phil Mickelson, Sergio Garcia, Bubba Watson, Patrick Reed and Charl Schwartzel joined the controversial Saudi Arabia-backed breakaway LIV Golf series this year, but will be eligible to compete at Augusta next April due to being former Masters champions.

Cameron Smith has been invited to play due to his Open triumph this year, while Bryson DeChambeau and Brooks Koepka can also tee off in Georgia as a result of their major successes.

Augusta National Golf Club Fred Ridley said in a statement: "From its inception in 1934, the purpose of the Masters Tournament has been to benefit the game of golf.

"Each April, the Masters assembles the world’s leading golfers to compete for the Green Jacket and a place in history.

"Regrettably, recent actions have divided men’s professional golf by diminishing the virtues of the game and the meaningful legacies of those who built it.

"Although we are disappointed in these developments, our focus is to honour the tradition of bringing together a pre-eminent field of golfers this coming April.

"Therefore, as invitations are sent this week, we will invite those eligible under our current criteria to compete in the 2023 Masters Tournament.

"We have reached a seminal point in the history of our sport. At Augusta National, we have faith that golf, which has overcome many challenges through the years, will endure again."

Mickelson did not play in the Masters this year as he took time out from the sport after coming in for huge criticism over comments he made about Saudi Arabia's human rights record before joining LIV Golf.

Rory McIlroy feels like he is on a “journey” to winning another major title and is optimistic his drought could end next season.

The Northern Irishman has enjoyed a successful 2022, winning the FedEx Cup for the third time and ending the season at the top of the world rankings.

McIlroy endured the agony of missing out on being crowned Open champion after putting himself in a great position to win it, while he was runner-up in The Masters and finished eighth in the PGA Championship.

It is eight years since the 33-year-old won the last of his four major tiles, but he is confident he will not have much longer to wait for the fifth.

"I'm really excited for the majors next year," he told RTE. "I haven't felt this good going into a season, especially a major season, in a long, long time.

"It didn’t happen [in The Open at St Andrews] and it was really hard to see the picture clearly at that time. But a week or two after that, you reflect on it and think 'I'm way closer to winning a major now than I have been in a long time'.

"It's a journey again. I feel like I'm on this journey to win my first major again, which is a really great feeling. I'm getting closer, I'm laying the foundations, and I'm sort of building it step by step."

McIlroy also reiterated that he feels LIV Golf boss Greg Norman should step down for the good of the sport.

"He's become too divisive of a figure," he added. "There's no hope of dialogue going forward if he's involved.

"We have a plethora of amazing golfers on the PGA Tour and the DP World Tour, but I think the game is healthier as a whole if we're all playing together.

"Greg's done his bit, he's been disruptive, he's been divisive. But now I think it's time for someone to come in and cooler heads to talk about this.

"If that happens, the game of golf will hopefully end up in a better place than it is right now."

Greg Norman has vowed to remain with LIV Golf despite Rory McIlroy's criticism, adding the door remains open for the world number one to defect down the line.

In addition, the double major champion revealed the Saudi-funded breakaway tour has held discussions with Justin Thomas, though he did not say whether the two-time PGA Championship winner would switch his allegiance.

Since its inception in 2021, LIV Golf has sparked a bitter civil war in the sport, with McIlroy and Tiger Woods launching stinging rebukes against Norman and his allies.

There were calls earlier this month for the Australian to quit, with the pair suggesting reconciliation could be on the table if he was to stand down.

But Norman says he will resist such calls, telling Bunkered magazine: "Rory and Tiger have no idea what they're talking about. None whatsoever.

"I have got the full support from my chairman. There has never been one thing to suggest otherwise. They're trying to bait me into a public back-and-forth. I'm not going down that childish path.

"You're already seeing LIV is a leader. The PGA Tour and DP World Tour, they're followers. They've basically copied our homework."

Norman did suggest that McIlroy would be welcomed with open arms if he was to change his tune though, while praising Thomas for his conduct in not criticising LIV Golf after he was approached to join.

"Our door is open for everybody," he added. "We're not the PGA Tour. We're not like that. We exist for the players, so we will always have an open door, whether that's for Rory or Jordan Spieth or Justin Thomas or whoever. 

"We talked to JT [Thomas], we sat down with him and gave him the full presentation. If you notice, he's not said much negative about what we're doing, presumably because he knows it and understands it."

LIV Golf has added three new events to the circuit's 2023 schedule, which will take place in Arizona, Oklahoma and West Virginia.

Last month, the controversial Saudi Arabia-backed tour announced stops in Mexico, Spain, Singapore and Australia would be included on the calendar next year.

Wednesday's addition of three competitions to take place in the United States means LIV Golf has now revealed half of its 14 planned events for 2023.

A statement from the circuit said: "LIV Golf today announced three new championship venues that will host tournaments as part of the 2023 LIV Golf League schedule. 

"The Gallery Golf Club in Tucson, Arizona (March 17-19), Cedar Ridge Country Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma (May 12-14), and The Greenbrier in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia (August 4-6) will welcome many of the sport's biggest stars in the groundbreaking LIV Golf League teeing off in 2023."

LIV Golf chief executive and commissioner Greg Norman added: "LIV Golf's expansion to new US markets adds to the growing excitement for the league launch in 2023. 

"More fans across the country and around the globe will experience the LIV Golf energy and innovative competition that has reinvigorated the sport.

"These championship courses will contribute to the transformative season ahead for players, fans and the game of golf."

LIV added that final rosters for the rebranded LIV Golf League will be announced in 2023, with 12 team franchises set to compete across 14 events for a total of $405million in prize purses.

Former world number one Jason Day will not be making an imminent defection to LIV Golf, but has not ruled out departing the PGA Tour in the future if his view changes.

The Australian, who won the 2015 PGA Championship for his only career major to date, is close friends with countryman Cameron Smith, who made the switch after winning The Open Championship earlier this year.

With several of the sport's leading stars having defected to the Saudi Arabia-backed breakaway, a bitter civil war has been sparked between the two tours.

While stating he would not follow Smith to the Greg Norman-headed competition immediately, Day refused to completely chalk off a switch down the line, while adding he remains saddened by the split.

"I definitely would say no, I wouldn't go as of now," he told the Palm Beach Post.

"[But] who knows in a year's time, you might think differently.

"I don't blame some of the guys for going because there's quite a lot of money these guys are earning. I understand it.

"For me, it just depends on how you feel about major championships. I know that's all up in the air right now if they're going to play or not, and they don't have world ranking points out there.

"It's disappointing there's a divide on both sides. All those guys out there are my friends.

"Some of the friendships fractured between some of the guys who have been more outspoken [but] I don't mind the guys leaving."

Day suggested a potential way to harmony would be to stage the PGA Tour from January through August, and then have the LIV competition follow to complete the year.

"I honestly wish the tours could join somehow," he added. "That would be great. I think that could potentially work if you want to do it. That would be fun."

Rory McIlroy decided to become "a pain in the a**e" for Greg Norman after the LIV Golf chief executive accused him of having been "brainwashed" by the PGA Tour.

The Northern Irishman has been a fierce critic of the controversial Saudi Arabia-backed circuit, and was recently joined by Tiger Woods in calling for Norman to leave his role.

McIlroy said last month that Norman must "exit stage left" and that the bitter civil war engulfing the sport would not end "unless there's an adult in the room".

Norman recently opted to continue the duo's war of words when speaking to Today's Golfer, saying he paid "zero attention" to the three-time FedEx Cup champion's opinion.

Speaking to the Irish Independent, McIlroy recalled a positive exchange he had with Norman after watching a documentary focused on the Australian's collapse at the 1986 Masters, where Jack Nicklaus edged him out for a one-shot victory.

"It was a bit of an olive branch," McIlroy said. "He came back to me straight away, [saying] 'I really think golf can be a force for good around the world... I know our opinions are not aligned but I'm just trying to create more opportunities for every golfer around the world.'

"Fine. Really nice. Then, a couple of weeks later, he does an interview with The Washington Post and says I've been brainwashed by the PGA Tour.

"We've had this really nice back-and-forth and he says that about me.

"I thought: 'You know what? I'm going to make it my business now to be as much of a pain in his a**e as possible'."

Greg Norman says he pays "zero attention" to Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy after they called for him to be ousted as LIV Golf CEO and commissioner.

Woods this week echoed McIlroy's sentiments that Norman "has to go" in order for the PGA Tour and breakaway series LIV Golf to hold constructive talks, with the two organisations having filed lawsuits against each other.

The legendary American stated: "There is an opportunity out there if both organisations put a stay on their litigation. That's the problem.

"There is no willingness to negotiate if you have litigation against you. I think Greg has to go first of all. It has to start with leadership on their side, understanding that what is happening right now is not the best future for the whole game of golf.

"You need to have the two bodies come together and if one side has so much animosity, trying to destroy our tour, then how do you work with that?"

World number one McIlroy said last month: "I think he [Norman] just needs to exit stage left. He's made his mark but I think now is the right time to sort of say, look, you've got this thing off the ground but no one is going to talk unless there's an adult in the room that can actually try to mend fences."

Yet Australian Norman is adamant he will be going nowhere.

"I pay zero attention to McIlroy and Woods, right?" he told Today's Golfer. "They have their agenda for whatever reason. They're saying whatever they want to say.

"It has no bearing or effect on me. I'm going to be with LIV for a long, long period of time."

Norman says he can heal the rifts and is doing a good job.

He said: "Of course it can happen under my leadership. I mean, Tiger might be a messenger, right? Who knows. All I know is we are going to keep doing what we're doing with LIV, and we are just going to keep moving forward."

Norman added: "No matter where I go in the world, nobody - not one person - has said what I'm doing is stupid or wrong."

Tiger Woods has become the latest major figure on the PGA Tour to say LIV Golf's Greg Norman must leave to allow peace to break out as the sport's civil war persists.

The 15-time major winner has backed up world number one Rory McIlroy's comments for the Australian to stand down in order to help heal the divide.

Norman, the CEO and face of the Saudi-funded breakaway tour, has been a prominent figure amid a bitter split in golf, with several of the world's leading players defecting to the rival series and with lawsuits between both parties.

McIlroy already said the chance of a compromise between both tours was unlikely as long as Norman remained in place, and now Woods has echoed his words.

"I see that there's an opportunity out there if both organisations put a stay on their litigation, but that's the problem, they've got to put a stay on it," Woods stated ahead of the Hero World Challenge.

"Whether or not they do that or not, there's no willingness to negotiate if you have a litigation against you.

"So if they both have a stay and then have a break, and then they can meet and figure something out, then maybe there is something to be had.

"But I think Greg has to go, first of all, and then obviously litigation against us and then our counter-suit against them, those would then have to be at a stay as well. Then we can talk, we can all talk freely."

Woods was set to play in the Hero World Challenge this week, but he withdrew after developing a foot problem.

He is still set to partner McIlroy at The Match later this month and then play with son Charlie at the PNC Championship.

Cameron Smith thought a third Australian PGA Championship would be beyond him after posting a final round of 68 to seal victory at the Royal Queensland Golf Club.

The home favourite, a two-time winner before in 2017 and 2018, finished 14 under par, with a three-shot lead over fellow Australian Jason Scrivener and Japan's Ryo Hisatsune.

Amid a closing day interrupted by lightning strikes across the course, Smith recovered from a slow start to post three birdies over the final seven holes and claim the trophy.

Though seldom off the pace across the weekend, the defending Open Championship winner says he was not sure if he would be in the conversation for victory before he teed off.

"I really didn't think I had it in me at the start of the week," he stated. "I was a bit scratchy [but] the game has got better and better as the week went on, other than the front nine today."

On the weather, he added: "You are in the mojo a little and for it to be stopped not once but twice was a little frustrating. But I just held on and played really solid those last eight holes."

Hisatsune was best in show on the final day with an impressive 65, a feat matched only by Australian Geoff Ogilvy and Englishman John Parry.

The latter's performance was enough to seal a joint-fourth-place finish overall, tied with Min Woo Lee on nine under par.

 

Page 1 of 11
© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.