ATP Finals: Sinner shines on unexpected Turin debut

By Sports Desk November 16, 2021

Jannik Sinner capitalised on an unexpected ATP Finals opportunity by beating Hubert Hurkacz in straight sets on his debut.

Matteo Berrettini's withdrawal due to injury meant Sinner stepped in as a late replacement for his fellow Italian, and the 20-year-old rose to the occasion with a 6-2 6-2 victory in Turin.

Daniil Medvedev is already assured of a place in the semi-finals, and Sinner could join the defending champion in qualifying from the Red Group following a commanding bow at the Pala Alpitour.

The first alternate raised the roof on home soil, with Hurkacz unable to break his serve as the seventh seed from Poland suffered back-to-back defeats to prop up the group.

Sinner, a winner of four titles in a stellar season, broke twice in each set and won 74 per cent of points behind his first serve as he took centre stage soon after he might have been a spectator.

The world number 11 said: "I knew around 5[pm] that I would play. I was ready to go on court. It is an incredible feeling playing here in Italy with thousands of people cheering for you, and I am trying my best. I will enjoy the moment. I played well and felt good in the warm-up. It was an incredible match."

Sinner could move into the last four if he beats Medvedev or if Alexander Zverev is beaten by Hurkacz on Thursday.   WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS 

Sinner – 17/11
Hurkacz – 14/14

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS 

Sinner – 5/0
Hurkacz – 4/0

BREAK POINTS WON 

Sinner – 4/6
Hurkacz – 0/5

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