Everton gave their late chairman Bill Kenwright the send-off he would have wanted as ex-Burnley duo James Tarkowski and Dwight McNeil played a major part in the 3-0 Carabao Cup victory over their former club.

On a night when the fanbase, which has often been divided over the role of Kenwright spanning almost two decades, rose as one to mark his death last week at the age of 78, the team ensured the occasion was marked in fitting fashion.

Tarkowski’s header opened the scoring in the 13th minute and the centre-back’s aerial prowess came to the fore early in the second half when he nodded McNeil’s header back into the danger area for Amadou Onana to poke home from close range.

Ashley Young’s first Everton goal in added time came courtesy of substitute Beto’s driving run along the byline, handing Toffees manager Sean Dyche victory against his former side.

The scoreline flattered Burnley, struggling after promotion straight back to the Premier League, whose side registering seven changes struggled to lay a glove on their hosts.

They were no match for Everton, watched by owner Farhad Moshiri for the first time in over two years, and they are growing in confidence after a fifth victory in seven matches – their best run in a non-Covid-19 season since May 2019.

From the moment Tarkowski buried a header from a McNeil cross the result was barely in doubt.

The centre-back’s celebration was low-key against his former team but McNeil, whose first-half stint on the left wing put him in the firing line of the travelling support, turned and cupped his ear to Clarets fans.

And he almost silenced them completely with a drive just over from the edge of the penalty area.

Burnley’s inability to play out from the back against better quality opposition was highlighted when Dara O’Shea, one of four players to be retained from the Bournemouth defeat, passed straight to Dominic Calvert-Lewin and was fortunate the striker’s low shot was off target.

McNeil’s harsh treatment from the visiting fans was extended onto the pitch when Ameen Al-Dakhil, another player keeping his place, was booked for chopping him down as he threatened to break.

Burnley’s best chance was denied by a sliding James Garner cutting out a cross which was destined to be a Jay Rodriguez tap-in at the far post.

Everton – particularly goalkeeper Jordan Pickford making his 250th appearance for the club – were barely extended and more calamitous defending early in the second half led to another goal.

Al-Dakhil lost all perspective of where the ball was, allowing it to bounce off him into the path of Calvert-Lewin whose shot was deflected behind.

Onana delivered the killer blow from the resulting corner and another close-range strike from Young saw Everton coast into the quarter-finals.

Everton paid tribute to Bill Kenwright as his long-term partner Jenny Seagrove, daughter Lucy and former Toffees striker and manager Joe Royle laid wreaths before the Carabao Cup match with Burnley.

As the trio walked to the centre-circle before kick-off at Goodison Park, Elton John’s ‘I Guess That’s Why They Call It The Blues’ was played and a minute’s applause was held for Kenwright, who was chairman for almost two decades and died last week at the age of 78.

A blue and white scarf was also placed on his seat in the directors’ box, where he had not sat since January due to security issues after a number of fan protests.

Owner Farhad Moshiri – making his first appearance at Goodison Park in more than two years – led the tributes in the matchday programme, saying: “Bill was a force of nature and he certainly changed my life nearly 10 years ago when he first spoke to me about getting involved with the club.

“The new Everton stadium at Bramley-Moore Dock will provide an iconic new home for the club and will stand as a lasting legacy to his memory.

“I will miss no longer hearing his voice on the end of a telephone many times each day, talking about players, plotting how the club can do better and better.

“He was a special soul, a man successful in so many different walks of life. We will miss him but never forget him.”

Manager Sean Dyche said Kenwright was a “perfect gentleman and an incredibly passionate individual whose love for Everton was infectious”.

Captain Seamus Coleman said he could not thank ‘The Chairman’ – as he always called him – enough for his personal support when he made the move from Sligo to Goodison Park as a 20-year-old.

He said: “The chairman knew that my family would be concerned about me and he assured them time and time again I would be looked after.”

A number of former managers appointed under Kenwright’s chairmanship also shared their tributes with Roberto Martinez hailing “a contagious force who lived and breathed Everton”.

David Moyes said: “He gave me a big opportunity in my career when I was a young manager in the lower leagues. He was a wonderful man, brilliantly supportive. I couldn’t have had a better chairman as a young coach.”

Real Madrid boss Carlo Ancelotti said Kenwright was “Everton to the core”, Fulham manager Marco Silva described him as a “great man and a great Evertonian”, while Frank Lampard said he was a “man with a huge personality and even bigger heart”.

Former players also sent their condolences, with Wayne Rooney thanking him personally for his support over the years and adding: “No-one loved the club more.”

Ex-midfielder Tim Cahill said he would “make sure your spirit will live in our football club forever”.

Sean Dyche and Dominic Calvert-Lewin dedicated Everton’s 1-0 victory at West Ham to chairman Bill Kenwright.

The Toffees were playing their first match since the death of Kenwright on Monday at the age of 78.

It was a performance the lifelong Everton fan would surely have been proud of with Calvert-Lewin hitting a superb second-half winner.

“Firstly, and you can’t guarantee it, but it’s befitting to win after the week we’ve had following the sad loss of the chairman,” said Toffees boss Dyche.

“The players know the depth of the chairman’s love for the club, they’re well aware of that.”

Calvert-Lewin revealed the shock of the news affected everyone at Goodison Park.

“No-one was prepared for what happened this week and it has saddened everyone at the club. That one was for Bill,” the striker told Sky Sports.

“He would have been proud of us and proud of how we won – to get the lead, dig in and work so hard. It was a very good day.”

Calvert-Lewin, who has been beset by injuries over the past couple of seasons, looks to be finally getting back to his best.

Six minutes into the second half he played a one-two with Jack Harrison, Cruyff-turned away from Kurt Zouma and Nayef Aguerd and hit a low shot past Alphonse Areola.

It was his 50th Premier League goal for Everton, joining Romelu Lukaku, Duncan Ferguson and Tim Cahill in reaching the half-century.

“Dom’s a very good player who’s had a tough couple of years,” added Dyche.

“He’s very close now, you can tell in his body language and it was a fine finish.

“He looks stronger, sharper. It is a really good marker for him to get to that number.”

A second away win of the season gave Everton a little more breathing space between them and the bottom three.

“This is a tough place to come, they’ve proved that over the last couple of years, so it was a very good performance,” said Dyche.

“We are improving from last season. I think there are clear signs of that.”

For West Ham, it was a third defeat in eight days following reverses at Aston Villa and in the Europa League at Olympiacos.

David Moyes picked an attacking line-up, handing Ghana winger Mohammed Kudus his first start in the Premier League, but their only shot on target came in the 90th minute through substitute Said Benrahma.

“That would be a problem for us,” said Moyes. “But, let’s be fair, that’s the first game we’ve not scored a goal in this season.

“But I agree, I thought we missed chances today, we missed two or three opportunities to score. I don’t think it was ever going to be a game where we had nine or 10 opportunities. I didn’t see it that way for either team.”

Everton ended a difficult week on a positive note as Dominic Calvert-Lewin fired them to a 1-0 win at West Ham.

The Toffees were playing their first match since the death of chairman Bill Kenwright on Monday at the age of 78.

It had been emotional week, too, for Hammers manager David Moyes, who formed a close friendship with Kenwright during his 11-year spell in charge at Goodison Park.

But while West Ham slumped to a third defeat in eight days following reverses at Aston Villa and in the Europa League at Olympiacos, Everton were able to put some more breathing space between themselves and the bottom three with a second away win of the season.

Calvert-Lewin’s goal was his 50th in the Premier League for Everton, joining Romelu Lukaku, Duncan Ferguson and Tim Cahill in reaching the half-century.

It came six minutes into the second half after a first half that will not live long in the memory.

West Ham created an early opportunity when Lucas Paqueta skilfully lifted the ball over Nathan Patterson and drilled in a low cross which Jarrod Bowen could only slice wide.

Moments later Paqueta showed the side of his game which so infuriates Moyes, gifting the ball to Jack Harrison who burst through only to fire too close to Hammers keeper Alphonse Areola.

Ghana winger Mohammed Kudus, making first Premier League start for West Ham, showed he is already getting used to the darker arts of English football after he was chopped down by James Tarkowski.

As Jordan Pickford raced out of his goal to tell the youngster to get up, Kudus shoved the England keeper away in a skirmish which earned both a booking.

Calvert-Lewin had his first chance from Vitalii Mykolenko’s cross but the striker headed over.

A torturous half was summed up by the audible sigh which echoed around the London Stadium when five minutes of stoppage time was announced.

The game desperately needed a goal and it almost came through Bowen, who got on the end of a James Ward-Prowse free-kick but guided his header too high.

Instead the goal arrived at the other end after Jarrad Branthwaite won the ball back for Everton in midfield and fed Calvert-Lewin.

The former England forward played a one-two with Harrison before executing a Cruyff turn which left both Kurt Zouma and Nayef Aguerd flat-footed and firing low past Areola.

It was Calvert-Lewin’s sixth goal in all competitions against the Hammers, the most he has scored against one single club.

Everton almost doubled the lead when Zouma and Aguerd got in another tangle but Areola got down well to tip Aboulaye Doucoure’s shot wide.

The closest West Ham came to an equaliser was a Said Benrahma volley which Pickford kept out at his near post to secure the points.

Everton boss Sean Dyche insists his side is not feeling the pressure following reports of a possible 12-point deduction for alleged financial breaches.

The Toffees are preparing to travel to West Ham on Sunday and will look to bounce back to winning ways following their 2-0 derby defeat to Liverpool last week.

News surfaced this week about a potential violation of the Premier League’s profitability and sustainability regulations during the period leading up to the 2021-22 season but Dyche denies it has added any pressure to him or his side heading into the weekend.

He told a press conference: “Ever since I’ve been here there has been pressure.

“There is pressure on all sorts around Everton Football Club and we’ve been trying to stay calm within lots of different challenges here. I think we mostly have done, trying to get things right on the pitch, trying to change the noise and putting a more positive feel about the club, not just the team.

“We are trying to do that and once we get there another thing comes up so it’s just one of those things.”

Everton come into the match having won three of their last five in all competitions despite a tricky start to the season which saw them wait six games for their first league win of the season.

Dyche always thought his side were playing well without getting the results they deserve but has recently seen his side convert performances into points.

He added: “Three out of four and then the game last week I think it’s fair to say was affected by a decision (not to send off Liverpool’s Ibrahima Konate). I think we all know that.

“That’s slightly an anomaly in such an important game but I’ve said all season the performance levels have generally been good, obviously there’s things to work on but lately they have been good.

“There is a good feel about the group, the energy, the commitment to the cause has been good. Some of the quality has been good so we have to continue to work and find a tune.”

West Ham started the season well but have had a slight dip in form, having not won in their last two league games before losing their first European game of the season in midweek to Olympiacos.

Despite those recent results, including a 4-1 thrashing from Aston Villa, Dyche is expecting the best of the East London side and thinks David Moyes’ teams are never easy to match up against.

He said of the ex-Toffees boss: “A lot of the things you usually get with his team, usually they are competitive.

“They work but they can play as well and try to find that balance between a team that can defend but can also attack, so of course his sides are always difficult to play against – certainly from my experience.”

David Moyes paid a warm tribute to “wonderful man” Bill Kenwright following the death of his former chairman at Everton.

Everton announced on Tuesday that Kenwright had died aged 78 following a battle with cancer.

Moyes and Kenwright formed a close bond during the Scot’s 11-year spell as manager at Goodison Park between 2002 and 2013.

“It’s incredibly sad news,” Moyes said at his pre-match press conference ahead of West Ham’s Europa League clash with Olympiacos.

“He was a wonderful man, he gave me a big opportunity in my career, taking me when I was a young manager in the lower leagues and gave me a job in the Premier League.

“Brilliantly supportive. I couldn’t have had a better chairman, as a young coach.

“When I look at modern football nowadays, how difficult it is for any young managers to make their way, Bill Kenwright was great to work with.

“We had great times over 11 years with him and we had some successful moments together. He’ll be sadly missed.”

On Wednesday morning current manager Sean Dyche and club captain Seamus Coleman laid flowers at the statue of Dixie Dean outside Goodison Park, where the Everton squad were holding a training session.

All players and staff observed a minute’s silence before the session and Kenwright’s image was shown on the stadium’s screens.

In a statement on the club website, Dyche said: “It’s a very sad time for everyone at Everton Football Club to lose our chairman, someone who has been such an amazing servant to the club in so many ways.

“His influence in bringing me to Everton in the first place was important and I have nothing but gratitude and respect for his unwavering support of myself, the staff and our players.

“It was a pleasure to share the moment of reaching our objective last season with him – a moment I know he felt so strongly about after such an arduous season, on and off the pitch…

“He was an incredible professional, in terms of what he did with Everton and also what he achieved in the theatre industry. Spending time with him and learning about his family, you couldn’t help but be taken by his passion.”

Dyche was told of the news midway through Tuesday’s training and called an immediate halt to the session as players and staff paid their respects.

Kenwright, who succeeded Sir Phillip Carter as chairman in 2004 after first joining the board at Goodison Park in 1989, had a cancerous tumour removed from his liver in August.

Liverpool-born Kenwright was a successful theatre and film producer when asked to join the Everton board in 1989.

He bought a majority 68 per cent stake in the club in 1999 and became deputy chairman before replacing Carter in his current role.

Dyche added: “Beyond his deep love of his family, one of those big passions, of course, was football – the game as a whole, as well as his obvious lasting love of Everton.

“His story – a boyhood supporter who went on to become chairman – is something so rare in the modern game, especially at the top level.

“He always believed in Everton and stood by the club, even in the toughest times. He was steadfast until the very end.

“Like so many who knew him, my heart and my thoughts are with his family at this extremely sad time.”

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp used his press conference ahead of Thursday’s Europa League clash against Toulouse to add his own tribute to Kenwright, adding to that issued by his club on Tuesday.

“The thing that I read recently, obviously, (he had) a massive heart for the city and a massive heart for Everton,” Klopp said.

“But the message he gave around the Hillsborough speech he held that time, I heard about: ‘They chose the wrong city and chose the wrong mums’. That’s a really strong message.

“With all of the rivalry with Everton, especially around the games, I don’t think we have any issues with each other left or right of games. This just shows how united we are in these moments, and that’s really big. He found the right words for it. My condolences to the family. I hope they are OK.”

The Premier League has recommended a deduction of up to 12 points for Everton over alleged breaches of financial rules, according to a report on Wednesday.

The Daily Telegraph has reported that the league has asked an independent commission hearing charges against the Merseyside club to impose a severe sanction.

A 12-point deduction would leave Everton on minus-five points in this season’s league table. The club and the Premier League have not commented on the report.

The league referred the club to the commission in March over an alleged breach of its profitability and sustainability (P&S) rules over a period ending with the 2021-22 season.

The league’s P&S rules allow clubs to lose a maximum of £105million over a three-year period or face sanctions.

Everton said in a statement issued on the day that news of the referral was confirmed: “The club strongly contests the allegation of non-compliance and together with its independent team of experts is entirely confident that it remains compliant with all financial rules and regulations.

“Everton is prepared to robustly defend its position to the commission. The club has, over several years, provided information to the Premier League in an open and transparent manner and has consciously chosen to act with the utmost good faith at all times.”

Everton have recorded annual losses for five consecutive years – more than £430million in total over the period.

The club are the subject of a takeover bid by American private investment firm 777 Partners, which last week denied a New York Times report that its bid had stalled because of a failure to supply information to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

The Premier League has recommended a deduction of up to 12 points for Everton over alleged breaches of financial rules, according to a report on Wednesday.

The Daily Telegraph has reported that the league has asked an independent commission hearing charges against the Merseyside club to impose a severe sanction.

A 12-point deduction would leave Everton on minus-five points in this season’s league table. The club and the Premier League have not commented on the report.

The league referred the club to the commission in March over an alleged breach of its profitability and sustainability (P&S) rules over a period ending with the 2021-22 season.

The league’s P&S rules allow clubs to lose a maximum of £105million over a three-year period or face sanctions.

Everton said in a statement issued on the day that news of the referral was confirmed: “The club strongly contests the allegation of non-compliance and together with its independent team of experts is entirely confident that it remains compliant with all financial rules and regulations.

“Everton is prepared to robustly defend its position to the commission. The club has, over several years, provided information to the Premier League in an open and transparent manner and has consciously chosen to act with the utmost good faith at all times.”

Everton have recorded annual losses for five consecutive years – more than £430million in total over the period.

The club are the subject of a takeover bid by American private investment firm 777 Partners, which last week denied a New York Times report that its bid had stalled because of a failure to supply information to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

Everton manager Sean Dyche has paid tribute to Bill Kenwright, who died on Monday at the age of 78, calling the late chairman “an amazing servant” to the club.

On Wednesday morning, Dyche and club captain Seamus Coleman laid flowers at the statue of Dixie Dean outside Goodison Park, where the Everton squad were holding a training session.

All players and staff observed a minute’s silence before the session and Kenwright’s image was shown on the stadium’s screens.

Everton announced on Tuesday that Kenwright had died following a battle with cancer.

In a statement on the club website, Dyche said: “His influence in bringing me to Everton in the first place was important and I have nothing but gratitude and respect for his unwavering support of myself, the staff and our players.

“It was a pleasure to share the moment of reaching our objective last season with him – a moment I know he felt so strongly about after such an arduous season, on and off the pitch…

“He was an incredible professional, in terms of what he did with Everton and also what he achieved in the theatre industry. Spending time with him and learning about his family, you couldn’t help but be taken by his passion.”

Dyche was told of the news midway through Tuesday’s training and called an immediate halt to the session as players and staff paid their respects.

Kenwright, who succeeded Sir Phillip Carter as chairman in 2004 after first joining the board at Goodison Park in 1989, had a cancerous tumour removed from his liver in August.

Liverpool-born Kenwright was a successful theatre and film producer when asked to join the Everton board in 1989.

He bought a majority 68 per cent stake in the club in 1999 and became deputy chairman before replacing Carter in his current role.

Dyche added: “Beyond his deep love of his family, one of those big passions, of course, was football – the game as a whole, as well as his obvious lasting love of Everton football club.

“His story – a boyhood supporter who went on to become chairman – is something so rare in the modern game, especially at the top level.

“He always believed in Everton and stood by the club, even in the toughest times. He was steadfast until the very end.

“Like so many who knew him, my heart and my thoughts are with his family at this extremely sad time.”

Everton boss Sean Dyche and captain Seamus Coleman have paid tribute to chairman Bill Kenwright.

The pair laid flowers at the Dixie Dean statue outside Goodison Park on Tuesday morning.

Kenwright died at the age of 78 following a battle with cancer, the club announced on Monday.

Kenwright, who succeeded Sir Phillip Carter as chairman in 2004 after first joining the board at Goodison Park in 1989, had a cancerous tumour removed from his liver in August.

Liverpool-born Kenwright was a successful theatre and film producer when asked to join the Everton board in 1989.

He bought a majority 68 per cent stake in the club in 1999 and became deputy chairman before replacing Carter in his current role.

Bill Kenwright would proudly regale anyone who cared to listen about his tales from the Boys’ Pen at Goodison Park, how he took two buses and a tram to watch his hero Dave Hickson, of eating soggy meat pies.

And, even though he graduated from the terraces to the boardroom, he never lost his love for the club. He was a chairman who remained a fan at heart.

It was, however, a stick used to beat him with when money became the driving force in football and the Toffees fell behind the Premier League’s big guns.

Nevertheless, his death at the age of 78 after suffering from cancer will be felt keenly by all associated with Everton.

Born on September 4, 1945 in Liverpool, the son of a bricklayer-turned-builder, his own journey was something considerably more dramatic – quite literally.

He took his inspiration from boyhood hero Hickson, saying: “I found a sort of guide – he taught me how to dare.

“From my family, I had real protection and comfort and, in mum, a spirit that said I could do anything I wanted to.”

His mother, Hope, who died in 2012 aged 93, remained a huge influence on his life and was famously dragged into Manchester United’s negotiations to sign young academy protege Wayne Rooney.

United’s then-manager Sir Alex Ferguson, recalling the talks in his autobiography, wrote: “Bill Kenwright gets on his phone and he hands it to me and says, ‘It’s my mother, she wants to talk to you’. She said: ‘Don’t you dare steal my boy!’.”

Theatre and acting was Kenwright’s second love and he was on stage at the Liverpool Playhouse by the age of 12, attending the Liverpool Institute high school at the same time as Paul McCartney and George Harrison and touring local pubs and clubs with his RnB band, The Chevrolets.

A romantic gamble got him his break as a professional actor as he arrived in Manchester to attend university but instead made a late decision to head to Granada Studios, where a successful walk-in audition set him on the path to becoming a theatre impresario and film producer via a role in Coronation Street as Gordon Clegg.

He went on to work with Tim Rice and Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber on Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat, Jesus Christ Superstar and Evita and produced the hit West End show Blood Brothers.

But Everton still pulled at his heartstrings and, after joining the board in 1989, he rose to deputy chairman when he launched a successful takeover with a £20m bid to buy a 68 per cent majority share of the club from Peter Johnson in 1999.

“I couldn’t think of anyone else who should be taking over the club apart from me,” Kenwright, who became chairman in 2004, said at the time of the takeover.

“More than anything else I’m a fan. I know more than most people what the guy on the terraces and in the directors’ box would want to see.”

With David Moyes at the helm for 11 years, Kenwright oversaw something of a resurgence, but the arrival of billionaire owners changed the face of football and he realised he could not compete as the criticism of his reign began to grow.

“A football club is a trophy asset and you buy a football club not to make money, believe me, I am living proof of that. There’s not huge money in the world,” he explained.

He eventually secured billionaire businessman Farhad Moshiri as major shareholder, a bitter-sweet moment as it meant relinquishing power for his beloved club to move forward.

Persuading Moshiri to install Sam Allardyce as manager after sacking Ronald Koeman was Kenwright’s final major, albeit unpopular, decision, but his role as chairman meant he continued to be a regular in the directors’ box at Goodison.

As the club’s fortunes failed to align with their new-found finances, supporter protests started to increase, with Kenwright facing accusations of overseeing two decades of underachievement and decay.

Despite his attempts to engage with fans, the relationship was never the same and in January he was, along with three directors, prevented from attending matches at Goodison because of fan opposition that entailed “threats to safety and security”.

Kenwright is survived by partner Jenny Seagrove and daughter Lucy Kenwright.

Everton chairman Bill Kenwright has died at the age of 78 following his battle with cancer, the club have announced.

Kenwright, who succeeded Sir Phillip Carter as chairman in 2004 after first joining the board at Goodison Park in 1989, had a cancerous tumour removed from his liver in August.

A statement on the club’s website said: “Everton Football Club is in mourning following the death of Chairman Bill Kenwright CBE, who passed away peacefully last night aged 78, surrounded by his family and loved ones…

“The club has lost a chairman, a leader, a friend, and an inspiration. The thoughts and prayers of everyone at Everton are with his partner Jenny Seagrove, his daughter Lucy Kenwright, grandchildren and everybody who knew and loved him.”

Everton announced earlier this month that the surgery had been “completely successful”, but complications meant Kenwright needed a lengthy stay in an intensive care unit before continuing his recovery at home.

Liverpool-born Kenwright was a successful theatre and film producer when asked to join the Everton board in 1989.

He bought a majority 68 per cent stake in the club in 1999 and became deputy chairman before replacing Carter in his current role.

In June this year, Everton owner Farhad Moshiri announced he had asked Kenwright to remain as chairman and help the club through a “period of transition”.

Kenwright had come under pressure from a section of fans who protested at how the club was being run.

It was announced last month that a deal to sell the club to American investment firm 777 Partners had been agreed.

The prospective new owners insisted last week that the takeover bid was still on track after it was reported they had failed to supply information to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and said the process was ongoing.

Ronald Koeman was sacked as Everton manager on this day six years ago after a poor start to the season.

The Toffees were third from bottom in the Premier League having won just two of their opening nine league games and the Dutchman paid the price.

Koeman had led the club to a seventh-placed finish the previous season in his only full campaign at Goodison Park, but a 5-2 defeat against Arsenal proved to be his final match in charge.

 

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A post shared by Ronald Koeman (@ronaldkoeman)

 

At the time of the decision, Everton had conceded 18 goals in nine games, with only Crystal Palace having a worse goal difference and with the team having collected just eight points.

A brief statement from the club read: “Chairman Bill Kenwright, the board of directors and major shareholder Farhad Moshiri would all like to express their gratitude to Ronald for the service he has given to the club over the past 16 months and for guiding the club to seventh place in last season’s Premier League campaign.”

Koeman took to social media following the announcement, saying: “I would like to place on record my thanks to the players and staff for all their work and commitment during my 16 months as Everton manager.

“I would like to thank (chairman) Bill Kenwright, (major shareholder) Farhad Moshiri and the Everton board for the opportunity to have managed a great club, and to the fans as well for their passionate support for the club.

“Naturally I am disappointed at this moment but I wish the team good luck in
the future.”

Under-23s boss David Unsworth was placed in temporary charge before Sam
Allardyce took over until the end of the season.

Koeman was appointed boss of the Netherlands in 2018 and then again earlier this year after a spell with Barcelona.

Liverpool captain Virgil van Dijk accepts they were lucky not to have Ibrahima Konate sent off in the 2-0 Merseyside derby win over 10-man Everton.

Mohamed Salah scored twice late in the second half after Ashley Young was dismissed for a second bookable offence just before the interval but the hosts were fortunate referee Craig Pawson did not deem the already-cautioned Konate’s tackle on substitute Beto to be worthy of another yellow.

Manager Jurgen Klopp’s decision to immediately substitute the France international to avoid a fifth red card of the campaign was almost an admission of guilt and Van Dijk believes they may have finally had some fortune with the officiating after a number of decisions going against them this season.

“Definitely. He (Pawson) could have given it, he didn’t give it. Bit of luck for us. So what can I say? Nothing else,” said the Netherlands captain, who has suffered personally already with a red card at Newcastle in August.

Liverpool managed to have Alexis MacAllister’s dismissal at home to Bournemouth overturned on appeal but have seen Diogo Jota and Curtis Jones sent off in the controversial defeat at Tottenham during which VAR officials made a huge error in disallowing Luis Diaz’s perfectly-good opening goal.

For a time it appeared the club were engaged in a running battle with Premier Game Match Officials Ltd over the incidents in that game, which has led to a lot of questions being asked about refereeing standards and some of the decisions being made generally.

In particular the threshold for yellow cards appears to be lower this term in relation to time-wasting and complaining.

Van Dijk said the players were trying to steer clear of allowing that to spill out onto the pitch.

During the win over Everton there were a couple of occasions, such as for Young’s second caution and during the wait for VAR to overturn Pawson’s decision not to award a handball against Michael Keane, when the Liverpool captain could be seen ushering his team-mates away from the official.

“I think tackles and stuff that’s for the referees to judge,” said the Dutchman.

“When there is a decision we wanted to stay away from the referee and to make sure we don’t get yellow cards for shouting or saying, ‘Ref, yellow for this’.

“That’s something we have influence on and something we should stay away from. We did that very well, especially with the circumstances.”

While Young’s dismissal made Everton’s task more difficult they were on the back foot for the entire match after their only shot on target came in the opening minute.

A solid defensive effort plus some poor execution in the final third kept the game goalless until Keane’s handball allowed Salah to score his 200th career league goal from the spot, adding his second from a rapid breakaway from Darwin Nunez deep into added time.

“It was the game we expected. The red card changed it a little bit but we had our game plan, we had to be very patient,” added Van Dijk.

“In these games when you score the 1-0 it changes the whole dynamic of the game.”

A fourth successive home win maintained Liverpool’s position in the top four and only a second Premier League clean sheet was another boost.

“Obviously we are still at the beginning of the season but there are very positive signs, very pleased we kept a clean sheet, won quite comfortably, didn’t give many chances away,” said Van Dijk.

“We shouldn’t panic anyways, we have the quality that whatever happens in the game, 1-0 down or in the last couple of minutes still 0-0, chasing for the winner, we have to be calm.

“That’s a sign of a great team because we have players that can make a difference.”

Sean Dyche described referee Craig Pawson’s decision not to send off Ibrahima Konate in the Merseyside derby as “nearly impossible”.

Everton were reduced to 10 men late in the first half at Anfield when Ashley Young was shown a second yellow card but Pawson opted not to make the same decision midway through the second half when Konate pulled back Beto.

The Toffees had succeeded in keeping the game goalless to that point but Mohamed Salah then scored a penalty after a VAR review saw Michael Keane penalised for handball and the striker added a very late second to give Liverpool a 2-0 win.

Dyche was booked following the Konate decision, and he said: “I have no clue. I have asked the referee and he said he didn’t feel it was a bookable offence and he felt that straight away. I don’t know what is then.

“I think people who were here today would be stunned it was not a second yellow. Their manager took him off as quick as he could, he’s realised. I don’t want to talk about referees. I can’t remember the last time I spoke this openly about referees and decisions but that one is incredible to me.

“And I got a yellow card. I don’t even know why I got a yellow card. It was a near impossibility. For literally gesticulating like everyone in the stadium was probably. That’s ridiculous.

“I would get in trouble so I’m not going to get too involved in it, I think I’m trying to be fair. How that’s not a second yellow is nearly impossible I think in the modern game.”

Dyche had no real complaints about the Young decision or the penalty, saying: “The sending off happens. I think the first one’s touch and go, the second yellow is a yellow. That’s the way it goes.

“The penalty, I don’t like the modern rule but I am aware of it. I don’t think it is a deliberate act but they’re the rules now, it’s going to get given.

“I must say I’m getting bored of all this running over to the TV. We all know what’s going to happen. They’re talking about speeding the game up, why not just get on with it? There is somebody in an office with 47 views. If it’s a penalty, it’s a penalty.”

Dyche called for VAR to be used for instances such as Konate’s that could lead to a sending off but does not believe Liverpool were given the rub of the green as a result of the high-profile officiating errors in their recent loss to Tottenham.

“I doubt it, I think referees just referee whatever’s going on in front of them,” he said. “I just think it was a bad decision. I think there were a lot of bad decisions, both ways. But that’s a vital decision in a game like this.”

Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp immediately substituted Konate and had sympathy with Dyche, although he insisted he did not see the incident clearly.

“I didn’t see it back, and I was not sure I saw it 100 per cent, I think I was somewhere else in that moment, but then when he’s going down, and Ibou I knew had a yellow card, I knew that could be tricky,” said the Reds boss.

“He didn’t get the second yellow then I thought we don’t give it a chance and take him off. I can imagine the frustration of Everton and Sean, absolutely.”

Nevertheless, Klopp believed his side fully merited the three points and praised Salah, who took his goal tally for the season to eight.

“What I love most about Mo is that Mo Salah played for us an incredible amount of fantastic games,” said the Reds boss.

“Today it was not his best game but being that clinical is probably his biggest quality and I love that, because you need somebody who brings the ball over the line.

“I couldn’t respect that fact more. That’s absolutely outstanding. The numbers are crazy. He will never stop, that is his nature and that’s really cool for us.”

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