Sarina Wiegman is set for talks over a new contract as England manager after sensationally leading the Lionesses to Women's Euro 2022 glory.

Former Netherlands coach Wiegman took charge of England just 11 months ago but inspired groundbreaking success at her first major tournament in the job.

England's women's side had never previously won a major title, while the last success for either of their senior teams saw the men win the 1966 World Cup.

Incredibly, Wiegman defended the European title she won with the Oranje, becoming the first coach to achieve this success with two different nations.

After a 2-1 final triumph against Germany in Sunday's Wembley final, she has won all 12 of her Women's Euros finals matches across the two roles.

Wiegman is under contract for another three years, in which time England will travel to Australia and New Zealand for the 2023 Women's World Cup before defending their title at the Women's Euro 2025.

But the Football Association (FA) is eager to further tie Wiegman down while she remains unbeaten in her 20 matches as manager. The Lionesses have won 18 of those, scoring 106 goals.

"She is incredible," said FA chief executive Mark Bullingham. "She was our number one target when we were going out to look for a manager, and she was just brilliant all through that process.

"We were delighted to secure her, even though, in our wildest dreams, we thought that this tournament might be too early.

"So, we weren't sure we'd win this one, we were hoping we would win one in the future, so she achieved brilliant results earlier than we could have ever hoped."

He added: "She only signed in September, but we would love her to be with us for a long time. I think she's a really special person and a really special talent."

Sue Campbell, the FA's director of women's football, said of Wiegman: "She'll have a couple of weeks off and then when she gets back we'll have a conversation. She's done an incredible job."

Campbell, quoted by ESPN, added: "When we interviewed her, we knew we were getting the best tactical and technical coach in the world; what we didn't know was that we were getting this exceptional human being.

"The first words she said to me when I walked to her on the pitch [on Sunday] was, 'What have we done?'. She really didn't know. There's a humility there and a passion for the game."

The Football Association (FA), alongside the Premier League and the English Football League (EFL), has announced new measures to help battle against anti-social behaviour in football stadiums after a number of incidents last season.

The closing weeks of the 2021-22 campaign saw some pitch invasions turn ugly, with Sheffield United striker Billy Sharp attacked after fans ran onto the pitch at the end of the Blades' Championship play-off second leg defeat to Nottingham Forest.

Another occurrence of disorder due to fans entering the field was after Port Vale's League Two play-off win over Swindon Town, with numerous Robins players claiming to have been attacked by Vale supporters.

And The FA is clamping down ahead of the new season, with fans now reported immediately to the police and automatically banned by the club for offences such as entering the pitch and the possession or use of flares or smoke bombs.

Parents or guardians of children carrying out offences will also potentially face sanctions.

Other measures announced included an increase in the number of sniffer dogs at stadiums, as well as more thorough searches of fans, while they called upon social media platforms to remove videos showing unlawful fan behaviour.

"The rise in anti-social behaviour that we saw in stadiums at the end of last season was entirely unacceptable," said Mark Bullingham, Chief Executive of The FA.

"Together, English football has introduced new measures and stronger sanctions for the start of the coming season to send out a clear message that we will not tolerate this type of illegal and dangerous behaviour.

"It is the responsibility of everyone in the game, including governing bodies, clubs, players, coaches, and fans, to ensure that we all play our part in protecting our game and each other." 

Everton have been charged by the Football Association (FA) for pitch invasions during their Premier League victory over Crystal Palace in May.

Frank Lampard's side recovered from two goals down to win 3-2 at Goodison Park and secure their top-flight status.

Home supporters encroached the pitch after Dominic Calvert-Lewin had completed the comeback and again when their survival was confirmed following the full-time whistle.

Palace boss Patrick Vieira was involved in an altercation with an Everton supporter during the second pitch invasion, but the FA and Merseyside Police took no further action.

The FA announced on Monday that Everton have been charged with two breaches of rule E20, which relates to fan behaviour and safety.

The statement added: "It is alleged that in the 84th minute and then following completion of the fixture, Everton FC failed to ensure that its spectators, and all persons purporting to be its supporters or followers, conducted themselves in an orderly fashion and refrained from using threatening and/or violent behaviour while encroaching onto the pitch area."

Everton have until July 18 to provide a response.

Tottenham forward Richarlison has been banned for one game and fined by the Football Association (FA) for improper conduct, having thrown a smoke bomb during Everton's Premier League win against Chelsea in May.

The Brazil international recently joined Spurs from the Toffees in a deal reported to be worth an initial £50million, signing a five-year contract.

But he will miss out on his side's first game of the 2022-23 season after accepting a one-match suspension over his actions with his former club, having thrown a smoke bomb towards the stands after scoring at Goodison Park.

"An independent Regulatory Commission has suspended Richarlison de Andrade for one match and fined him £25,000 following a breach of FA Rule E3 that took place during a Premier League game on Sunday 1 May 2022," read an FA statement.

"The Tottenham Hotspur FC forward admitted that his conduct while playing for Everton FC during the 46th minute of this game against Chelsea FC was improper, and his sanction was imposed during a subsequent hearing."

The ban means Richarlison's competitive debut for Spurs will be delayed past their Premier League opener against Southampton on August 6, leaving him in line for an early reunion with Chelsea on August 13 instead.

The Selecao star will likely get his first taste of action during Tottenham's pre-season schedule, however, with Antonio Conte's side set to face a host of international opponents including Sevilla, Rangers and Roma.

Gareth Southgate has the full support of the Football Association after chair Debbie Hewitt provided an impassioned defence of the "high IQ" and emotionally intelligent England manager.

England have made it to the World Cup semi-finals and Euro 2020 showpiece under Southgate, the latter of which the Three Lions' first final appearance at a major tournament in 55 years.

But pressure has mounted after a dismal start to their Nations League campaign in June, losing to Hungary twice either side of draws with Germany and Italy to leave England in danger of relegation.

The most recent 4-0 thrashing to Hungary was the first time England have lost a home match by four or more goals since March 1928, when they lost 5-1 to Scotland.

Hungary also became the first team to score four goals in an away match against England since the Hungarians themselves won 6-3 at Wembley in November 1953.

Frustrated supporters could be heard chanting "you don't know what you're doing" at Molineux towards Southgate, who later vowed to not out-stay his welcome in charge.

With the World Cup in Qatar just five months away, Hewitt was quick to outline her support for the 51-year-old despite ongoing questions over his tactics.

"My personal opinion on Gareth is that he is, by the facts on the pitch, the most successful England manager we've had for 55 years," Hewitt told reporters at a news conference.

"The bit people don't see as much is the Gareth at camp and the culture he's created.

"Certainly prior to Gareth being the manager of England, there was not the pride of wearing the England shirt. There were the club rivalries we'd read about. The players not getting on.

"He's changed that beyond recognition and I've seen that first hand.

"I'd also say that I don't just work in football, I work in business and I've worked with a lot of chief executives and Gareth's skills — his high IQ and high EQ — would make him a chief exec in any sphere.

"That resilience and accountability [are] the two qualities I admire most. There are no slopy shoulders, he doesn't huff, he's resilient and that's what you want in an England manager."

While offering her support publicly, Hewitt says the reaction of Southgate to private conversations expressing the FA's backing also highlighted his credible demeanour.

"Gareth's reaction, as in everything with that sort of conversation, was that it is his accountability, there's always something to learn," she continued.

"That's why it's refreshing working with somebody like that because that openness to learn is quite remarkable and quite unusual in any sphere."

Southgate took charge, initially as caretaker manager, in 2016 and impressed after Sam Allardyce's one-game tenure, with the former Middlesbrough manager earning the permanent job.

After England qualified for the World Cup in Qatar with victory over San Marino in November 2021, Southgate was handed a three-year extension, keeping him as Three Lions' manager until December 2024.

The World Cup will start just one year after he signed the long-term extension and debate has been sparked over whether conducting negotiations was sensible before the results and performances in that tournament are known, but Hewitt assures the correct decision was made.

"I don't think we would be discussing [the contract] had we not had the recent series of games. Clearly, we did that [agreed the new deal] with proper discussion and thought," she added.

"The fact that there's been a stumble does not make us automatically say 'should we have given him a contract?' It is a red herring.

"We have confidence in Gareth for all the reasons I described and I think that's the important thing. And it's particularly important going into the biggest tournament."

Everton forward Richarlison has been charged with improper conduct by the Football Association (FA) after throwing a smoke bomb during the Toffees' Premier League win over Chelsea last month.

While celebrating after scoring the game's only goal early in the second half, the Brazilian picked up an object which had been thrown onto the playing surface before hurling it back towards an empty part of the ground, albeit close to the stands.

Footage from Sky Sports showed the smoke bomb striking the side of the stands at Goodison Park before falling back to the ground.

A statement released by the FA on Wednesday confirmed the Brazilian's charge, noting he had until June 8 to provide a response.

Shortly after the charge was announced, Richarlison posted an image of himself holding up the smoke bomb to his official social media accounts.

Richarlison played a crucial role as Everton maintained their Premier League status despite enduring an underwhelming campaign under both Rafael Benitez and Frank Lampard, ending the season with more league goals (10) and assists (five) than any other Toffees player.

The Brazil forward's charge comes just one day after boss Lampard was fined £30,000 by the FA following his own charge of improper conduct, having suggested a penalty which was not awarded to Everton in April's Merseyside derby defeat to Liverpool at Anfield would been given to their opponents. 

The Football Association (FA) has fined Frank Lampard £30,000 after the Everton manager was charged with improper conduct.

Everton, who secured Premier League survival with a dramatic 3-2 win over Crystal Palace on May 19, lost 2-0 to their Merseyside rivals Liverpool at Anfield on April 24.

However, Lampard was left infuriated when referee Stuart Attwell failed to give a penalty after Joel Matip bundled into Anthony Gordon early in the second half when the game was goalless. 

He said during a post-match news conference: "If that was [Mohamed] Salah at the other end, he gets a penalty. You don't get them here. That's the reality of football sometimes." 

The FA asked Lampard for an explanation of his comments and subsequently issued a charge of improper conduct by attacking the integrity of the referees.

Lampard responded to that claim but denied the charge, and for that he has now been fined.

A tweet from the FA Spokesperson account read: "An independent regulatory commission has fined Frank Lampard £30,000 after finding a charge against him for breaching FA Rule E3 in relation to media comments proven during a personal hearing.

"The Everton FC manager made the comments after their Premier League game against Liverpool FC on Sunday 24 April 2022, and he denied that they constitute improper conduct as they imply bias and/or attack the integrity of the match referee – or referees generally – and/or bringing the game into disrepute contrary to FA Rule E3.1."

The Football Association (FA) has condemned pitch-invading fans after a number of high-profile incidents of violence near the end of the English league season.

Earlier on Friday, Merseyside Police announced they had launched an investigation into an altercation between Crystal Palace manager Patrick Vieira and a fan, after Everton supporters flooded onto the Goodison Park pitch to celebrate the Toffees securing Premier League safety with a 3-2 comeback victory.

Widely circulated footage appeared to show Vieira kicking out at the fan after being goaded, while this week also saw a Nottingham Forest supporter jailed and given a stadium ban after attacking Sheffield United player Billy Sharp following a Championship play-off semi-final at the City Ground.

Elsewhere, Swindon Town players were allegedly physically and verbally abused during a pitch invasion at Port Vale, while a Northampton Town fan appeared to shove a Mansfield Town player during League Two's other play-off semi-final tie.

English football's governing body has now moved to condemn the scenes and confirmed it is investigating each of the pitch invasions to have taken place over recent days.

"We are very concerned about the rise in anti-social behaviour from fans as we reach the end of the season," a statement from the FA began.

"Football stadiums should always be a safe and enjoyable space for everyone, and these incidents are completely unacceptable and have no place in our game.

"It is illegal to enter the pitch area in any stadium and these actions are putting players, fans and people who run the game at great risk. This simply cannot continue, and we can confirm that we are investigating all of the incidences. 

"Clubs play a vital role in addressing this issue and they need to prevent pitch invasions from occurring, as well as taking their own action against those that break the rules and the law.

"The FA will be seeking to do all that it can to work with clubs as well as addressing the issues from a disciplinary perspective. We are also reviewing our regulations to help stamp this behaviour out and to ensure the safety of everyone inside a stadium."

The Football Association has denied reports that it plans to replace 'Three Lions' as England's official World Cup anthem for Qatar 2022.

British newspaper The Sun claimed on Thursday that The FA is reviewing other options over concerns the song, which has been a fans' favourite since Euro 96, offends other nations.

Luka Modric said after Croatia's win over England in the 2018 World Cup semi-final that his side were additionally motivated to win due to the song's lyrics.

It had been suggested that 'Sweet Caroline', which became synonymous with England's run to last year's Euro 2020 final, would replace the Baddiel and Skinner hit.

However, the FA has released a statement denying that is the case.

"Contrary to reports this morning, The FA still plays Three Lions at major Wembley matches and has never had any intention of doing otherwise," the statement read.

"The song belongs to the fans and is about the hope of following the England team. 

"It was requested by The FA to be played as one of our team songs at the 2018 World Cup and at the EUROs last summer, and this is our plan at tournaments going forwards."

The Football Association (FA) has charged Frank Lampard with improper conduct after the Everton manager vented his frustrations at not being awarded a penalty against Liverpool.

Everton, who beat Chelsea on Sunday to go back to within two points of safety with five games remaining in their Premier League campaign, lost 2-0 to their quadruple-chasing Merseyside rivals at Anfield on April 24.

Andrew Robertson and Divock Origi punctured Everton's resolve but the Toffees were infuriated when referee Stuart Attwell failed to give a penalty after Joel Matip bundled into Anthony Gordon early in the second half when the game was goalless. 

Lampard told a post-match news conference: "If that was [Mohamed] Salah at the other end, he gets a penalty. You don't get them here. That's the reality of football sometimes." 

The FA asked Lampard for an explanation of his comments last week, which the Chelsea great said he responded to, and the governing body has now issued a charge.

A statement issued via the FA Spokesperson Twitter account read: "Frank Lampard has been charged with a breach of FA Rule E3 in relation to post-match media comments that he made following Everton FC's Premier League match against Liverpool FC on Sunday 24 April 2022. It is alleged that the manager's comments constitute improper conduct as they imply bias and/or attack the integrity of the match referee – or referees generally – and/or bring the game into disrepute."

Lampard has until May 9 to respond. 

Everton are also waiting to discover what punishment, if any, Richarlison will face after the forward threw a smoke bomb that had been launched onto the pitch in the wake of his winning goal against Chelsea back towards the stands, albeit into an unoccupied section of Goodison Park.

The Football Association insists it intends to work with the UK government to ensure both FA Cup semi-finals have sell-out crowds.

Questions have been raised whether Chelsea fans will be able to attend the game against Crystal Palace at Wembley Stadium with the club still working under government-imposed sanctions, preventing them from making a profit by selling match tickets.

Blues owner Roman Abramovich was sanctioned by the UK government following Russia's invasion of Ukraine and had his assets frozen, after he announced his intentions to sell the Premier League club earlier in March.

A statement released on Monday by the FA confirmed its desire to discuss the matter with the government to potentially allow Blues fans to attend the game, scheduled to take place on April 16 or 17.

"We hope to have sell-out crowds at both of our Emirates FA Cup semi-finals at Wembley Stadium," the statement read.

"This includes tickets for Chelsea supporters for their match against Crystal Palace, and we are working with the government on a method to achieve this whilst respecting the sanctions that are currently in place on Chelsea."

Chelsea later stated their gratitude for the FA's efforts in the matter, writing on Twitter: "We are grateful for the FA's continuing efforts to help us find a solution." 

The other semi-final will see Manchester City face Liverpool, with uncertainty around the arrangements for that game also after it emerged that there are currently no scheduled trains between Manchester or Liverpool and London for that weekend.

FIFA has confirmed Russia must compete in their upcoming matches as the Football Union of Russia (RFU).

The order from world football's governing body comes in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which began on Thursday, with fighting having escalated over the weekend.

FIFA has been put under increasing pressure to sanction Russia, with UEFA having already stripped St Petersburg of this season's Champions League final, while the football associations of Poland, Sweden and the Czech Republic all jointly outlined their refusal to play Russia.

This cast doubt over next month's World Cup qualifiers, with Poland set to face Russia in a play-off semi-final, with the winner of that match to play either Sweden or the Czech Republic for a place in Qatar.

On Sunday, FIFA confirmed Russia would have to play under a neutral banner of the RFU, similar to how the International Olympic Committee had the country's athletes represent the Russian Olympic Committee following a state-sponsored doping scandal.

Russia's flag cannot be displayed, nor can their anthem be played, and all of their home matches must now take place at a neutral venue, behind closed doors.

A statement read: "FIFA would like to reiterate its condemnation of the use of force by Russia in its invasion of Ukraine. Violence is never a solution and FIFA expresses its deepest solidarity to all people affected by what is happening in Ukraine.

"FIFA calls again for the urgent restoration of peace and for constructive dialogue to commence immediately. FIFA remains in close contact with the Ukrainian Association of Football and members of the Ukrainian football community who have been requesting support to leave the country for as long as the current conflict persists."

"With regard to the upcoming FIFA World Cup 2022 qualifiers, FIFA has taken good note of the positions expressed via social media by the Polish Football Association, the Football Association of the Czech Republic and the Swedish Football Association and has already engaged in dialogue with all of these football associations. FIFA will remain in close contact to seek to find appropriate and acceptable solutions together."

However, FIFA's sanctions do not go far enough, according to Polish FA president Cezary Kulesza, who tweeted: "Today's FIFA decision is totally unacceptable.

"We are not interested in participating in this game of appearances. Our stance remains intact: Polish National Team will NOT PLAY with Russia, no matter what the name of the team is."

FIFA's sanctions followed on from the English FA confirming it would boycott any upcoming matches against Russia for the foreseeable future, at any level.

England will boycott international football fixtures with Russia "for the foreseeable future" in response to the conflict in Ukraine, the Football Association (FA) has confirmed.

After weeks of heightening political tensions, Russia invaded neighbouring Ukraine on Thursday, with the conflict having escalated over the weekend.

Russia's actions have been widely condemned, with political, financial and sporting sanctions imposed.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) called on all international sporting federations to relocate or cancel any events set to take place in Russia or Belarus, while St Petersburg was stripped of the 2021-22 Champions League final by UEFA and Formula One removed the Russian Grand Prix from its 2022 calendar.

The FA has followed suit and will refuse to take part in any fixture with Russia for the foreseeable future as a show of solidarity for Ukraine.

"Out of solidarity with Ukraine and to wholeheartedly condemn the atrocities being committed by the Russian leadership, the FA can confirm that we won't play against Russia in any international fixtures for the foreseeable future," a statement released by the FA read.

"This includes any potential match at any level of senior, age group or para football."

The FA's stance comes after Poland, Sweden and the Czech Republic all announced that they will boycott matches against Russia in the upcoming World Cup qualification play-off rounds.

A number of prominent footballing figures, including Robert Lewandowski, have spoken out in support of that decision, while Sunday's EFL Cup final between Chelsea and Liverpool at Wembley was preceded by a united display of support for the Ukrainian people.

Arsenal have been fined by the Football Association for failing to control their players' conduct during their 2-1 Premier League defeat to Manchester City.

League leaders City snatched a late winner through Rodri at the Emirates Stadium on New Year's Day, in a match littered with contentious moments.

Arsenal were convinced they should have had a penalty for Ederson's tackle on Martin Odegaard in the first half, while they were then left outraged that a spot-kick was awarded City's way for Granit Xhaka's challenge on Bernardo Silva.

Gabriel Magalhaes was booked for dissent during the aftermath of that decision, with the centre-back then receiving another booking two minutes later for clattering into Gabriel Jesus.

Arsenal's players surrounded referee Stuart Attwell and, for that, the club have been handed an FA fine of £20,000.

An FA statement said Arsenal had "failed to control their players in an orderly fashion".

The Gunners have accepted the fine and admitted the charge, meaning there will be no appeal.

After the game, goalkeeper Aaron Ramsdale and assistant coach Albert Stuivenberg, who stood in for the isolating Mikel Arteta, questioned the consistency of the officiating, in particular the use of VAR.

Arsenal's defeat allowed West Ham and Tottenham, who both won, to close the gap to one and two points respectively.

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