Billy Vunipola has been left out of new head coach Steve Borthwick's 36-man England squad for the upcoming Six Nations, though Owen Farrell will be kept on as captain.

Other notable omissions alongside Vunipola are Jonny May and Jack Nowell, with a combined 180 England Test appearances between the three players.

Dan Cole is included, having received the most recent of his 95 caps in the 2019 Rugby World Cup final defeat to South Africa, while Northampton Saints fly-half Fin Smith is among the five uncapped players Borthwick has picked.

The other potential debutants are London Irish's Ollie Hassell-Collins and Gloucester hooker George McGuigan, as well as Harlequins duo Cadan Murley and Jack Walker.

Farrell and Marcus Smith were also named, with the former set to remain captain having occupied the role under previous head coach Eddie Jones.

England's first game with their new boss will be against Scotland in the Six Nations at Twickenham on February 4, though they likely already have one eye on the 2023 Rugby World Cup, which begins in September.

Borthwick said: "This is an exciting squad, with a blend of Six Nations experience and young talent, and includes players who are in excellent form in the Premiership.

"We are all looking forward to the challenges of the Six Nations and we will approach this great tournament with a spirit of courage and total commitment.

"I know the players can't wait to get back to Twickenham and give our fans a performance they can be proud of.

"The hard work for the Scotland game starts now."

England squad: Forwards: Ollie Chessum, Dan Cole, Ben Curry, Alex Dombrandt, Ben Earl, Ellis Genge, Jamie George, Joe Heyes, Jonny Hill, Nick Isiekwe, Maro Itoje, Courtney Lawes, Lewis Ludlam, George McGuigan, Bevan Rodd, Sam Simmonds, Kyle Sinckler, Mako Vunipola, Jack Walker, Jack Willis.

Backs: Elliot Daly, Owen Farrell (captain), Tommy Freeman, Ollie Hassell-Collins, Dan Kelly, Max Malins, Joe Marchant, Alex Mitchell, Cadan Murley, Henry Slade, Fin Smith, Marcus Smith, Freddie Steward, Manu Tuilagi, Jack van Poortvliet, Ben Youngs.

Eddie Jones has made a sensational return to rugby as head coach of Australia after Dave Rennie was sacked.

Dismissed as England boss in December, with Steve Borthwick brought in as his replacement ahead of the Rugby World Cup this year, Jones has taken the Wallabies job for a second time. 

Australia ditched Dave Rennie to create the vacancy, with Jones describing his return to the job he previously held from 2001 to 2005 as "a wonderful opportunity".

Rugby Australia said Jones has committed until 2027, meaning his contract covers two World Cups and the 2025 British and Irish Lions tour.

The 62-year-old, who was in charge of the Australia side that lost to England in the 2003 World Cup final, will formally start his second tenure on January 29.

Jones said: "It is a wonderful opportunity for me to be able to come home to Australia and lead my nation to a Rugby World Cup.

"It is going to be an immense period for Australian Rugby – as a proud Australian, it is a great honour to be able to come home and lead the national team during these years.

"The Wallabies squad is a really talented group of players with good depth – if we can have everyone fit and healthy going into the World Cup this year, I am confident that we can go to France and break the 24-year drought of winning the Rugby World Cup.

"I am really looking forward to getting back home and getting stuck in."

Defeats in November to France, Ireland and particularly Italy sealed Rennie's fate. His team also beat Wales and Scotland on their Northern Hemisphere tour, but those victories were not enough to save his job. 

New Zealander Rennie had three years as head coach, and Rugby Australia said there had been "positive steps" taken under his leadership.

It was decided, however, that with Jones available for hire, Australia could not afford to stand by and see someone else move for him.

Rugby Australia chairman Hamish McLennan described the appointment as "a major coup", labelling Jones, who has also coached Japan, as "the best coach in the world".

"Eddie's deep understanding of our rugby system and knowledge of our player group and pathways will lift the team to the next level," McLennan said.

"Eddie instinctively understands the Australian way of playing rugby – this represents an opportunity to secure a coach of immense expertise and experience at the biggest competitions, and we did not want to miss it."

Jones will also oversee the development of Australia's women's programme, with the Wallaroos looking to build on a quarter-final appearance at last year's World Cup.

Jude Bellingham has got over the disappointment of England's World Cup quarter-final defeat to France but still wonders what might have been.

The 19-year-old midfielder had an impressive tournament in Qatar before England's 2-1 defeat at the hands of the eventual runners-up, with Three Lions captain Harry Kane both scoring and missing a penalty.

Ahead of his return to domestic action with Borussia Dortmund, Bellingham spoke to the Bundesliga club's media and opened up on his feelings following the World Cup.

"You come to terms with it pretty quickly, to be honest, but I still think about the game at times," he said. "There was an instance in training where I had a shot and I thought: 'That was just like the one that I had in the France game', and if I put it more to the left, would we have gone through?

"I was involved in the first penalty where I flicked it to Bukayo [Saka], and the second one, when I put the pass behind to Mason [Mount] and I always think: 'What if I'd just put it on Mason's toe and he went and scored?' And then there would have been no second penalty.

"You overthink things, but I think you come to terms with it quickly because you can't change it, whether you like it or not. Then you're on the plane home and think: 'We gave everything.'

"We had a tournament that the country can be proud of. We put up a really strong fight against one of the best teams in the world. We went out narrowly and you learn to kind of use it as ammunition for the next ones, and I think that's how I've taken it."

Despite ultimate disappointment at the last-eight stage, Bellingham was pleased with his first World Cup experience, which helped secure his inclusion in the 14-man shortlist for 2022's The Best FIFA Men's Player award.

"I think it was really good. I was really proud of it," he added.

"But you can't be satisfied because you go with the intention of winning it, and I really did feel like we had the chance to, especially after we got through against Senegal [in the last 16] and you realise there's only three more games. Had we beaten France and gone through, who knows what can happen?

"I personally enjoyed the kind of pressure of the games and the responsibility that the manager [Gareth Southgate] gave me... I think you create the pressure yourself through lack of preparation and confidence.

"Luckily, I don't lack confidence and I always try and stay prepared. I'm always quite confident that I can achieve the things I want to achieve."

Dortmund's season does not resume until January 22, over a month after the World Cup ended, and Bellingham is grateful for the rest.

"After the World Cup I was just drained physically, and I said to myself: 'I want to have a nice long rest'," he said. "But then about two weeks into it, I thought: 'Nah, nah, I need to go back in and get to work and finally be back,' and I can't wait to get going again."

Lionel Messi and Kylian Mbappe are among the leading candidates for The Best FIFA Men's Player award after unsurprisingly being named on the 14-strong list of nominees on Thursday.

FIFA's awards ceremony will take place on February 27 and recognise the sport's high achievers from 2022 across several categories, with The Best FIFA Men's Player prize being the headline attraction.

Messi, who won the 2019 award and came a close second to Robert Lewandowski for 2021, will be the firm favourite after inspiring Argentina to World Cup success.

It was the Albiceleste's first such title since 1986, and Messi played a crucial role in the triumph as Argentina beat France on penalties after a 3-3 draw last month.

Messi scored five goals and set up another three to win himself the Golden Ball, and he nearly took home the Golden Boot as well.

Of course, his Paris Saint-Germain team-mate Kylian Mbappe won the latter prize thanks to his hat-trick against Argentina in the dramatic final, and he will likely be Messi's closest rival.

Had it not been a World Cup year, Manchester City's Erling Haaland might have fancied his chances of staking a claim after a sensational start to life in the Premier League.

Ballon d'Or winner Karim Benzema is among the nominees and may be expecting a top-three finish after carrying Real Madrid to another Champions League crown, though his lack of World Cup involvement could prove detrimental.

Madrid boss Carlo Ancelotti is in the running for The Best FIFA Men's Coach gong, though Argentina's Lionel Scaloni will likely be the favourite of the five-man shortlist.

Argentina are also represented in The Best FIFA Men's Goalkeeper category by Emiliano Martinez among the five nominees.

For the women's prizes, Euro 2022 champions England have several nominations.

Beth Mead, Keira Walsh and Leah Williamson are all up for the players' award; Sarina Wiegman will be the favourite for the coaches' accolade; and Mary Earps is in contention to be named The Best FIFA Women's Goalkeeper.

The voting process will involve international captains and coaches, journalists, and fans selecting their winners in the various categories.

Voting closes on February 3 and FIFA will announce three finalists from each section thereafter.

NOMINATIONS

The Best FIFA Men's Player
Julian Alvarez (Argentina/River Plate/Manchester City)
Jude Bellingham (England/Borussia Dortmund) 
Karim Benzema (France/Real Madrid) 
Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium/Manchester City)
Erling Haaland (Norway/ Borussia Dortmund/Manchester City)
Achraf Hakimi (Morocco/Paris Saint-Germain) 
Robert Lewandowski (Poland/Bayern Munich/Barcelona)
Sadio Mane (Senegal/Liverpool/Bayern Munich)
Kylian Mbappe (France/Paris Saint-Germain)
Lionel Messi (Argentina/Paris Saint-Germain)
Luka Modric (Croatia/Real Madrid)
Neymar (Brazil/Paris Saint-Germain)
Mohamed Salah (Egypt/Liverpool) 
Vinicius Junior (Brazil/Real Madrid)

The Best FIFA Men's Coach
Carlo Ancelotti (Italy/Real Madrid)
Didier Deschamps (France/French National Team)
Pep Guardiola (Spain/Manchester City) 
Walid Regragui (Morocco/Wydad AC/Moroccan National Team)
Lionel Scaloni (Argentina/Argentinian National Team) 

The Best FIFA Men's Goalkeeper
Alisson Becker (Brazil/Liverpool) 
Yassine Bounou (Morocco/Sevilla)
Thibaut Courtois (Belgium/Real Madrid)
Ederson (Brazil/Manchester City)
Emiliano Martinez (Argentina/Aston Villa) 

The Best FIFA Women's Player: 
Aitana Bonmatí (Spain/Barcelona)
Debinha (Brazil/North Carolina Courage)
Jessie Fleming (Canada/Chelsea)
Ada Hegerberg (Norway/Lyon)
Sam Kerr (Australia/Chelsea)
Beth Mead (England/Arsenal)
Vivianne Miedema (Netherlands/Arsenal)
Alex Morgan (United States/Orlando Pride/San Diego Wave)
Lena Oberdorf (Germany/Wolfsburg)
Alexandra Popp (Germany/Wolfsburg)
Alexia Putellas (Spain/Barcelona)
Wendie Renard (France/Lyon)
Keira Walsh (England/Manchester City/Barcelona)
Leah Williamson (England/Arsenal)

The Best FIFA Women's Coach
Sonia Bompastor (France/Lyon) 
Emma Hayes (England/Chelsea)
Bev Priestman (England/Canadian National Team)
Pia Sundhage (Sweden/Brazilian National Team)
Martina Voss-Tecklenburg (Germany/German National Team)
Sarina Wiegman (Netherlands / English National Team)

The Best FIFA Women's Goalkeeper
Ann-Katrin Berger (Germany/Chelsea Women)
Mary Earps (England/Manchester United) 
Christiane Endler (Chile/Lyon)
Merle Frohms (Germany/Eintracht Frankfurt /Wolfsburg)
Alyssa Naeher (United States/Chicago Red Stars)
Sandra Panos Garca-Villamil (Spain/Barcelona)

West Indies fast bowler Kemar Roach will be returning to Surrey for the first six games of the LV=Insurance County Championship season.

Roach, 34, is returning to the club for a third season after successful spells in 2021 and in the title-winning 2022 season.

In his time at Surrey so far, he has taken 47 wickets at 23.57, including best figures of 8 for 40 against Hampshire in 2021.

Twenty-five of Roach's wickets came in seven matches in last year's Championship triumph, including a second-innings five-for against Warwickshire at the Kia Oval in July, to set up a six-wicket victory.

Roach - who last year became the sixth West Indian to reach 250 Test wickets - will join up with the squad ahead of Surrey's first fixture, away at Emirates Old Trafford against Lancashire, and his first game back at The Oval will be against Hampshire (13-16 April).

Roach will then be available for the trips to Edgbaston and Chelmsford before finishing his spell with two home derbies against Middlesex (11-14 May) and Kent (18-21 May).

"I really enjoy playing for Surrey and winning the title last year was incredible to be a part of," Roach said.

"It's such a talented and exciting group of players and I can't wait to get back out on the pitch representing the club."

Gareth Batty, Head Coach at Surrey, added: "We're looking forward to welcoming Kemar back to Surrey. He brings great ability and work ethic, and his experience plays an important role in the dressing room.

"Kemar has already shown what he can do in his time at the club so far and we're excited to have him joining us again this year."

 

Owen Farrell is set to play in England's Six Nations opener against Scotland despite a ban for dangerous tackling.

The England captain was cited after making contact with Jack Clement's head with his shoulder in Friday's Premiership match between Saracens and Gloucester.

Farrell believed the incident did not merit a red card, prompting a disciplinary hearing on Tuesday.

A four-match ban was upheld, however, potentially ruling Farrell out until after Sarries' clash with Leicester Tigers on February 19. England play both Scotland and Italy before that date.

But the final match of the suspension will be removed if Farrell completes the World Rugby Coaching Intervention Programme, which he has indicated he intends to.

An initial six-match ban was reduced after Farrell acknowledged the charge and showed "exemplary" behaviour during the hearing process.

It could not be reduced further at the outset due to a previous five-match suspension in 2020 for a high tackle on Wasps' Charlie Atkinson.

England hooker Luke Cowan-Dickie could miss the Six Nations after suffering an ankle injury.

The 29-year-old will definitely be sidelined when the Red Rose start the tournament against Scotland at Twickenham on February 4.

Cowan-Dickie sustained the injury during the second half of Exeter Chiefs' win against Northampton Saints on Saturday after scoring two tries.

Exeter director of rugby Rob Baxter told BBC Radio Devon on Tuesday: "Luke's injury looks relatively serious.

"He's seeing a surgeon today; that will maybe give us a more definitive outcome and timing."

Baxter is optimistic British and Irish Lion Baxter can still play a big part for the Chiefs before joining Montpellier at the end of the season.

He added: "It does look like an operation is going to be required but that said, at this stage, it wouldn't be a season-ending situation.

"We could still see him back for a good chunk of the season if rehab and everything goes well."

 

New Zealand bowler Trent Boult is unlikely to be involved against England next month, with coach Gary Stead effectively ruling him out of their Test series.

The paceman turned down his central contract in August but has still appeared for the Black Caps in white-ball cricket since.

Boult is set to spend the start of 2023 in franchise cricket, with the fast bowler set to depart the Big Bash League for a stint in the inaugural ILT20 League in the United Arab Emirates.

With the competition scheduled to end only four days before New Zealand host Ben Stokes' side at Mount Maunganui for the first of two Tests, Stead does not see Boult playing a part.

"No, I wouldn't have thought so," he said. "Trent and I have had discussions.

"I think his return from the UAE would only be a day or two immediately prior. I think from a workload perspective that's out of the picture."

Stead offered a promising update on Kyle Jamieson, who has not played competitive cricket since a back injury sustained against England in June last year.

He is set to appear in the Super Smash over the next week, though the Stead could make no promises about his inclusion in the wider red-ball picture.

"We'll make a decision a little bit closer to the time around the England series, whether that is maybe a step too far, or whether it is the right time for him to play again," he said.

"He's been out of cricket for a long time now and I think it would be silly to push too quickly and set him back again with the long-term plan of what's ahead of us."

Eddie Jones believes Steve Borthwick is well-equipped to succeed him as England coach.

A difficult 2022 bookended by Six Nations frustrations and a dismal November international period saw Jones let go less than a year before the World Cup.

Borthwick, who was an assistant to Jones with Japan and then England, has since taken the reins with his own number two Kevin Sinfield.

Reflecting on the appointment of his former colleague, the 62-year-old was effusive in his praise, adding that he takes pride in having helped to shape his path to the top job.

"Steve Borthwick was there [from 2016] until 2020," he told The Guardian. "He then wanted his own career.

"One of my jobs was to get England to win again, which I did, and also to produce the next head coach.

"So I look back with satisfaction because Steve will do a bloody good job. He's outstanding."

Jones, a famously outspoken figure within the game, departed last year after a tough period suggested his chances of repeating 2019's run to the World Cup final was a tall order.

The former Australia coach acknowledged he made errors, adding: "I don't have any regrets, but there were a couple of mistakes, a couple of decisions I probably rushed."

Asked whether his decision to criticise England's reliance on the public school system for players was such a call, Jones agreed in that assessment, though he defended his stance.

"That was one of my mistakes," he added. "Once you get that group offside you're in trouble. But diversity is so important and sport's not sheltered from that."

England Test captain Ben Stokes believes the quality of international cricket has been damaged by the sport's packed schedule.

Stokes, who led his country to a historic 3-0 series win over Pakistan last week, retired from one-day internationals earlier this year, stating it was "unsustainable" for him to play in all three formats of the game.

And the 31-year-old thinks the intense schedule needs to be addressed to give players the best chance of performing at their highest level. 

"It really has an impact on the multi-format players and people who want to play all three forms," he told the Today programme on BBC Radio Four.

"Obviously you want international cricket to be at the highest standard whenever you possibly can but over the last few years I think you've seen a lot of different squads being picked, a lot of different players coming in, coming out, being rested.

"And I don't think that's the way for international cricket to go. The scheduling and everything like that I think just doesn't get as much attention given to it as it should."

Stokes took a six-month break from the sport last year to prioritise his mental health – a decision he looks back on with pride.

"I felt I needed to obviously take a break, and I felt I needed some help to get me back to where I am today, and to get me back on the field from after I took the break," he added.

"I didn't ever really have an issue with coming out and expressing my feelings and opening up about it, because obviously I went into detail a lot in my documentary that I did about my break and how I was feeling, and the steps I took to get me back to a certain place.

"Out of all of that I can't tell you how much pride that I felt in myself in doing that, and some of the messages I received from people I don't know who have never met me.

"But that's why I took huge pride out of it, putting myself in the public eye, and that it's actually really helped a lot of people.

"I feel as if men in particular, because that's where the stigma is, the more men that can do it, great, because I feel if you do, you're going to help a lot more people around the world who are in a similar situation to you."

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp is hopeful Jude Bellingham will not come under too much pressure following his "absolutely exceptional" showing for England at the World Cup.

The Borussia Dortmund midfielder has been strongly linked with a move to a number of Europe's elite clubs – Liverpool among them – on the back of another impressive year.

Bellingham started all five of England's matches at Qatar 2022, which ended in quarter-final defeat to France, scoring and assisting one goal from central midfield.

He was reportedly valued in excess of €100million (£88.5m) by Dortmund prior to the World Cup, a valuation that is likely to have only risen since.

However, Klopp says that no matter how expensive the 19-year-old is, he should not be weighed down by growing expectations in his home country.

"I don't like to talk always about money," Klopp told reporters. "When you talk about a player like Jude, I think everybody agrees he's just exceptional for the age group. 

"Imagine somebody has no clue about football or whatever or knows about football but didn't watch it for a while and has no clue on Jude Bellingham...  

"'How old do you think he is?' I think nobody would get it. Or even get close to his age. It's like 28, 29, whatever, these kind of things, because he plays that maturely. 

"He played an exceptional World Cup, absolutely exceptional. And he's so good in so many things and has to improve and other things.

"But to describe him I'd say the things he can do already are difficult to learn. The things he has to improve are easy to learn and to improve so that makes a really good player. 

"What can I say? I don’t say anything new. I thought that already, since two or three years ago, since he had his breakthrough at Dortmund, everybody knows that already.

"But I have no idea what that means for the money side of it. I really think if we all if want to do him a favour, then we just don't talk too much about money. 

"And I mean, from an English point of view, don't throw any hurdles in his development. That would be really cool, wherever he will end up."

Bellingham (19 years, 145 days) is the third-youngest player to start for England at a World Cup after Michael Owen in 1998 (18y, 198d) and Luke Shaw in 2014 (18y, 347d).

The Birmingham City academy product became the second-youngest player to score for England in the competition behind only Owen with his goal against Iran.

 

The teenage midfielder will remain in high demand ahead of the January transfer window, which Liverpool will target as a chance to strengthen their squad.

Liverpool are sixth in the Premier League and face a challenge to qualify for the Champions League, which Klopp accepts that could impact what players his side try to sign.

"It's very important, very important," he said of finishing in the top four. "That's obviously our main target. I'm surprised that you don't ask me today 'can you be champions?' 

"I think we have a good chance to qualify for the Champions League. If it will happen this year, I don't know. But we're 100 per cent one of the contenders for the next few years. 

"If you ask a player and he's like, 'yeah, but next year you're not sure if you're in the Champions League; I'd prefer to go to a club who play in it now, but maybe not next year'. 

"I'm not sure I would want this player still to be honest. So it's like I understand it 100 per cent. I want to be part of the Champions League, to be honest, all the time.

"For now, we have pathways still to qualify for the Champions League next year. As long as that's the case, I see ourselves as a proper contender for qualification."

Joe Root believes his decision to step down as England Test captain has been justified following a remarkable end to 2022 for Ben Stokes' red-ball side.

England became the first visiting team to win three matches in a Test series in Pakistan this week, taking them to nine victories from 10 Tests since Stokes replaced Root as skipper in April.

Prior to Root's decision to step down, England suffered a demoralising 1-0 series loss to West Indies and were thrashed 4-0 by Australia in the Ashes. 

With England now earning plaudits for their fearless style under coach Brendon McCullum and captain Stokes, Root has no regrets concerning the end of his time at the helm.

"We weren't performing," Root recalled in an interview with Sky Sports. "We weren't delivering what I thought we were capable of, and it had a massive impact on me away from cricket as well.

"If you can't even be yourself, then you aren't able to give what that role requires, lead in the right way or lead a group of players.

"For a number of reasons, it was the right thing to do, to step back. It needs someone to throw absolutely everything at it.

"As soon as I made that decision, it was quite clear that it was the right one, and I've not looked back. I gave everything to that role and threw everything at it. I am really proud of the way I went about that."

England's aggressive approach was on display as they posted their fifth-highest innings total in history (657) in their Pakistan opener, and Root feels the team's enjoyment of their new style has paid dividends.

"Brendon's got a very aggressive approach to how to play the game, I think Ben is even more aggressive! It is exciting," Root said.

"When you are 10, 12, or even younger, you're playing in the back garden – that's the feeling that you get – that raw enjoyment of smacking the ball, bowling fast, or spinning it miles. That's something you should never really lose as a player.

"It's easy to forget, in the hype of the pressurised environments and demands of constantly putting in performances and winning. But it is so important that you enjoy what you do, and you're more likely to get the best out of yourselves and it's something that we've paid quite a lot of attention to."

England will attempt to reclaim the Ashes on home soil in 2023, with the series set to begin at Edgbaston on June 16, and Root is enthusiastic about their prospects.

"Everything ramps up. The interest around Test cricket in this country goes up a notch," Root said of playing in a home Ashes series.

"It's a great opportunity for us, and with how we played our cricket under Ben last summer, it's a very exciting place to be with a big series like that coming around.

"We've proven to ourselves we can do it against two of the best teams in the world in our own conditions, so it will be great to take Australia on and take that one step further again."

Sam Curran was "absolutely overwhelmed and incredibly humbled" to become the most expensive player in IPL history.

The England all-rounder, fresh from a standout white-ball performance at the T20 World Cup that saw him named Player of the Tournament, is returning to Punjab Kings for 2023.

Curran was the subject of a record bid from Punjab, eventually selling for an all-time high 18.5 crore (£1.85million) in Friday's auction.

"I'm absolutely overwhelmed and incredibly humbled to receive that bid," he told Star Sports. "Punjab is where I did my debut season a few years ago.

"I feel confident going into this tournament. We had a fantastic World Cup. I'm incredibly excited to come to India for this big opportunity.

"There's so many things running through my mind. I knew this morning about the auction, but I was struggling to find a stream. It wasn't on TV.

"I saw the bids coming from Mumbai, then Chennai. Having played for Chennai earlier, it was cool to see them, [and then] I got a call about joining Punjab."

Stuart Broad is back in the England fold after making the squad for February's Test tour to New Zealand, as teenager Rehan Ahmed sits out the series.

Veteran bowler Broad, who is England's second-highest wicket-taker in international red-ball cricket after James Anderson, missed this month's 3-0 series success against Pakistan following the birth of his first child.

The 36-year-old Nottinghamshire seamer is one of three players who return to the squad, along with Durham's Matthew Potts and Essex's Dan Lawrence.

Ahmed, who became England's youngest men's Test player when he debuted in the third and final match against Pakistan in Karachi, is omitted as part of a wider management plan for his progression.

The 18-year-old will instead head to the UAE T20 League in the new year, with a view to him possibly earning white-ball international honours during March's tour of Bangladesh.

Paceman Mark Wood is rested after a busy few months in which he has been one of just two England players to feature in both white-ball and red-ball series against Pakistan, as well as the T20 World Cup in Australia. Harry Brook was the other to have featured throughout in England's squads, but the batter retains his place for the two-match New Zealand trip.

England Test squad: Ben Stokes (captain), James Anderson, Stuart Broad, Harry Brook, Zak Crawley, Ben Duckett, Ben Foakes, Will Jacks, Dan Lawrence, Jack Leach, Ollie Pope, Matthew Potts, Ollie Robinson, Joe Root, Olly Stone.

Argentina's World Cup triumph has moved them up to second in FIFA's world rankings, but Lionel Messi's Golden Ball-winning exploits were not enough for top spot.

La Albiceleste defeated France on penalties in a thrilling final that ended 3-3 after extra time at Qatar 2022, ending their 36-year wait for the sport's biggest prize.

But despite it proving fifth time lucky for talisman Messi, it is Argentina's closest rivals Brazil who top the world rankings at the end of the year.

The Selecao were knocked out in the quarter-finals following a penalty shoot-out loss to Croatia, but Tite's side hold on to their place at the summit.

It ends a run of four consecutive years when Belgium have ended the calendar year as the world's top-ranked nation in men's international football, with the Red Devils dropping to fourth.

Their descent allows France to move a place up the ladder, to sit third behind Argentina, while England round out the top five in an unchanged position.

A shock loss to Morocco sees Spain slip down the list to 10th, with the African nation in 11th, while Croatia enjoy a major bump to go seventh at Denmark's expense.

Indeed, Denmark suffer one of the biggest drops, down to 18th, with the Netherlands, Italy and Portugal rounding out the rest of the upper echelons.

Other countries enduring slides down the rankings after poor World Cups include Germany, Uruguay and Wales, but there are boosts for Japan, Australia and Cameroon after impressive performances.

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