Trinidad and Tobago’s Jereem Richards uncorked a punishing run to successfully defend the men’s 200m title, with a new Games record, at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games on Saturday.

In one of the best performances of his career, Richards ate up the track, and his opponents, to finish near five metres clear in a new personal best of 19.80.

Heading into the final, the talk surrounded a rematch between Richards and British sprinter Zharnel Hughes who finished ahead of the Trinidadian at the last edition of the Games but was disqualified for impeding him, after the athletes’ arms came together.

This time around, there could be no such complaints as the Richards blasted through the first half of the race, came off the curve first, and powered away from the field.  Hughes was second in a season-best 20.12, with Ghana’s Joseph Paul Amoah finishing third in 20.49.

With the victory, Richards became the third athlete to successfully defend the 200m title at the event, behind Jamaican Donald Quarrie and Namibia's Frankie Fredricks.  

Janieve Russell successfully defended her title and Shiann Salmon took silver but a hoped-for clean sweep of the Women’s 400m Hurdles did not materialize at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games on Saturday.

It was South Africa’s Zeney van der Walt who played the role of a party crasher, unfurling a gritty, brilliant late run to deny the third Jamaican measured for the podium, Rushell Clayton, a place on the platform. 

Clayton had looked a lock for the medals early on, even leading the race at the top of the bend, just ahead of Russell.  Even after Russell surged past the three Jamaicans were well clear of the field with five metres to go but nobody saw van der Walt.  Clayton tied up badly just metres from the line and the South African surged past, her late run taking her almost into second spot. 

The Australian finished in 54.47 a new personal best and the same time as Salmon.  Russell finished well clear with 54.14 and Clayton further back in 54.67.

Jamaica’s Sunshine Girls registered a historic 67 – 51 win over New Zealand to advance to the netball final of the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England on Saturday.

The result followed up another big win for the team, after getting by world number one-ranked team Australia in Pool A.  The Jamaicans are now scheduled for a rematch with the Australians in the final.  The Australians defeated England 60-51 in the day’s other semi-final.

Against New Zealand, Jamaica captain Jhaniele Fowler had a perfect 54 goals from 54 attempts to lead her team.  The Jamaicans got off to a strong against the world number two ranked team and ended the first quarter with an 18-9 lead.  It was an advantage they never really surrendered, despite a strong fourth-quarter rally from the Kiwis.  New Zealand were led by Grace Nweke who netted 24 goals from 24 attempts.

New Zealand will face off with England in the bronze medal match, which will also take place on Sunday.  The appearance will be the first in the Commonwealth Games final for the Sunshine Girls, having previously won three bronze medals.

Jamaica’s women’s 4x100m relay team put on a dazzling performance to smash the U20 world record at the World Athletics U-20 Championships in Cali, Colombia on Friday.

The quartet of Serena Cole, Tia Clayton, Kerrica Hill, and under-20 100m world champion Tina Clayton took apart the field to stop the clock at 42.59.  The mark improved on the previous record of 42.94, which was also set by a Jamaican quartet at the World Athletics Under-20 Championships in Nairobi, Kenya last August.

The mark was also just outside of the 42.58 clocking set at the Carifta Games earlier this year, by Cole, Tina and Tia Clayton as well as Brianna Lyston, which was eventually rejected by World Athletics because one of the members of the team, Tina Clayton, was not drug tested at the completion of the race, due to a procedural issue. 

The United States were a distant second in the event but also set a new national record after clocking 43.28.  The USA was represented by Jayla Jamison, Autumn Wilson, Iyana Gray, and Shawnti Jackson.  The home team quartet of Maria Alejandra, Marlet Ospino, Melany Bolaño and Laura Martínez took bronze in 44.59.

In the men's equivalent the Jamaican quartet of Bouwahjgie Nkrumie, Bryan Levell, Mark-Anthony Daley, and Adrian Kerr crossed the line in third position behind South Africa and Japan but were upgraded to silver following the disqualification of South Africa.

Jamaica’s Briana Lyston continued the country’s dominance of the women’s sprint events after claiming the 200m title at the World Athletics U20 Championships, in Cali, Colombia on Friday.

After heading into the final as a heavy favourite, the inclement weather did very little to slow the young Jamaican speedster as she pulled away from the field to take the title with a time of 22.65.

America’s Jayla Jamison chased the Jamaican to the line, to finish second in 22.77, a new personal best.  Another Jamaican Alana Reid also clocked a personal best of 22.95 to take the bronze medal.

The Jamaicans also managed to add to their tally in the field, as high jumper Brandon Pottinger held his nerve to take the gold medal with a leap of 2.14m. Following a break in the competition due to a steady downpour,  the Jamaican was the only athlete of six to clear the height.  Brian Raats of South Africa and Bulgaria’s Bozhidar Sarâboyukov shared the silver medal with a mark of 2.10m.

World Athletics U-20 Championships 100m silver medalist Serena Cole admits she still prefers the long jump event despite an outstanding performance in the final on Wednesday.

A fast-finishing Cole powered home to come in behind compatriot and high school teammate Tia Clayton, who stopped the clock in a championship record of 10.95.  Cole finished a respectable 11.14 for second spot.

The athlete is, however, also a strong competitor in the long jump event and in fact, claimed the title at the Caribbean’s Carifta Games earlier this year.  Despite not competing in the event at the U-20 World Championships due to a scheduling conflict, she has no intention of giving it up.

“It (Long Jump) was going to be right in the time of the 100m so my coach said I shouldn’t do it this year,” Cole explained.

“Last year I was supposed to be in the 100m but had some difficulties in my season, so I didn’t get a chance but I came out and did my best this year and I am so proud of my performance,” she added.

Heading back to high school in September, however, the athlete will return to her preferred long jump event with a view to balancing it with the sprints.

“Right now, my pet event is the long jump.  I really prefer the long jump to the 100m.  Going back to training, I know coach Jeremy will have a lot of programs for me to do with the long jump and the same with coach Dyke.  So, I just have to put everything into the programs and train really hard.”

Cole has a personal best of 6.36m in the long jump.

Jamaica Sunshine Girls head coach Connie Francis has credited the team’s commitment to patience as a crucial component in a historic win over Australia at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games on Thursday.

The Jamaicans registered a 57-55 win in the Pool A encounter, a result that marked the first time the Sunshine Girls were registering a win over the number one ranked team at the Commonwealth Games.

The Sunshine Girls staged a furious fourth-quarter rally after trailing Australia 46-40 at the end of the third.  According to Francis, a key part of that success had to do with taking better care of the ball.

“We went back to the basics, pushed it around, looked for short and long passes, something that we are not accustomed to but we have implemented for this tournament,” Francis said.

“We decided we were going to be very patient and not make silly passes, only one silly turnover was on the side and I thought we should not have gone there because we had other players that could have taken the ball,” she added.

“At that stage in the later part of the game when we surged forward, they were determined to keep the lead because that is what we have been practicing and that is what they wanted.  They wanted this victory more than anything else.”

The team’s highest finish at the Commonwealth Games is third, which they have achieved on three separate occasions.

Jamaica's Danniel Thomas-Dodd failed to successfully defend her Commonwealth Shot-Put title but captured a hard-earned silver medal in Birmingham on Wednesday.

After an event-leading 18.98, registered in the third round, Thomas-Dodd seemed set to successfully defend her title.  It was not to be, however, as Canadian Sarah Mitton registered a massive 19.03 to take the lead in the sixth and final round.

With one throw to go, Thomas-Dodd could not find a response.  Maddison-Lee Wesche of New Zealand was third in 18.84.  Another Jamaican in the field, Lloydricria Cameron, finished just outside the medals in 17.62.

Jamaica's reigning double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah added the Commonwealth 100m title to her list of accomplishments after winning the event in comfortable fashion in Birmingham on Wednesday.

The Jamaican headed into the final as a heavy favorite and easily lived up to that billing after dominating the event to cross the line in 10.95.  St Lucia’s Julian Alfred continued an excellent season after finishing second to the Jamaican in 11.01.  Great Britain’s Daryl Neita was third in 11.07.  The Bahamas' Tynia Gaither and Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte were 7th and 8th respectively.

The medal was the third for the athlete at the event, but her first individual medal, adding to 4x100m relay gold and silver medals in 2014 and 2018 respectively.

In the men’s equivalent, Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala claimed top billing after winning the event in 10.01, ahead of South Africa’s Akani Simbine, the defending champion, who was second in 10.13.  Sri Lanka’s Yupun Abeykoon was third in 10.14.  No Caribbean male athlete made the 100m final.  Jamaica’s Kemar Bailey-Cole, who won the event in 2014 finished fourth in the semi-finals.

 

Jamaica’s Under-15 continued to struggle at the 2022 Concacaf Girls’ Under-15 Championship in Tampa, Florida after suffering a heavy 11-0 loss at the hands of the United States on Tuesday.

The young Reggae Girlz opened the tournament in Group B with a 5-0 loss to Canada.  Where Nikolina Istocki led the way with a pair of goals for the Canadians.

Things would get a good deal worse for Jamaica as the rampant United States, the competition’s defending champion handed them an 11-0 loss.   Abby Ballek scored four goals, while Alexandra Pfeiffer bagged a brace to lead the way for the North Americans.

The United States began the competition with a 12-0 win over Puerto Rico.  The Jamaicans will face Puerto Rico in the final group match on Thursday.

 

Jamaica’s Ebony Drysdale Daley won the country’s first Commonwealth Games medal in the sport of Judo after claiming silver in Birmingham on Tuesday.

Competing in the women’s 70 kg category, Daley was outpointed by Australia’s Aoife Coughlan.  The Australian was the aggressor from the outset as opposed to the Jamaican who took a more passive approach to the final.

The approach did not pay dividends, however, as Coughlan was handed the win, a golden score in the extra period when a third shido penalty was issued to Daley.

The British-based Drysdale Daley made history by being the first athlete to represent the country at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.  The medal was the first for Jamaica at the event.

A shot-filled half-century from Kyle Mayers was not enough to prevent a 7-wicket loss for the West Indies as India, pushed on by an equally forceful reply from Suryakumar Yadav, won the third T20 international with an over to spare.

After losing the toss and being put in to bat, Mayers and Brandon King got the team off to a solid start, in the power play, after a 57 partnership for the first wicket.  Although by taking 20 deliveries to make his 20, King somewhat slowed down the scoring rate.   

 Hardik Pandya got the breakthrough for India when King, deceived by a slower ball, dragged onto the stumps.  Mayers then joined forces with captain Nicholas Pooran for another 50 partnership pushing the team to 107.  Pooran was then undone by a delivery from Bhuvneshwar Kumar, which he miscued before being gobbled up by Pant.  The Windies captain used 23 balls for his 22 runs.

The same pair, Kumar, and Pant, combined to finally account for Mayers, as well, as he top-edged to Pant from a slower ball.  Rovman Powell and Shimron Hetmyer made brief cameos of 23 and 20, and briefly accelerated the scoring but were kept in check by India’s bowling line-up.

In pursuit, India got off to a flyer despite Rohit Sharma retiring hurt in the second over and Shreyas Iyer struggling after coming in next at the crease.  The innings was fueled by Yadav’s aggression with his 76 runs off 44 balls putting the match out of reach for the West Indies. India now leads the five-match series 2-1 after three games.

Bahamian 400m world champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo is looking forward to the challenge of competing regularly in the 200m after officially hanging up her spikes for the 400m event.

Having added the World Championship title to two Olympic gold medals, at the Oregon World Champions last week, the 28-year-old sprinter has expressed a desire to break new ground.  As such, Miller-Uibo has targeted trying her luck full-time over half the distance.

These days, however, the half-lap event is not for the faint of heart.  Three of the fastest times in the event’s history have been recorded in the last year.  Two Jamaicans, Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah, and world champion Shericka Jackson have the world record in their sights. It's a competitive field.

Despite the fierce competition, however, the Bahamian is confident about making her mark.

 “The plans for me are the 200 which has always been my first love and get back into that,” Miller-Uibo said.

“I have run 21.7 without proper training. Once we go at it, I think we can do better,” she added. 

“They’re setting the stage pretty high.  I’m so proud of the girls and I think that they’re really showing out right now and showing the world exactly what we can do. I can’t wait.”

The athlete will have her first test next Saturday when she faces Jackson in Poland.

West Indies captain Nicholas Pooran believes the team must be better at managing the game’s big moments following a 68-run loss to India in the first of five T20 internationals on Friday.

Despite switching formats, the Caribbean team failed to snap its losing streak against India after skipper Rohit Sharma's quickfire 64, from 44 deliveries, laid the platform for India to post a challenging 190.  The team was also boosted by an unbeaten 41 off just 19 balls from Dinesh Karthik.

In pursuit of the target, the Windies failed to put any significant partnerships together and the highest individual total of 20 came from Shamarh Brooks.

Their struggles were in large part due to the efforts of India’s spin trio of Ravindra Jadeja, Ravichandran Ashwin, and Ravi Bishnoi who combined to stifle the Windies at the crease.   In total, the trio picked up five wickets.

“We are going to have games like this where we are going to just get shut out. The batsmen did get starts but we didn’t capitalize on those starts.  We didn’t win the big moments today and it’s as simple as that,” Pooran said following the game.

The team also made changes to its typical batting order, with all-rounder Jason Holder promoted to three.  He was, however, dismissed without scoring by Ravindra Jadeja.

“It was good for us to come out here and experiment a bit.  The guys did show up but we need to hold our nerve in big moments, especially when the pressure is on, we need to embrace it,” he added.

 

Jamaica distance runner Adelle Tracey will not be able to compete at the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games due to red tape surrounding her recent switch of allegiance.

Tracey competed for the Caribbean Island at the recently concluded IAAF World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, after switching international allegiance from Great Britain on June 26th.

The athlete competed in both the 1500m and 800m, for Jamaica, in Oregon, where she clocked a personal best of 1:59.20 in the 800m heats and narrowly missed out on a spot in the final. Tracey had been selected again for the Jamaica team but will not be able to take her place this time around because of different protocols governing the Commonwealth Games.

“It’s a real shame, I was very much looking forward to that atmosphere,” Tracey told BBC Sport.

“I was getting emails telling me to download the app for the athletes’ village, I had been selected by Jamaica, they had forwarded my information, but I am not on the start list,” she added.

“We have chased endlessly and made sure that everyone had the right information, it was just a case of, for the Games, it was a different protocol.”

The 29-year-old athlete was born in the United States to a Jamaican mother and British father.

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