Tom Brady made more NFL history in Sunday's thrilling 16-13 Tampa Bay Buccaneers' win over the Los Angeles Rams but he says it was all about the win and not personal records.

Brady became the first player in NFL history to throw more than 100,000 career yards on a 15-yard fourth-quarter completion to Leonard Fournette.

That was before Brady took over to win the game for the Bucs who were down 13-9 with 44 seconds remaining, going five-of-six for 60 yards on the game-winning drive, the record 55th of his career.

Not only did Brady achieve those new feats, but he notched his 43rd career fourth-quarter comeback, tying Peyton Manning for the most by an NFL starting quarterback.

Brady declared "that was awesome, that was f****** awesome" to open his post-game press conference, referring to the come-from-behind win, not the records.

"It's all about the win," Brady added. "It's all about the win, man. I never cared about the [records]. All about the win."

Bucs head coach Todd Bowles was full of praise for 45-year-old Brady who completed 36 of 58 passes for 280 yards and one TD.

"We always have a chance with [Brady]," Bowles said. "We're grateful to have him. He got over 100,000 yards - that's a long-playing career for anybody. He's still playing at a high level. We love the guy to death.

"You run out of things to say about him. I'm sure I can't say anything different than the 50 million people that [have] already commented things on him. He's a great player.

"He's one of the best, if not the best to ever play the game, and he continues to do that."

The win improved the Bucs' record to 4-5 to regain top spot in the NFC South after the Atlanta Falcons lost 20-17 to the Los Angeles Chargers.

Tom Brady made more NFL history in Sunday's thrilling 16-13 Tampa Bay Buccaneers' win over the Los Angeles Rams but he says it was all about the win and not personal records.

Brady became the first player in NFL history to throw more than 100,000 career yards on a 15-yard fourth-quarter completion to Leonard Fournette.

That was before Brady took over to win the game for the Bucs who were down 13-9 with 44 seconds remaining, going five-of-six for 60 yards on the game-winning drive, the record 55th of his career.

Not only did Brady achieve those new feats, but he notched his 43rd career fourth-quarter comeback, tying Peyton Manning for the most by an NFL starting quarterback.

Brady declared "that was awesome, that was f****** awesome" to open his post-game press conference, referring to the come-from-behind win, not the records.

"It's all about the win," Brady added. "It's all about the win, man. I never cared about the [records]. All about the win."

Bucs head coach Todd Bowles was full of praise for 45-year-old Brady who completed 36 of 58 passes for 280 yards and one TD.

"We always have a chance with [Brady]," Bowles said. "We're grateful to have him. He got over 100,000 yards - that's a long-playing career for anybody. He's still playing at a high level. We love the guy to death.

"You run out of things to say about him. I'm sure I can't say anything different than the 50 million people that [have] already commented things on him. He's a great player.

"He's one of the best, if not the best to ever play the game, and he continues to do that."

The win improved the Bucs' record to 4-5 to regain top spot in the NFC South after the Atlanta Falcons lost 20-17 to the Los Angeles Chargers.

Steve Nash said the Brooklyn Nets should look to "grow through this together" after a number of fans wore 'Fight Antisemitism' T-shirts in protest against Kyrie Irving's recent highlighting of a controversial film.

The 30-year-old Irving tweeted a link to 'Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America' last Thursday, with Brooklyn Nets owner Joe Tsai condemning Irving for promoting the documentary film. Tsai alleged the film was "full of anti-Semitic disinformation".

The Nets and NBA released strong statements refusing to tolerate "hate speech", while coach Nash said the star guard had been spoken to prior to Saturday's 125-116 loss to the Indiana Pacers.

Irving said at the weekend he would not "stand down" and pointed to the "historical complexities" of African heritage in America, but he subsequently deleted the social media post that sparked the uproar.

Nash spoke again on the matter after Monday's 116-109 win against the Pacers, which saw a group of seven Nets fans conspicuous at courtside in the protest T-shirts.

They were Orthodox Jews, the New York Post reported, quoting one of the fans, Aaron Jungreis, as saying the Nets "should not keep a guy like that around", with regard to Irving. The fan also told the newspaper the Nets should "have to discipline him in some way".

Looking at how Irving has handled the episode, Nash said: "That's an ongoing conversation. I haven't been a part of those internal talks, to be honest. I've been coaching, preparing the team. But I know they're looking at that constantly."

Erasing the controversial social media content appears to have been taken as a positive step, with Nash saying that "certainly helps".

The Nets coach added: "I just hope that we all grow through this together. There's always an opportunity for us to grow and understand new perspectives.

"I think the organisation is trying to take that stance that we communicate through this and all come out in a better position with more understanding and wanting to have empathy for every side of this debate and situation."

Irving last week wrote on Twitter: "I am an OMNIST and I meant no disrespect to anyone's religious beliefs. The 'Anti-Semitic' label that is being pushed on me is not justified and does not reflect the reality or truth I live in everyday. I embrace and want to learn from all walks of life and religions."

Diego Simeone acknowledged Atletico Madrid are still hurting from their early Champions League exit but vowed to battle with the same intensity to qualify for the Europa League.

Atleti failed to make the knockout stages of Europe's premier club competition for the first time in five years after a 2-2 home draw with Bayer Leverkusen last week, in which Yannick Carrasco missed a late penalty.

Simeone's side also trail LaLiga leaders Real Madrid by nine points, while they are winless in their past four Champions League games, their longest run since between December 2008 and December 2009.

Atleti failed to win in nine games in that period before the appointment of Simeone, who admitted he and his players are still reeling from their elimination ahead of Tuesday's clash at Porto.

"Today we are out of the Champions League. It hurts us, it p****s me off because of the responsibility we have with many people who grow up in the club," the Atleti coach said.

"But it's a reality and we can't go against it. Reality is what we have and I invited us all to be together and see if we can express what we feel on the pitch."

Simeone insisted he is no stranger to an unfavourable situation in the Spanish capital, but suggested not letting those around the club down remains his primary concern.

"In my fourth year the same thing was said, in the sixth the same," the 52-year-old said of recent criticism. "In the [coronavirus] pandemic we were sixth and with a lot of work we achieved our goals. 

"In the following season it seemed that we could not win LaLiga and we won it. Last season, the same – with 14 games to go, the group and the people came together to get back together.

"I suffer more for the people who work and have been around for years. People are always with us. There are things that we did not do well, but competitively I have nothing to complain about. 

"I'm ready to compete, I don't know how to do it any other way. I was raised that way, knowing that you can lose, but it's nicer to win."

Simeone has his sights on the Europa League, needing to match Bayer Leverkusen's result against Club Brugge when they visit Porto to secure third place in Group B.

"They taught me since I was a child to always compete and now we can get in the Europa League," he continued. "For this we have to be strong and want it.

"We will go [every] match with our [best team], knowing that we are not in the Champions League but the Europa League is important."

Jake Paul called out Nate Diaz for his next fight after downing his "idol" Anderson Silva on Saturday.

Paul extended to 6-0 with a third victory against MMA competitors, defeating former middleweight champion Silva in a boxing contest on a unanimous decision at Desert Diamond Arena.

Tyron Woodley and Ben Askren are the other two UFC fighters to fall to Paul, who labelled UFC legend Silva as his hero after a memorable performance that saw him knock down the Brazilian in the eighth round.

"I feel like I'm living in a movie," Paul said after the victory. "You couldn't have written this in a story.

"Just being in the ring with him, seeing his heart, his courage, his bravery, that's the champion that I looked up to.

"He's such an inspiration. He was my idol growing up. He inspired me to be great."

Silva defeated former world champion Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., after leaving UFC in 2020, and proved a much tougher task for Paul, who indicated already who he wants his next fight to be.

Diaz, in attendance supporting undercard fighter and team-mate Chris Avila, appeared to slap a member of Paul's team after a backstage altercation saw both camps throw drinks.

Now, Paul wants to face Diaz, who became a free agent after UFC 279, as he looks to extend his growing record.

"Nate Diaz, stop being a b**** and fight me," Paul added. "Everyone wants that fight – Nate, stop fighting people for free, let's do it in the ring."

Kyrie Irving says he will not "stand down" for what he believes in after facing widespread backlash for sharing a film on social media with alleged anti-Semitic connotations.

The 30-year-old tweeted a link to 'Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America' on Thursday, with Brooklyn Nets owner Joe Tsai condemning Irving for promoting a film "full of anti-Semitic disinformation".

The Nets and NBA both released strong statements refusing to tolerate "hate speech", while coach Steve Nash said the star guard had been spoken to prior to Saturday's 125-116 loss to the Indiana Pacers.

However, speaking after the game against the Pacers at Barclays Center, Irving suggested he had not done anything wrong and would continue to speak with freedom.

"I'm not here to argue over a person or a culture or a religion and what they believe," Irving said. "Nah, this is what's here. It's on a public platform.

"Did I do anything illegal? Did I hurt anybody? Did I harm anybody? Am I going out and saying that I hate one specific group of people?

"So out of all the judgement that people got for me posting, without talking to me, and then I respect what Joe [Tsai] said, but there has a lot to do with not ego or pride of how proud I am to be [of] African heritage, but also to be living as a free black man here in America, knowing the historical complexities for me to get here.

"So I'm not going to stand down on anything that I believe in. I'm only going to get stronger because I'm not alone. I have a whole army around me."

Irving had earlier defended his actions on Twitter, where his shared post still remains, stating the "anti-Semitic label" on him was "not justified", nor did he intend to disrespect "anyone's beliefs".

The Nets fell to a fourth straight loss of the season against the Pacers, though Nash does not believe the Irving situation influenced Brooklyn's performance.

"I don't think our group is overly affected by the situation," Nash said. "We've had so many situations over the last one or two years that I think we've kind of built an immunity to some of it.

"I also think our guys aren't that familiar with the material."

Star Nets forward Kevin Durant echoed Nash's comments, suggesting Brooklyn would pay no attention to those outside of the locker room.

"Absolutely not," Durant responded when asked if the furore had impacted his side. "The only impact is you guys and everybody outside the locker room."

Steve Nash implored the Brooklyn Nets to "care more" after falling to their fourth straight loss, with Ben Simmons revealing the side met for a players-only meeting to discuss problems.

Indiana Pacers recorded a 125-116 victory on Saturday, the fourth time in six games the Nets have conceded 125 points or more, as Nash's side dropped to 1-5 this season.

Brooklyn host the Pacers again on Monday and Nash outlined his frustrations with the Nets as he urged his team to show more commitment.

"It was a disaster," coach Nash said. "How else do you say it? I didn't see the will, didn't see the desire, or the connectivity necessary to get stops and get rebounds.

"We just got to make a bigger commitment and it's got to mean more and we got to care more.

"We have to look deep inside ourselves and what we want to do. What do we want to accomplish? Do we want to give up on this because it's been difficult early or do we want to stay the course and start to build something?

"We've had a lot of really good days here early in the season and we've lost a couple of games; it shakes our mentality, it has shaken our mentality hard.

"And we're not seeing the same competitive spirit, same purpose, and if we don't clean that up it's not going to get better. It's the only way to get out of difficult positions is to have character and competitive spirit."

The Nets have been largely reliant on Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving thus far, the pair scoring 61 points at Barclays Center, and the former acknowledged Brooklyn must improve soon.

"It was a s***ty night," Durant said. "Excuse my language, it was a bad night. We're p***ed. We enjoy basketball.

"We like to win, though, so of course when we lose the games it's going to be a sombre mood in the locker room. But it will change once we start playing some good basketball.

"We got a lot of basketball to be played ahead of us."

While Nash urged his team to up their effort levels, Simmons suggested the Nets are confronting their problems after a meeting between the players following the defeat.

"It was honest," Simmons said of the meeting. "We had a conversation. Obviously, I'm not going to talk about it, but it was honest.

"That's what winning teams do. Hold each other accountable, be able to be open and talk to your team-mates, and respect that and be men."

Kyrie Irving is being met with severe backlash, including from owner of the Brooklyn Nets Joe Tsai, after sharing a link on social media to a movie "full of anti-Semitic disinformation".

On Thursday, Irving tweeted out a link to a movie on Amazon Prime called 'Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America' – his tweet remains up as of Saturday - and he also shared the same image to his Instagram story.

The 2018 movie is based on a 2015 book of the same name, and includes troubling assertions.

In a team statement, the Nets said: "The Brooklyn Nets strongly condemn and have no tolerance for the promotion of any form of hate speech. 

"We believe that in these situations, our first action must be open, honest dialogue.

"We thank those, including the ADL [Anti-Defamation League], who have been supportive during this time."

Tsai also released his own statement that he posted on his personal Twitter account.

"I’m disappointed that Kyrie appears to support a film based on a book full of anti-semitic disinformation," he said. 

"I want to sit down and make sure he understands this is hurtful to all of us, and as a man of faith, it is wrong to promote hate based on race, ethnicity or religion."

He then posted a follow-up tweet saying "this is bigger than basketball".

Irving is yet to comment on the situation, which is sure to dominate the lead-up to the Nets' home game against the Indiana Pacers on Saturday.

The New York Giants continue to have their doubters despite improving their record to 6-1.

But rookie pass rusher Kayvon Thibodeaux has a clear message for those who are still not taking the Giants seriously following their 23-17 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars. 

"F*** 'em, f*** all the people around the league," said Thibodeaux to NJ Advance Media.

"The only people that matter are the people in this room. The only people that are going to dictate what happens on Sunday are the people in this room. Excuse my French.

"I mean, listen, I think the greatest thing we do is we fight for respect in the locker room. When you're on that battlefield, I want you to not respect me."

The Giants came from 17-13 down to see off the Jaguars, who narrowly missed out on claiming a game-winning touchdown as wide receiver Christian Kirk was stopped a yard short of the endzone in the final seconds.

The unconvincing nature of the victory will likely do little to quiet those questioning the Giants' legitimacy. New York have trailed in all seven games this year, with this victory marking their sixth comeback of a remarkable season.

But safety Xavier McKinney echoed the sentiments of team-mate Thibodeaux.

"I really don't even care for that question anymore," McKinney said. "I'm kind of tired of answering it because it's the same thing every week.

"Obviously, we know that. I really don't care. We don't care as a team. The only thing we can do is keep focusing on what we can do and keep getting better."

Arizona Cardinals quarterback Kyler Murray and head coach Kliff Kingsbury have played down their heated exchange during a win over the New Orleans Saints.

The Cardinals snapped an eight-game home losing streak with a 42-34 victory on Thursday, as the visitors' stand-in QB Andy Dalton threw three interceptions.

For Arizona, Murray completed 20 of his 29 passes for 204 yards and one touchdown with no interceptions, but he also made headlines through his second-quarter row with Kingsbury.

Murray appeared to shout, "calm the f*** down" at his coach on two occasions, but insisted there was no ill feeling between the pair after the win.

"The clock was running down and we couldn't get off the play that we were trying to run," Murray said. "So, it was... I guess it's my fault. I'll take it.

"We're good. We're going to make it right. We ended up scoring so that was good. But, yes, that's all I was saying, just chill out.

"It doesn't faze me, and I don't think it fazes him. We're just trying to win. [It was an] in the moment type of thing. After that, we're good."

Kingsbury shared Murray's view of the incident, adding he liked to see such levels of competitiveness from his QB.

"I mean, it's good," Kingsbury said. "I think we are working through, as an offense, where we want to be and what we want to do. 

"When you have competitors that have a level of intensity like that, I think it will keep pushing us forward."

The Cardinals' win represented their first 40-plus-point game since January 1, 2017, breaking the longest streak in the NFL of 87 games, and took them to 3-0-4 for the season.

Tyson Fury praised Derek Chisora for accepting a December 3 fight, aiming a not-so-subtle dig towards Oleksandr Usyk and Anthony Joshua.

The two heavyweights will go toe-to-toe at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium with Fury's WBC belt on the line, after the Gypsy King was unable to secure an agreement to fight either Usyk or Joshua.

That led to disappointment among fans, with the initial reception for a trilogy bout against Chisora not a positive one, but Fury always intended to fight before the end of the year and says his opponent has "balls" which others in the division lack.

"You've got the so-called guys in the division, the 'top guys', we offer them fights but there's no smoke. You offer it to Chisora, boom, he's sat here opposite me," Fury said in Thursday's press conference.

"The man has got balls. In today's society, in this boxing game, there's a lack of balls. You know who you are, these people who don't want smoke.

"With Chisora, he does what it says on the tin, he goes to war. We're going to get a war. I did outbox him comfortably the second time, but his style has changed and so has mine.

"When you've got two heavy forces colliding with two heavy bombs, someone is getting knocked out. If he lands a big punch on me, I'm getting knocked out. If I land a big swing on him, he's getting knocked out.

"The fans are going to win, 100 per cent. I promised Chisora for years that we would have a third fight. We're going to put on a hell of a fight."

Promoter Frank Warren has outlined Fury's future in the ring beyond the trilogy bout against Chisora, with a proposed unification bout against Usyk still planned for the first quarter of next year.

"If Tyson comes through December 3, he's going to fight Oleksandr Usyk and after that he may wind up fighting Joe Joyce," Warren told TalkSport.

When he arrived as the New York Giants head coach this offseason, Brian Daboll preached the importance of continuing to compete regardless of the scoreline.

Through six weeks of the 2022 season, it could not be more clear they have absorbed that message.

The Giants improved to 5-1 on Sunday with another comeback win, this time over the Baltimore Ravens.

Baltimore led 20-10 with under 13 minutes remaining in the fourth quarter at MetLife Stadium. However, the Giants produced an improbable turnaround as Daniel Jones connected with Daniel Bellinger for an eight-yard touchdown and, after Lamar Jackson was intercepted by Julian Love, Saquon Barkley rushed for his second game-winning score in as many weeks.

Kayvon Thibodeaux then sacked Jackson, forcing a fumble that sealed victory for the Giants, who sit second in the NFC East behind the 6-0 Philadelphia Eagles.

The win over the Ravens followed the Giants' dramatic triumph in London, in which they recovered from a 17-3 deficit to stun the Green Bay Packers 27-22. 

Daboll's men have trailed in all six of their games this season, with their five comeback wins the most in the NFL.

"It's something we’ve preached since day one — since we've been here: coaches, people in the building," Daboll said.

"This league is hard. It’s not always going to be perfect. There will be a lot of people down on you. And you might be down on yourself, wish you could do better.

"But you keep on getting back up. You keep on swinging, keep on competing, regardless of the score or the situation of the game. And that’s not easy to do, right? That’s not easy to do when you're down.

"If you sit on the bench and start bitching and complaining, that’s easy to do. It’s hard to stick with it and get ready to play the next series and not worry about if you just got beat on a pass or if you got sacked. You've got to flush it pretty quick."

The Ravens will want to flush away the memory of this defeat in short order, but their latest collapse was a continuation of a theme for Baltimore.

All three of their defeats have come by one score and in the final minutes. They are the 39th team in NFL history to hold a double-digit lead in all of their first six games, but the only one not to have a winning record.

"When you are your own biggest enemy, that's really something that can frustrate anyone," Ravens left tackle Ronnie Stanley said. "We know how much talent we have on this team. We're going to pull it together. That's kind of the frustration that everybody has."

Jackson added: "We just can't keep beating ourselves up because that's what it is. It is not our opponent ... I feel like we just beating ourselves with little mistakes here and there."

Despite their consistent failure to close games out, Ravens head coach John Harbaugh is upbeat they can still be a contender in the AFC.

"We'll regroup, we'll go to work, and we're going to find ourselves as a football team," Harbaugh said.

"That's what we have to do right now: find ourselves as a football team. We have an opportunity to be a very good football team. We can be as good as we want to be and decide to be."

Washington Commanders quarterback Carson Wentz is facing a spell out of action after fracturing his finger, according to reports.

The Commanders beat the Chicago Bears 12-7 on Thursday to move 2-4 for the season, with Wentz playing the whole game. He was sacked three times and did not make a touchdown pass, throwing for just 99 yards.

However, on Saturday NFL media reported the 29-year-old – who was traded from the Indianapolis Colts ahead of the 2022 season – had suffered a fracture to the ring finger on his right hand.

Wentz, who had been suffering with a bicep issue before the game, played on with the fracture, despite being in clear pain, and will now see a specialist in Los Angeles to determine the next step in his treatment.

The injury comes after Commanders coach Ron Rivera hit back at suggestions he was not enthusiastic about the signing of Wentz.

Rivera said during his post-game news conference after the win over the Bears: "Everybody keeps wanting to say, I didn’t want anything to do with Carson.

"Well bull****. I'm the f****** guy that pulled out the sheets of paper, that looked at the analytics, that watched the tape when we were in Indianapolis.

"That's what p***** me off, because the young man doesn't deserve to have that all the time. I'm sorry, I'm done."

Rivera's outburst came after he had claimed a reason behind his team's poor start compared to the rest of the NFC East was at "quarterback", though he subsequently apologised and insisted he had not meant to disparage Wentz, who has thrown for 10 touchdowns this season.

Ron Rivera angrily hit out as suggestions he was not an enthused as Washington Commanders owner Daniel Snyder by the signing of quarterback Carson Wentz.

In the wake of Thursday's 12-7 win over the Chicago Bears at Soldier Field, coach Rivera was in fiery form at his post-game press conference, eventually calling a halt to proceedings himself.

ESPN this week quoted an unnamed source as saying that the signing of Wentz in a March trade from the Indianapolis Colts was "100 per cent a Dan move".

Wentz came into the Bears game carrying a bicep injury, managing only 12 of 22 passes for 99 yards with no TDs.

However, Rivera wanted to make it clear that his own role in the signing of Wentz was integral to the trade going ahead.

"Everybody keeps wanting to say, I didn’t want anything to do with Carson," Rivera said.

"Well bull****. I'm the f****** guy that pulled out the sheets of paper, that looked at the analytics, that watched the tape when we were in Indianapolis.

"That's what p***** me off, because the young man doesn't deserve to have that all the time. I'm sorry, I'm done."

The expletive-laden torrent from Rivera followed an assessment of how the team's 1-4 start had been wearing on his players.

Finally getting a second win, after losing four straight games, came as a relief to Rivera, prompting him to unload.

Brian Robinson Jr scored the decisive touchdown, two months after being shot in the knee and glute in an attempted carjacking on August 28.

"Honestly it's been hard. It really has. You lose four games in a row and everybody wants to get on you," Rivera said.

"They've played their a**es off. They've played their a**es off for everybody. They come out, they show up, and they work hard, they don't complain.

"They hear all this stuff and they've got to deal with that. I respect them for that because they're resilient."

Ben Simmons acknowledges that part of being Ben Simmons means he is going to hear plenty of criticism via social media.

The Brooklyn Nets swingman, who has often been on the wrong end of tough criticism, also understands that it is just social media and he can’t let it bother him.

The 26-year-old once again received plenty of jibes after a video of him airballing a shot during an event in a Brooklyn park on Sunday went viral.

It was just another instance of insults directed at the former number one overall pick, but he understands he just has to brush it off.

"It finds me all the time," Simmons told ESPN prior to Wednesday night's preseason game against the Milwaukee Bucks. "And it doesn't f---ing stop. Sometimes I'm even sick of it, but then I'm like, 'OK, I'm Ben Simmons, you know? It comes with being Ben Simmons right now'.

"Even the other day there was a clip of me airballing a shot at the park. Meanwhile, like 10 guys airballed multiple shots. So it's like people will find one clip and try to make it that everything - like Ben can't do [this or that].

"Like come on man, you think I'm just airballing every shot? It's not true. But it comes with it, and you got to have tough skin and I realize that, but nah, I can't take everything personally. It's social media."

And there has been plenty of hostility aimed his way over social media in the last 16 months - despite him not playing a game in that time.

In the 2021 Eastern Conference semifinals, he was ridiculed mercilessly for passing up a wide-open dunk late in the Philadelphia 76ers’ Game 7 loss to the Atlanta Hawks.

That was his final game for the Sixers, as he sat out last season due to mental health concerns while being called soft by his critics. He then never suited up for the Nets after being acquired at the trade deadline due to a lingering back injury.

Simmons, though, tells himself the reason he is on the receiving end of so much mockery is because he can still produce at a high level on the court.

"Because people know what I can do, what I'm capable of," Simmons said. "I believe that's what it is. Like if I was somebody that wasn't capable of doing certain things, I don't think people would be on my ass as much.

"And I don't mind it because it kind of motivates me in a way. Obviously, sometimes it's a lot for anybody to deal with that, but I look at it a little bit like a respect thing, in a way."

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