Dr. Emir Crowne to defend Ebony Drysdale-Daley against Jamaica Judo Association's allegations

By June 20, 2024

Noted sports attorney Dr. Emir Crowne, along with Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones, and Sayeed Bernard, have stepped up to represent Jamaican judo athlete Ebony Drysdale-Daley amidst a heated dispute with the Jamaica Judo Association (JJA). The association, led by Dwayne Barnett, has recently accused the British-born judoka of having two whereabouts failures and being on the brink of a ban, a move that Dr Crowne has vehemently criticized.

Dr. Crowne, an international sports lawyer with a history of defending athletes in high-profile cases, blasted the JJA for what he describes as a "smear campaign" against Drysdale-Daley. He expressed outrage over the JJA's decision to publicly disclose confidential information about Drysdale-Daley's whereabouts failures in a press release, calling it "absolutely atrocious" and "wildly irresponsible."

“The Jamaican Judo Association’s action to disclose such confidential information is absolutely atrocious. Athletes enjoy the protection of confidentiality until there is actually some sort of anti-doping rule violation asserted against them,” Crowne explained. He pointed out that an anti-doping rule violation only occurs after three whereabouts failures within a 12-month period, making the JJA's disclosure premature and unethical.

The JJA's press release came as a response to a video posted by Drysdale-Daley, in which she accused the association of bias in selecting athletes for the Paris Olympic Games. Drysdale-Daley, who made history as Jamaica's first judoka at the Olympic Games in Tokyo 2021, alleged that her attempts to qualify for the upcoming Olympics were being deliberately hindered by the JJA in favour of her male counterpart, Ashley McKenzie.

“I feel the federation has shown no impartiality. There is a real question of ethics and integrity. The Jamaican Judo Association is blocking me from attending and competing in my last qualifying event, an event that I have self-funded and paid for,” Drysdale-Daley said in her video.

The JJA, in its defence, cited Drysdale-Daley’s failure to meet deadlines and her previous conduct at the Commonwealth Games 2022, which they described as "unbecoming of an athlete."

In response, Dr. Crowne called for the Jamaican Olympic Association (JOA), the International Judo Federation (IJF), and the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) to investigate the JJA's conduct. “I encourage JADCO, I encourage WADA, I encourage the JOA, I encourage the international federation to take a hard look at this press release and see if it was appropriate to disclose what is otherwise completely confidential,” Crowne asserted.

Dr. Crowne, known for his representation of athletes like Jamaica’s Ryker Hylton and Briana Williams, argued that the JJA's actions have damaged its own reputation more than Drysdale-Daley's. “In attempting to paint the athlete in a negative light, the Jamaican Judo Association has now painted themselves in a negative light through this breach of confidence, and it should not go unpunished,” he declared.

The disciplinary process for Drysdale-Daley, who has already received a notice of suspension from the JJA, remains in flux. With Dr Crowne and his team offering their legal expertise, the battle between Drysdale-Daley and the JJA is poised to intensify, drawing significant attention from the sports community as the saga unfolds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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