Dillian Whyte labelled Anthony Joshua the number one "bull***t guy" in response to comments his rival made about his upcoming WBC heavyweight title fight against Tyson Fury.

Fury puts his belt on the line against Whyte at Wembley Stadium on April 23, while Joshua is slated for a rematch against Oleksandr Usyk, who holds the WBA Super, WBO and IBF straps.

Speaking to IFL TV, Joshua said he was rooting for long-time rival Whyte when he dons the gloves against Fury in a huge domestic showdown.

"It's a good opponent [for Fury], it's a good [title] defence against Dillian Whyte," Joshua said.

"Dillian Whyte needs to come in, look at what Tyson Fury does and reacts to, and do the complete opposite. Maybe work the body, and be conditioned to go the distance.

"I'm rooting for Dillian, even though I hate him, and I want to smash him one of these days. Go on Dillian, I'm with you all the way."

Replying on his Instagram story, Whyte seemed to be affronted by Joshua's declaration of hatred.

"Why so bitter. Number 1 bulls*** guy. @anthonyjoshua what did I ever do to you man," Whyte posted, before adding good luck to Joshua in the bout against Usyk.

In a seeming bid to defuse any simmering tensions, Joshua replied on his own Instagram story: "Hate is a strong word I respect you champ. I Just want to fight you at some point."

Joshua defeated Whyte with a seventh-round knockout when the two met back in December 2015.

Anthony Joshua revealed he will be rooting for Dillian Whyte against Tyson Fury despite expressing his hatred for him.

The all-British showdown between WBC champion Fury and mandatory challenger Whyte was finally confirmed for Wembley Stadium on April 23 after weeks of negotiations.

Joshua was expected to fight for the unified heavyweight titles against Oleksandr Usyk shortly after, but there are doubts over the bout with the Ukrainian reportedly returning home following the invasion by Russia.

The winner of the clash between Joshua and Usyk, whenever that is scheduled for, will likely be the next opponent for the victor of Fury's second world title defence.

But Joshua has made it clear who he wants to see come out on top as Whyte looks to an end Fury's unbeaten record.

"It's a good opponent [for Fury], it's a good [title] defence against Dillian Whyte," Joshua told iFL TV.

"Dillian Whyte needs to come in, look at what Tyson Fury does and reacts to, and do the complete opposite. Maybe work the body, and be conditioned to go the distance. 

"But I hope Dillian trains hard [and] doesn't underestimate Tyson. Because it's his first shot for Dillian, I think he'll be hungry, do you know what I mean?

"This ain't like his tenth time fighting for a title, you can have a little hiccup along the way. This is his first time fighting for the title.

"I'm rooting for Dillian, even though I hate him, and I want to smash him one of these days. Go on Dillian, I'm with you all the way."

Joshua, who defeated Whyte in December 2015, was due to face Fury last year before a court ruling ordered the final bout of a trilogy battle with Deontay Wilder.

Meanwhile, Joshua continues his preparations for a rematch with Usyk, despite the uncertainties surrounding the showdown due to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

When asked whether he was concerned for Usyk, Joshua responded: "I've learnt sport and politics go hand in hand, and they're powerful voices, and it's good that they're speaking up.

"They're not pushing for war, they're saying 'let's find peace.' So good luck to them, and that's it really, before I go on and say something wrong."

Tyson Fury is running out of patience as the heavyweight champion waits to find out who his next opponent will be.

Fury's camp want Anthony Joshua to step aside from his planned rematch with Oleksandr Usyk after the latter's triumph in September.

That would allow Fury to go up against the Ukrainian in a heavyweight unification bout.

The Telegraph reported on Sunday that Joshua had agreed to forego the rematch and receive a £15million payout in return.

However, Joshua denied the claims a deal had been struck. Should nothing be agreed by Wednesday, then purse bids with Dillian Whyte – the WBC mandatory challenger – will go ahead, with that lined up as Fury's next fight instead.

In a video posted to his official social media channels on Tuesday, Fury, who defeated Deontay Wilder last year in the final fight of their trilogy contest, made it clear that he had had enough of waiting.

"Another gym session done, Tuesday morning smashed," the 33-year-old said.

"Tick tick tick effing tick tock is the subject of today. Is Dillian Whyte going to fight me? Is Anthony Joshua going to step aside?

"Let me know. Because I am sick of looking at these bums, sick of listening to their excuses.

"Tick tick tock. The time has run out of the bottle. You're all getting a good hiding – cowards."

Usyk, who is two years older than Fury, has won all 19 of his professional fights, including 13 knockouts.

Fury's record stands at 33 victories and one draw – the contentious first fight against Wilder in 2018.

Anthony Joshua has "a number of proposals" to consider amid reports he could step aside from a rematch with Oleksandr Usyk in order for Tyson Fury to fight the Ukrainian.

Usyk outclassed Joshua at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium last September to claim his WBA (Super), IBF, WBO and IBO heavyweight titles.

The Brit activated a clause to step into the ring with Usyk for a second time, but The Daily Telegraph revealed he could step aside for a fee of £15million to pave the way for his compatriot Fury to do battle with the 35-year-old in a unification bout in the Middle East.

Eddie Hearn, Joshua's promoter, revealed the 2012 Olympic champion has several options to mull over.

"I'm meeting with AJ and 258 management [on Tuesday] to go through plans for his next fight." he told Sky Sports.

"We have a number of proposals and options to discuss. The goal remains the same of course - to re-capture the world heavyweight crown."

Fury has not agreed a mandatory defence of his WBC strap with Dillian Whyte.

Usyk's promoter, Alexander Krassyuk, says it is up in the air over which Englishman will be his fighter's next opponent.

"We are in talks regarding the Fury fight since November," Krassyuk told Sky Sports.

"And though AJ gave his consent [reportedly] we still have not reached the final point in negotiations. And unless we get it - AJ rematch remains the basic option for us."

Eddie Hearn expects Anthony Joshua to announce who his new trainer will be either at the end of this month or early in February.

Joshua decided to shake things up after losing his WBA (Super), IBF, WBO and IBO heavyweight titles to Oleksandr Usyk at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium last September.

Eddy Reynoso, Virgil Hunter and Anthony Wilson are among the trainers Joshua could recruit, while Floyd Mayweather has been giving the Briton advice ahead of an eagerly anticipated rematch with Usyk that has not yet been confirmed.

Hearn, Joshua's promoter, told iFL TV: "I think AJ will make an announcement when camp starts, which I guess will be end of January, early February.

"He's worked hard to get it right. A lot of people have said, 'do you think it's risky to bring in a new trainer?'

"I flip that and say, 'do you think it's risky to not be comfortable with your set-up or your surroundings?'"

Hearn says having a new face in Joshua's corner will not mean there is no role to play for his long-time trainer Robert McCracken.

"He'll always be involved in some way," Hearn said of McCracken.

"He's more than just a trainer to Anthony Joshua... he's a mentor, an advisor.

"Those two will always talk – in what capacity, I don't know. I'll leave that to AJ to announce. But there will certainly be additions to the training team."

Joshua was outclassed by Usyk, suffering the second defeat of his professional career after he was also surprisingly dethroned by Andy Ruiz Jr in 2019.

Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury have signed a two-fight deal to face each other for the undisputed heavyweight championship, promoter Eddie Hearn has announced.

British rivals Joshua and Fury have been in negotiations for several months to agree showdowns for the four major belts in boxing's glamour division.

Joshua (24-1, 22 KOs) holds the WBA, WBO and IBF belts, having successfully defended his title with a ninth-round stoppage of Kubrat Pulev at Wembley Arena in December.

Fury (30-0-1, 21 KOs) sensationally dethroned Deontay Wilder to claim the WBC crown in February last year but has not boxed since.

A date and venue for the initial encounter are yet to be confirmed, although Hearn – who promotes Joshua under his Matchroom Sport banner – told ESPN on Monday that both parties put pen to paper over the weekend.

"We'd like to get a site deal confirmed in the next month," Hearn said.

"The hard part is always getting everybody to put pen to paper. But this was a major effort from all parties to get this over the line.

"You had rival promoters, rival networks and rival fighters."

The hurdles to overcome in getting to this point were not inconsiderable, with Fury working under a co-promotional deal with Frank Warren and Bob Arum's Top Rank, both of whom have rival broadcasting agreements to Hearn's contracts with Sky Sports in the UK and DAZN globally.

Fury's most recent bouts have been aired by BT Sport in his homeland and via ESPN in the United States.

The expectation of ongoing coronavirus restrictions makes the prospect of at least the first fight taking place on British soil feel far-fetched, with a return of heavyweight title boxing to the Middle East – where Joshua avenged his only career defeat against Andy Ruiz Jr with a December 2019 points win in Saudi Arabia – appearing most likely.

"I actually feel we've done the hard part," Hearn said. "Speaking for myself, Anthony and his team at 258 management, I know how hard we've worked hard these last couple of months and I just feel that this fight is so big it's not a difficult sell.

"We've already had approaches from eight or nine sites. The offers have come from multiple countries in the Middle East, from Asia, eastern Europe and America.

"This is the biggest fight in boxing and one of the biggest sporting events in the world. It will be a major, major win for a country that wants to showcase itself."

Some typically idiosyncratic interviews from Fury over recent days, where he stated he had no interest in boxing in the UK again, while claiming to have stopped training in favour of "concentrating on getting me 10 pints of Stella", appeared to cast some doubt upon the Joshua fights getting over the line – especially considering the 32-year-old's previously well-documented struggles with alcohol and depression.

"You never really know with Tyson," Hearn said. "It could be mind games. He could be having a bad day. He could be a little p***** off. Or he could be having a joke.

"One of the fascinations about this fight will be the build-up because they're two totally different characters, two totally different personalities. The mind games will be on another level for this fight. Tyson is very good at that.

"Anthony is excited by that. He's so pumped, so focused, he hasn't stopped training since the Pulev fight. He's like a caged lion. The build-up is going to be epic."

Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury have signed a two-fight deal to face each other for the undisputed heavyweight championship, promoter Eddie Hearn has announced.

British rivals Joshua and Fury have been in negotiations for several months to agree showdowns for the four major belts in boxing's glamour division.

Joshua (24-1, 22 KOs) holds the WBA, WBO and IBF belts, having successfully defended his title with a ninth-round stoppage of Kubrat Pulev at Wembley Arena in December.

Fury (30-0-1, 21 KOs) sensationally dethroned Deontay Wilder to claim the WBC crown in February last year but has not boxed since.

A date and venue for the initial encounter are yet to be confirmed, although Hearn – who promotes Joshua under his Matchroom Sport banner – told ESPN on Monday that both parties put pen to paper over the weekend.

"We'd like to get a site deal confirmed in the next month," Hearn said.

"The hard part is always getting everybody to put pen to paper. But this was a major effort from all parties to get this over the line.

"You had rival promoters, rival networks and rival fighters."

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