Anthony Joshua says he would welcome Tyson Fury's offer to help him train for his rematch with Oleksandr Usyk next spring.

Fury recently told Fox Sports Australia that Joshua would "definitely" beat Usyk with his assistance, going so far as to guarantee a win. 

Speaking with IFL TV, Joshua invited his longtime rival to come to his camp and even get in the ring with him, as long as he was willing to work for free. 

"He's more than welcome to come through the door," Joshua said. "He can even spar with me as well. I need a coach that's lived it, breathed it, so it would be perfect. That'd be the easiest way to get him in the ring."

The two British heavyweights have yet to square off after their agreement on a two-fight deal last summer fell by the wayside after both were obligated to fight different opponents first. 

While Fury completed his trilogy against Deontay Wilder with a win earlier this month, Joshua was upset by Usyk in September, prompting a rematch against the Ukrainian in 2022. 

Joshua's banter around Fury's offer had a tongue-in-cheek quality to it, but he did strike a nostalgic note in looking back on the sport's glory days. 

"I see pictures with Sugar Ray Robinson, Joe Louis, Rocky Marciano, Archie Moore, Muhammad Ali all sitting together," Joshua said. "They'll be in each other's training camps. ... Mate, come into my training camp. Come and see what the heavyweight champion gets up to. It's great. 

"Heavyweight boxing is thriving. So for me, Tyson can come and watch me train, 100 per cent. Sparring ain't fighting, is it? Do you know what I mean?

"So he can definitely come in, he's more than welcome to step into the gym and give me some tips. I ain't fighting him next anyway, so he ain't got nothing to worry about."

Shakur Stevenson felt compelled to apologise to his fans after a mediocre fight his last time out, but he had no reason for shame Saturday. 

Stevenson jumped on Jamel Herring from the opening round and did not let up, winning the WBO junior lightweight title with a 10th-round TKO in Atlanta. 

The 24-year-old Stevenson (17-0) punished Herring (23-3) all night, leaving his 35-year-old opponent shaken by the middle of the scheduled 12-round bout. 

The 2016 Olympic silver medallist ensured this one would not go the distance, with referee Mark Nelson stopping the fight at 1:30 of the 10th round shortly after having the ring-side doctor examine the bleeding Herring. 

It was a dominant all-around performance for Stevenson, and a welcome one on the heels of his unanimous-decision victory over Jeremiah Nakathila in June. 

The Las Vegas crowd showered both men with boos near the end of that tepid contest, which was marked by a lack of action from either fighter. 

After taking down Herring, Stevenson referenced the criticism he received from ESPN announcers in June. 

"I wanted a fun fight and I wanted to perform," he said. "I wanted to show my skill, my boxing skill, my defence and my power. I thought I showed everything tonight."

Dillian Whyte has been forced to cancel his heavyweight clash with Otto Wallin on October 30 due to a shoulder injury, promoter Eddie Hearn confirmed on Wednesday.

The fight with Sweden's Wallin, set to take place at the O2 Arena in London, was the main event on an impressive card with Whyte set to return to action for the first time since beating Alexander Povetkin in March.

However, a shoulder injury sustained in training has forced the postponement of the fight and it remains unclear whether the clash will be rescheduled.

The winner was in line to face the undefeated Tyson Fury for the WBC heavyweight crown in 2022, though Whyte's next bout may still be against the 'Gyspy King' should the meeting with Wallin be called off completely.

The WBC had ruled that the winner of Fury and Deontay Wilder's trilogy fight would have 30 days to agree on a bout with IBF, WBA and WBO champion Oleksandr Usyk, or face the reigning interim champion - the winner of Whyte versus Wallin.

However, Anthony Joshua has triggered a rematch clause to ensure he fights Usyk again in 2022, opening the door for Whyte or Wallin to step up.

Should Whyte be required to challenge Wallin in a rearranged clash, defeat will once again throw a spanner in the works for the Briton, despite him currently ranking as the WBC's interim challenger.

Whyte has encountered similar problems before while waiting for a world title shot, having been knocked out by Povetkin in 2020 before recovering in the rematch between the pair.

Anthony Joshua is visiting various trainers across the United States as he looks to potentially alter his coaching set-up ahead of his rematch with Oleksandr Uysk.

Joshua's tactics were scrutinised after he lost his IBF, WBA and WBO belts to the undefeated Uysk, who collected a unanimous decision at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium on September 25.

The two-time former unified world heavyweight champion must now triumph in his rematch, likely in March 2022, to reclaim his belts after the second defeat of his professional career.

Trainer Robert McCracken, who was criticised for allowing Joshua to attempt to outbox Usyk, has worked with the 2012 Olympic champion for the entirety of his professional career but the 32-year-old has been pictured working in gyms across the USA as he scouts for a potential new trainer.

Virgil Hunter, Eddy Reynoso and most recently Ronnie Shields - who worked with both Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield – have all been seen with Joshua and the latter trainer confirmed the rumours the Briton was in the market for a new appointment.

"They reached out to me and they asked if I would be interested in taking a look at AJ and that he wanted to come down to Texas and see if things would work out between him and I," Shields told ThaBoxingVoice.

"I said, 'No problem, I would love to see if we had a connection together'.

"He said, 'European boxing is different from boxing in the US'. He realised he had to come to the US to get something different.

"He told me, 'Listen, I know people don't think I'm a dog. I've got to be a dog in this next fight'.

"And that's his words. He told me, 'I just need you to show me how to be the best dog you can teach me to be.'"

American boxer Jermall Charlo trains with Shields and posted several videos on Instagram of Joshua speaking with Tyson's former coach after undertaking a light training session.

Joshua has provided no official confirmation on his coaching staff yet, with assistant trainers Angel Hernandez and Joby Clayton also part of his set-up.

After losing to Andy Ruiz Jr, Joshua added Hernandez to his team but it remains unseen as to whether he will continue with McCracken as his trainer for the Usyk rematch.

 

Deontay Wilder has congratulated Tyson Fury for winning their trilogy fight, having declined to do so in the immediate aftermath of the bout in Las Vegas.

The WBC champion defended his belt and maintained his unbeaten record (31-0-1) with a devastating 11th-round knockout of Wilder (42-2-1) in a classic slugfest.

The American left the ring soon after the fight was over and, according to Fury, refused to show any respect before departing.

"I'm a sportsman; I went over to show some love and respect and he didn't want to show it back," Fury said. "I'll pray for him so God will soften his heart."

"I said, 'Well done'. And he said, 'I don't wanna show any sportsmanship or respect.' I said, 'No problem'."

"Very surprised [by] that," Fury added. "Sore loser, an idiot. Do you know what? To be a top fighting man, you've got to show guts and respect and he couldn't do it tonight. And that's it."

However, Wilder appears to have had a change of heart, using a post on his official Instagram account to congratulate his opponent after an epic trilogy came to an end.

"Wow, what a hell of a night! I would like to first and foremost thank God for allowing me to give the world another part of me that's driven with passion and determination," Wilder wrote.

"I would like to thank my team and my fans for sticking by my side through this long process. I would be lying if I said that I wasn't disappointed in the outcome but after reflecting on my journey, I now see that what God wanted me to experience is far greater than what I expected to happen.

"We didn't get the win but a wise man once said the victories are within the lessons. I've learned that sometimes you have to lose to win. Although, I wanted the win I enjoyed seeing the fans win even more.

"Hopefully, I proved that I am a true Warrior and a true King in this sport. Hopefully, WE proved that no matter how hard you get hit with trials and tribulations you can always pick yourself up to live and fight again for what you believe in.

"Last but not least I would like to congratulate [Tyson Fury] for his victory and thank you for the great historical memories that will last forever."

Deontay Wilder will not quit boxing despite losing against Tyson Fury for a second time, says the heavyweight's lead trainer Malik Scott.

Wilder was knocked out in the 11th round by Fury in a slugfest between the pair for the WBC world championship on Saturday in Las Vegas.

The 35-year-old American challenger did manage to drop the unbeaten British star twice in the fourth, but the fight was stopped in the penultimate round after Fury landed a series of brutal strikes to end Wilder's resistance.

It was the third meeting between the heavyweight rivals, following a contentious split-decision draw in the first clash in December 2018 and then Fury's dominant victory to end Wilder's unbeaten record in February 2020.

But despite losing the trilogy fight, trainer Scott assured Wilder would not hang up his boxing gloves yet.

"Deontay [Wilder] has set his family financially secure, so he doesn't have to fight to make a living," Scott told iFL TV.

"But retiring is not in his plans at all and not something we've discussed.

"He will be back in any form he wants to be. He's a big-time fighter, and he doesn't belong down there with the other guys, he needs to be in high-level fights and main events.

"Deontay Wilder was great on Saturday, but Tyson Fury was even greater – it was a great night of boxing for the heavyweight division.

"You have to give Fury credit for having a good chin and getting up. Fury is a legend and one of the best in the heavyweight division in any era, and it's the same about Deontay."

Scott was appointed by Wilder following the second bout with the 'Gypsy King' after his then-trainer Mark Breland threw the towel into the ring for a seventh-round stoppage.

But while the two boxers exchanged several knockdowns at the T-Mobile Arena in the final contest, Scott insisted there was never a moment he considered waving the white flag for Wilder.

"Over the years of me knowing Deontay, he has always said throwing the towel in with a knockout artist like him wouldn't be tolerated," he said.

"It's something I respected. The last knockdown was the worst knockdown and the ref called it off.

"Deontay and Mark [Breland] never had a relationship outside the gym, they never talked for more than five minutes on a phone call. 

"Me and Deontay would never fall out and not speak again – our bond is too tight."

Tyson Fury insisted his "saga" with Deontay Wilder is "done for good" after his stoppage win in Las Vegas, a result that has earned the undefeated WBC champion a well-earned break.

In the third meeting of the heavyweight rivals, Fury dropped his opponent in the third but was then down himself twice in the next round, the tables suddenly turned as the pair went toe to toe.

However, the Briton came on strong in the second half of the contest. After scoring a further knockdown in the previous round, he finished the job in the 11th thanks to a chopping right hand that finally ended Wilder's brave resistance.

"It was a great fight. Rarely do we see heavyweight trilogies. I think the last one was Riddick Bowe and Evander Holyfield, and those fights didn't disappoint," Fury said at his post-fight media duties.

"The saga with Wilder is done now. Done for good. It was definitely a historic trilogy, for sure.

"It swung both ways and both fighters had the opportunity to seize the moment, it was just that I showed the initiative, dug deeper and wanted it more.

"At the end of the day, when it comes down to that sort of fight, it's about who is willing to push further. I wasn't willing for it to go to the scorecards; I was definitely trying for a knockout.

"Wilder is a very tough guy and he's got heart, heart to keep going. He took a lot of punishment, and that puts a lot of mileage on the clock. So did I, I took a lot of punishment as well, some good shots, got put over but then got back up.

"It was just a great fight, all in all. You have to take your hat off to Wilder and his team: he put up a good fight. That's what I'm here for, I wasn't here to blow someone over in one round.

 "I've travelled the world for so many years to find challenges – he gave me a real worthy challenge tonight."

With another meeting with Wilder seemingly unlikely, Fury could instead target Oleksandr Usyk, the holder of the IBF, WBA and WBO titles after his shock triumph over Anthony Joshua, who has triggered a clause for a rematch with the Ukrainian.

For Fury, however, the immediate focus is celebrating his latest success.

When asked about a potential fight with Usyk, Fury replied: "We will see. I've just earned a well-earned break.

"I've been away from my family for six months in total. I've been home for two weeks in the last six months, so before I start thinking about fighting other men, I'm going to bask in this victory.

"This was one of my greatest wins. I got off the floor to do it. I'm the big dog in the division, probably one of the heaviest heavyweight champions in history: 277 pounds. I was fit, I was strong in there and felt good.

"We will just see what today and tomorrow brings."

On his plans, he added: "I'm going to go out, have a couple of drinks and relax.

"I'm not even thinking about boxing, I'm going to go out and bask in this glory. Last time, after the second fight, I just went back, went to bed, got up the next day and flew home. This has been a well-deserved victory, and I'm just going to enjoy it."

Tyson Fury labelled himself "the greatest heavyweight of my era" after the WBC champion defended his belt with a devastating knockout of Deontay Wilder.

Fury (31-0-1) stayed undefeated thanks to his 11th-round KO against Wilder in Saturday's blockbuster trilogy in Las Vegas.

In an all-time epic bout, Fury was dropped twice but the British star got the better of Wilder (42-2-1), who showed incredible courage to make it to the penultimate round having appeared out on his feet.

After the slugfest, Fury said: "Like the great John Wayne said, I'm made of pig iron and steel, baby!

"I took some big shots but my lord and saviour helped me up and kept me going. It was a great fight tonight and it's worthy of any trilogy in the history of the sport."

"I was down a couple of times, I was hurt, Wilder is a strong puncher," said Fury, who landed some thunderous blows to the head of the American.

"It was a great fight. I will not make any excuses, Wilder is a top fighter, he gave me a run for my money. I always say I am the best fighter in the world and he is the second best.

"Don't ever doubt me. When the chips are down I can always deliver."

Fury added: "I'm now the greatest heavyweight of my era, without a doubt. Number one, numero uno. Look what I've done.

"I've came to America my last six fights and fought the most devastating puncher in the history of our sport. Not once, not twice, but three times. Danger, danger man."

After a contentious split-decision draw in the first meeting back in December 2018, the rematch saw Fury take the judges out of the equation with a dominant performance, forcing a seventh-round stoppage that not only saw Wilder lose the WBC title but also his unbeaten record as a professional.

The pair put on an instant classic on Saturday but Wilder appeared unwilling to pay respect to Fury as he swiftly left the ring post-fight.

"I'm a sportsman; I went over to show some love and respect and he didn't want to show it back," Fury said. "I'll pray for him so God will soften his heart."

"I said, 'Well done'. And he said, 'I don't wanna show any sportsmanship or respect.' I said, 'No problem'."

"Very surprised [by] that," Fury continued. "Sore loser, an idiot. Do you know what? To be a top fighting man, you've got to show guts and respect and he couldn't do it tonight. And that's it."

Tyson Fury won a battle of the ages against Deontay Wilder, retaining his WBC heavyweight championship with a devastating knockout in the pair's blockbuster trilogy bout.

In a brutal slugfest in Las Vegas, unbeaten British star Fury dropped American challenger Wilder in the 11th round to successfully defend his belt on Saturday.

Fury (31-0-1) and Wilder (42-2-1) went toe-to-toe throughout the heavyweight showdown, though the latter was out on his feet and it appeared a matter of time before the 'Gypsy King' scored the telling blow.

After a contentious split-decision draw in the first meeting back in December 2018, the rematch saw Fury take the judges out of the equation with a dominant performance, forcing a seventh-round stoppage that not only saw Wilder lose the WBC title but also his unbeaten record as a professional.

The trilogy was not seemingly on the cards — or at least not this soon — until the outcome of an arbitration hearing, a judge ruling the reigning champion was contractually obliged to face his former foe again, ending the possibility of a unification showdown with Anthony Joshua.

In front of a star-studded crowd, Wilder made a bright start, though Fury moved around well and managed to land a strike to the head in an exchange before the end of the opening round.

Both men continued to go for some big shots as the referee repeatedly shouted to keep it clean, with clinching aplenty.

Fury scored a knockdown in the third round after sending Wilder to the canvas with a big shot to the head and the latter – on the ropes amid a flurry of big punches – barely made it to the bell.

Wilder appeared to seize the momentum in an incredible fourth round, with the slugfest moving in his favour having dropped Fury twice in a concerning sequence for the champion.

Neither fighter took a backward step in a stunning showdown between two powerful hitters – Fury landed a blow to Wilder's head late in the sixth round and continued where he left off in the seventh.

Wilder, who spent most of the fight on the ropes, looked out on his feet during the latter stages of the seventh after absorbing another brutal strike to the head as Fury sniffed blood.

Having somehow survived, Wilder was floored in the 10th and was on the receiving end of an uppercut during the final stages and while he ended the round swinging, he was finally stopped in the 11th.

Anthony Joshua triggered a rematch clause against Oleksandr Usyk for the heavyweight championship, promoter Eddie Hearn confirmed.

Joshua was dethroned by Usyk, who was crowned WBA, WBO and IBF champion after a unanimous points decision victory at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in London on September 25.

Now 24-2, having also suffered a shock defeat to Andy Ruiz Jr. in 2019 before winning their rematch, Joshua is set to step into the ring again with Usyk next year.

"Joshua is training now, and today we officially triggered the rematch for the Oleksandr Usyk fight, which we will see early next spring," Hearn told DAZN.

"So back in the game and looking for him to become a three-time heavyweight champion."

Joshua had been tipped for a long-awaited duel with Tyson Fury next year before his upset at the hands of Ukrainian opponent Usyk.

Fury is due to face Deontay Wilder in Las Vegas on Saturday as they conclude a contentious trilogy – the former won the second bout following a draw.

"As I said, I'll fight Tyson Fury, Wilder, without the belts. The belts are fun. It's great, it's legacy. But with or without the belts, I'll fight whoever," Joshua said after his loss to Usyk.

"The road to undisputed is a nice title to have and a nice title to chase.

"But would you still watch it, without the belts? That's the main thing – is you've got two competitive fighters in the ring from UK soil, that just want to go toe-to-toe."

Tyson Fury has vowed to "obliterate" Deontay Wilder when he puts his WBC world heavyweight title on the line in Saturday's trilogy fight at the T-Mobile Arena.

The 33-year-old looked in tremendous condition at Friday's weigh-in as he tipped the scales at 277 pounds — four pounds heavier than he was in his most recent meeting with Wilder 20 months ago.

Wilder is also at a career-high weight of 238, an increase of seven pounds, but Fury does not believe he will have any problems stopping his American opponent for a second time in a row.

Asked what the advantage is of coming in heavier this time around, Fury said: "It means total obliteration of a dosser! Total annihilation. That is what it means to me.

"Two-hunded-and-seventy-seven pounds... I am going to put him in the royal infirmary after the fight."

The 39-pound difference between the two is the closest across their three fights. 

"I wanted to look tasty and feel sexy," Wilder said of his physique. "I am bench pressing over 350 so I will be able to lift him. We just wanted to have fun in camp, we had a great time. The say you practice for perfect, we practiced for permanent.

"Calmness is the key to the storm. I know when I am not calm my mind is cloudy, when my mind is cloudy it allows you to make bad decisions. 

"When you are calm you are able to make great decisions. I have rejuvenated myself, redemption is upon us and I can't wait to show the world what I am all about." 

This will be the third chapter in a heavyweight rivalry that has produced plenty of drama in the past, both in and out of the ring.

After a contentious split-decision draw in the first meeting back in December 2018, the rematch saw Fury take the judges out of the equation with a dominant performance, forcing a seventh-round stoppage that not only saw Wilder lose the WBC title but also his unbeaten record as a pro.

The trilogy was not seemingly on the cards — or at least not this soon — until the outcome of an arbitration hearing, a judge ruling the reigning champion was contractually obliged to face his former foe again, ending the possibility of a unification showdown with Anthony Joshua.

Fury contracting COVID-19 led to a further delay, scuppering an original July fight date, but, finally, the stage is set in Las Vegas for the pair to meet again.

For Wilder, this is an opportunity to rebuild his reputation. He hopes a new man in his corner can help: Malik Scott once lost to his fellow American in the ring, now he is tasked with formulating a plan to get his old foe back on top.

Scott has certainly talked the talk in the build-up, even predicting his fighter gets the job done inside five rounds after working hard to refine his game.

"He got content with knocking people out with one weapon, which was the right hand," Scott said. 

"What I did was I went to his toolbox and pulled everything out that he does well. Deontay Wilder can do it all. I just pulled a lot of stuff out of him in training camp. I made sure we drilled him with intent."

The development of Wilder, a power hitter whose boxing skills have always been questioned, is just one of the intriguing plot lines going into a contest that should make for absorbing viewing, whatever the final outcome.

 

TALE OF THE TAPE

TYSON FURY

Age: 33
Height: 6ft 9ins (206cm)
Weight: 277lbs
Reach: 85ins
Professional record: 30-0-1 (21 KOs)
Major career titles: IBF, WBA, WBC, WBO heavyweight

DEONTAY WILDER

Age: 35
Height: 6ft 7ins (201cm)
Weight: 238lbs
Reach: 83ins 
Professional record: 42-1-1 (41 KOs)
Major career titles: WBC heavyweight

After a positive COVID-19 test led to a delay, Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder will finally fight for a third time on Saturday.

Their initial meeting, way back in December 2018, was an epic, a drama-filled 12 rounds followed by a controversial twist with the verdict. While the action delighted all who had watched on, the split-decision draw satisfied no one.

If there were questions asked from that first bout, Fury provided emphatic answers in the rematch just under 15 months later.

Wilder not only lost his WBC title but also his unbeaten record, blitzed by a foe who made sure the scorecards were not required again.

So, what can we expect when the duo battle again in the ring? Before the first bell, look back at the story of the rivalry so far…

Early Christmas present a long time in the making

Fury and Wilder had seemed on a collision course well before their first clash, which was staged in Los Angeles. Indeed, the former had called out the American not long after beating Wladimir Klitschko in 2015, getting into the ring to declare 'The 'Bronze Bomber' a "bum" after watching his rival defeat Artur Szpilka by stoppage.

They were again both inside the ropes when Fury defeated Francesco Pianeta in Belfast in August 2018, his second fight since returning to action. With a December 1 date finally booked, there was a press tour that took in three cities and saw plenty of words exchanged: they even had to be separated at the final news conference before the fighting started early.

Once they did get down to business, Wilder – coming in at his lightest weight since his pro debut – struggled to get to grips with the size of the task at hand against the bigger Fury, though he eventually caught up with him to score a knockdown in the ninth round.

If that moment was eye-catching, when he dropped him again in the 12th and final round, it appeared to have emphatically ended the contest.

However, Fury somehow recovered in time, climbing up off his back to beat the count. Having managed to make it through to hear the final bell, the challenger then listened on as the scores were read out: 115-111 Wilder, 114-112 Fury, 113-113 draw. Both felt they had done enough to get the verdict in the aftermath, yet the result just left everyone wanting more.

Eventually, we got it…

'Unfinished Business' delivers emphatic outcome

Both fighters added two more wins to their career records to remain unbeaten for the long-awaited rematch in February 2020. Fury actually managed three, if you count a brief foray into the world of wrestling.

When it came to the day job, the Briton opted to work with SugarHill Steward for the rematch. The switch in trainer led to a change in tactics, too.

Coming in considerably heavier than the first meeting, Fury wasted little time in taking control. His relentless attacks put Wilder down in the third round, then again in an eventful fifth that saw the aggressor deducted a point for holding.

During the seventh, co-trainer Mark Breland had seen enough, throwing in the towel to spare Wilder further punishment. The decision, however, was heavily criticised by the beaten fighter: "I just wish my corner would have let me go out on my shield - I'm a warrior and that's what I do."

Wilder also pointed to an elaborate ring-walk costume, made in honour of Black History Month, having an impact on performance, the 40-pound suit and matching headgear leaving him with "no legs" from the outset. His words carried little weight, however, and it appeared both men would move in opposite directions to continue their careers.

Changing times, but will it change the result?

Malik Scott is the new trainer in Wilder's team, the former opponent now charged with the task of working on a plan for the challenger to topple Fury and reclaim the WBC title.

It needed an arbitration hearing to make this third fight happen, though. Fury appeared set to take on Anthony Joshua in a lucrative showdown to find a new undisputed champion, only for a judge to rule he was still contracted to face his old foe instead.

The trilogy was originally booked for July 24, only for Fury to test positive for coronavirus in the build-up. A new October date was confirmed, but in the meantime Joshua lost his grip on the IBF, WBA and WBO belts, dethroned by Oleksandr Usyk.

A clash with the unbeaten Ukrainian could be in store for whoever wins at the T-Mobile Arena on Saturday, but such talk can wait for the aftermath.

For now, the only focus for both Fury and Wilder is making sure they come out on top in the latest chapter of this rivalry, one that has seen far more words exchanged than actual punches.

Considering all that has happened beforehand, it should not be taken for granted that it is the last episode, either.

Tyson Fury insisted Deontay Wilder's "legacy is in bits" as he vowed to knock out his American opponent in Saturday's trilogy fight.

Wilder suffered a technical knockout defeat to Fury almost 20 months ago at MGM Grand after their drama-filled first fight in December 2018 ended with a split-decision draw.

The pair face off again at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas this weekend as unbeaten Fury makes the first defence of his WBC world heavyweight title.

And Fury continued to goad his rival, who made a string of excuses for the defeat last time out – the first of his professional career – at Wednesday's final news conference.

"You're in denial and you're going to get knocked out and retire," Fury said.

"Your legacy is in bits. All the excuses, you've been destroyed. No one has believed you. They're all laughing at you like a weak piece of s***.

"You're a weak man, you're getting knocked out."

Wilder has remained largely quiet in the build-up to the high-profile bout but he eventually rose to the taunts, insisting Fury is not capable of knocking him out on Saturday.

"You don't know nothing about knocking anyone out. You don't have knockout power. You're not a knockout artist."

Responding to Wilder's "legacy" claims, Wilder said: "When you know the truth, they say the truth will set you free. 

"I have no pressure, there is nothing to lose, everything to gain.

"All the pressure is on him. Your legacy only dies when the man dies, when the desire and fire in your heart dies, when that dies so does your legacy, and I am well alive.

"We have got a lot of things in line, in order, this is what the world needs to know, there is a lot of things I could put out there, but silence is golden."

Both men were set for a traditional stare down after exchanging words, but promoter Bob Arum called it off and the boxers left the stage in opposite directions.

"At the end, we were going to do a face-off and Wilder ran away! Welcome to my world, b****," Fury later told iFL TV.

Anthony Joshua made the "worst decision ever" when he tried to outbox Oleksandr Usyk, his manager Eddie Hearn admits.

Undefeated Usyk was crowned WBA, WBO and IBF heavyweight champion after a unanimous points decision victory over Joshua at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium on September 25.

Joshua must now win a rematch, expected to be held in March 2022, to reclaim his belts, as he has done previously after suffering a shock defeat to Andy Ruiz in 2019.

Hearn insists Joshua will have a different approach next time after acknowledging his fighter and coach Rob McCracken got it all wrong in the first bout against former cruiserweight king Usyk.

He told talkSPORT: "Usyk is another level of boxing intelligence to anyone, so what is the last thing you do? Box him! And try to outbox him, try and be more intelligent than him. 

"For some reason, AJ had it in his head that he could outbox him, maybe out of stubbornness or maybe a little bit of ignorance as well.

"Worst decision ever. The only way you're going to beat Usyk is to use your size, use your attributes.

"AJ is one of the most devastating punchers out there; great combination punching, speed, everything. You’ve got to back him up, you’ve got to beat him up.

"But these are all the things that maybe he knew he had to do, but he thought he could outbox Usyk, which is a disastrous strategy quite frankly."

Joshua will come into the rematch heavier in order to utilise his size and power advantage.

Hearn added: "In the rematch, there is no secrets. He's going to fight exactly the opposite; he's going to come in heavier, he's going to try to bulldoze him, beat him up.

"Usyk was saying after the fight, 'I was hurt a few times in the fight', and he was. From nothing.

"When AJ gets hold of him, it will be a different story. But, it's like [fighting] Tyson Fury, you've got to get hold of him.

"AJ has got to be ruthless, not completely reckless, but he was outboxed. 

"He is not going to outbox Usyk. This is what has got to be drummed into him in camp, he loves watching these old fighters and the sweet science. Forget it.

"If the AJ that boxed Wladimir Klitschko boxed Usyk the other night, I believe he wins. So he has got to back to that devastating style which made him what he is.

"He has improved so much as a boxer, but right now, that is the last thing we need."

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