Not enough black voices in football? - The commentators take on racism

By Ricardo Chambers & Donald Oliver July 09, 2020

Only one lead black commentator was a part of a recent study which highlighted racial bias in football commentary in Europe. 

Danny McLoughlin, lead researcher for the study done by RunRepeat in partnership with the Professional Footballers' Association says black voices aren't represented enough in football commentary. 

McLoughlin, who was speaking on The Commentators podcast with Ricardo Chambers and Donald Oliver, said the study should have also made note of the lack of black commentators.

McLoughlin says he has received positive reactions from different stakeholders including commentators, but he believes media bosses are the ones who have to enforce the change

Last week, the findings of a study which looked into racial bias in football commentary were released, and needless to say, it raised a few eyebrows.

The study analyzed more than two thousand statements from commentators in matches during the current 2019/2020 season. 

The study was to determine if there was a difference in the way media speaks about players of different skin colour. One striking example had to do with commentators speaking about a player’s intelligence.

In 63.33% of instances where there was a criticism of a player’s intelligence, a player with darker skin tone was the target, while whenever there was praise, 62.60% of that praise was aimed at players with a lighter skin tone.

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