Alexander Zverev and Stefanos Tsitsipas suffered frustration on day five of the ATP Cup, as Russia and Great Britain joined Australia and Serbia in the quarter-finals.

Germany were eliminated after a 2-1 defeat to Canada where a troubled Zverev lost his third consecutive match of the tournament.

He went down 6-2 6-2 to Denis Shapovalov in 70 minutes after also suffering defeats to Alex de Minaur and Tsitsipas in his country's first two ties.

Jan-Lennard Struff had beaten Felix Auger-Aliassime, but the Canadian later teamed up with fellow youngster Shapovalov to win the decisive doubles against Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies in straight sets.

Australia had already won Group F, so Canada will wait for the results on day six to see if they will progress as one of the two best runners-up.

"I'm really happy to get the win and hopefully we can go through," said Shapovalov.

"I feel like we're definitely one of the top teams and I feel like we definitely deserve to go to Sydney. Hopefully, if we do get that chance, we can do some really big damage."

Zverev's serving woes continued as he won only 29 per cent of points on his second serve and had seven double faults, taking his weekly total to 31 in three matches.

The world number seven said: "There's a lot of things that I still need to improve, but it's the start of the season."

Hosts Australia kept up the momentum by winning their third straight tie against Greece, as Tsitsipas fell to defeat.

With De Minaur rested, Nick Kyrgios took over number one duties and won a tense encounter 7-6 (9-7) 6-7 (3-7) 7-6 (7-5).

Tsitsipas inadvertently injured his father Apostolos when smashing his racket in the team zone after losing the opening set tie-break and Greece ended the week without winning a tie.

But the ATP Finals champion was in a reflective mood afterwards, saying: "We had a difficult draw here in Brisbane.

"Canada, Australia … Germany, one of the strongest nations in the game, playing against a small, tiny little nation like Greece, which has no history in tennis at all? 

"You've got to feel proud. We fought very hard and we wanted to prove to the rest of the world that we can play tennis anywhere."

Russia booked their place in the quarter-finals with a 3-0 win over Norway, Daniil Medvedev handing Casper Ruud his first singles defeat of the week.

Italy were victorious against the United States but cannot reach the next stage despite winning two of their three Group D ties.

Great Britain won 3-0 against Moldova and Belgium's 2-1 win over Bulgaria meant Tim Henman's team progressed as Group C winners and will face Australia in Sydney on Thursday.

Belgium, like Canada, face a nervous wait for Wednesday's results with Spain, Croatia, Japan, Austria, South Africa, France and Argentina the other countries vying to fill the four remaining spots.

An emotional Nick Kyrgios explained his motivations for donating to the effort fighting Australia's bushfires after helping his nation to victory over Germany at the ATP Cup.

Kyrgios beat Jan-Lennard Struff 6-4 7-6 (7-4) in Brisbane, sending down 20 aces after his pledge to give 200 Australian dollars to the bushfires effort for each service winner he hits in January.

Alex de Minaur – Kyrgios' team-mate at the event, who impressively came from a set down to defeat an ill-tempered Alex Zverev 4-6 7-6 (7-3) 6-2 – followed suit after Kyrgios tweeted his intention to help, while stars from other sports have also joined in.

Brisbane Heat captain Chris Lynn struck three sixes as he top-scored in his team's win over Hobart Hurricanes in the Big Bash League on Friday, with each maximum worth $250 to the recovery effort.

"I don't really care about the praise too much. I just think we've got the ability and platform to do something like that," Kyrgios told Amazon Prime when asked about the movement he inadvertently started.

"My home town is Canberra and we've got the most toxic air in the world at the moment, so it is pretty sad. It's tough."

Having appeared choked up at that point, Kyrgios added: "I just chucked up a tweet and everyone got behind it. It is bigger than tennis.

"It's going to all the families, firefighters, animals, everyone who is losing homes, losing families. It's a real thing.

Australia completed a 3-0 Group F win after Chris Guccione and John Peers beat German doubles pair Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies 6-3 6-4.

In the section's other match, Canada were similarly emphatic against Greece, with Denis Shapovalov winning a pair of tie-breaks to best Stefanos Tsitsipas after Felix Auger-Aliassime demolished Michail Pervolarakis 6-1 6-3.

Auger-Aliassime and Shapovalov then combined to win the doubles rubber against the same opponents, prevailing 6-2 6-3.

Great Britain and the United States both allowed leads to slip against Bulgaria and Norway respectively.

In Group C, Cameron Norrie beat world number 423 Dimitar Kuzmanov in three sets and Dan Evans made a fast start against Grigor Dimitrov to go a set up.

But Dimitrov prevailed 2-6 6-4 6-1 and he and Alexandar Lazarov triumphed after three tie-breaks against Jamie Murray and Joe Salisbury in the small hours of the Sydney morning.

Taylor Fritz beat Viktor Durasovic 6-2 6-2 and John Isner had the USA in charge of the second singles rubber when he took the opening tie break versus Casper Ruud, only for two match points and a second breaker to go against him. He eventually lost, going down 7-5 in the deciding set.

Ruud and Durasovic then recovered from dropping the first set to beat Austin Krajicek and Rajeev Ram 10-5 in a match tie-break in Perth.

Steve Darcis and David Goffin inspired Belgium to a 3-0 Group C win over Moldova, while Daniil Medvedev's 1-6 6-1-6-3 victory against Fabio Fognini helped clinch a 3-0 victory for Russia against Italy in Group D.

Rafael Nadal says rising stars Daniil Medvedev and Stefanos Tsitsipas can push for grand slam glory as the old guard face up to the "brutal" reality they cannot go on forever.

Nadal admits it is an inevitability his tennis career is coming towards the end of its shelf life, and that the same applies to the likes of Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic.

Between them, Nadal, Federer and Djokovic have amassed a startling 55 grand slam singles titles, with all three going beyond the previous record haul of 14 majors achieved by Pete Sampras that many expected would stand for decades.

Federer is 38, Nadal turns 34 next June and Djokovic will be 33 in May. It is no small wonder all three remain serious contenders for every grand slam, having already dominated men's tennis for over a decade.

There would be genuine surprise if the Australian Open men's singles final on February 2 does not feature at least one of the trio, given that aside from Stan Wawrinka's 2015 triumph they have shut out the opposition in Melbourne since 2006.

Yet Tsitsipas won the ATP Finals in November for the biggest win of the 21-year-old Greek's career, while Medvedev had a stellar 2019, particularly on hard courts over the summer, with Nadal having to dig deep to deny the Russian in a remarkable US Open final.

Asked about the 'NextGen' players, Nadal told AS: "It's normal that there's a buzz around them and it will get louder because we're getting older every day and they're getting better every day.

"Every year they're improving. I think that they can win the biggest tournaments, like Medvedev, Tsitsipas and [Dominic] Thiem did this year.

"I think that [Denis] Shapovalov is going to make a big step up this year and [Jannik] Sinner's trajectory is incredible.

"They're here to stay. We're still around but the cycle of life is brutal and at some point that's going to change, and sooner rather than later."

Nadal is surprised he remains at the top of the game, having ended the year as world number one for the fifth time.

He bought into talk early in his career that his hard-grafting playing style would not be conducive to a long stint in the game.

"To be honest, at this stage of my life I didn’t think I’d still be playing tennis," Nadal said.

"I was told because of my style I wouldn’t have a very long career. I believed what I was told, so I thought that by now I’d be retired and starting a family."

Rafael Nadal became the first player to win the Mubadala World Tennis Championship five times as he overcame Stefanos Tsitsipas 6-7 (3-7) 7-5 7-6 (7-3) in an enthralling final.

Having beat Novak Djokovic on Friday, ATP Finals champion Tsitsipas looked well on his way to capping off a brilliant 2019 with a maiden triumph in the exhibition event in Abu Dhabi when he came from a break down to win the first set.

But it was world number one Nadal who rallied to claim his fifth title on a tie-break at the culmination of a thrilling encounter which lasted over three hours.

Nadal saved two break points in each of his first two service games and another three to thwart the Greek and level at 3-3.

It was the Spaniard who claimed the elusive first break to go 5-4 up, but he failed to serve out the set, making a string of errors as Tsitsipas got back on serve.

The momentum was with the world number six, who charged into a 5-2 lead in the tie-break and took the set when Nadal netted a forehand, having been disgruntled when he was forced to replay a point he had on his racket when Tsitsipas challenged.

Nadal started the second set with a hold to love and the two served up high-quality rallies, but break-point opportunities were not forthcoming until Tsitsipas had two chances to go 5-4 up.

A battling Nadal stood firm with a defiant hold, before capitalising on his first break point to level proceedings.

Tsitsipas passed up another two chances to break at the start of the decider and Nadal made him pay, breaking to go 4-2 up, only for the youngster to immediately break back.

Yet Tsitsipas' efforts ultimately proved fruitless, with Nadal, who took a 4-1 lead in the tie-break before losing successive points, holding his nerve to secure victory on his first match point.

In Saturday's early match, world number two Djokovic secured third place by defeating Karen Khachanov 7-5 6-3.

Stefanos Tsitsipas will tackle Rafael Nadal in the final of the Mubadala World Tennis Championship after outlasting Novak Djokovic at the exhibition event in Abu Dhabi.

ATP Finals champion Tsitsipas lost the first set to former world number one Djokovic but rallied to win 3-6 7-6 (7-4) 6-4 and claim another impressive scalp.

Djokovic was 5-1 down in set two but dragged himself back into contention to draw level at 5-5, only for Tsitsipas to win the tie-break.

And having squandered four chances to break in the decider, Djokovic succumbed as Tsitsipas wrapped up the win on his first match point.

Tsitsipas' reward for victory is a final against world number one Nadal, who defeated Karen Khachanov 6-1 6-3 in his semi-final.

In the early match, Andrey Rublev secured fifth place by overcoming Hyeon Chung 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-1).

World number six Stefanos Tsitsipas eased past Andrey Rublev to secure a Mubadala World Tennis Championship semi-final against defending champion Novak Djokovic.

Just weeks out from the start of the 2020 ATP Tour season, Tsitsipas geared up for the new campaign with a dominant win in the opening match of the Abu Dhabi exhibition tournament.

The Greek, who won the 2019 ATP Finals, saw off Rublev - a deputy for Gael Monfils - 6-3 6-4, seizing his first match point.

Djokovic is up next, with Tsitsipas having won twice and lost twice in competitive meetings with the great Serbian, each of them coming at Masters 1000 tournaments.

In the other semi-final, Rafael Nadal will renew his one-sided rivalry with Karen Khachanov, who saw off Hyeon Chung 7-6 (7-4) 6-4.

Top-ranked Nadal has won each of his seven prior meetings with Khachanov, including as recently as at the Davis Cup Finals, where Spain went on to claim the title.

Khachanov had stepped in for fellow Russian Daniil Medvedev, the outstanding star of the second half of 2019, who pushed Nadal to five sets in the US Open final.

Rublev and Chung will now meet in Friday's fifth-place play-off before the two last-four clashes.

Meanwhile, in the one-off women's exhibition, five-time major champion Maria Sharapova saw off Ajla Tomljanovic in straight sets.

The 32-year-old edged a break-heavy opener but trailed in the second set before levelling and then nudging in front to avoid a tie-break, triumphing 6-4 7-5.

Stefanos Tsitsipas believes he is "really close" to winning a grand slam after his ATP Finals success on Sunday.

The Greek, 21, became the youngest player to win the ATP Finals since 2001 after a thrilling 6-7 (6-8) 6-2 7-6 (7-4) victory over Dominic Thiem in London.

Tsitsipas, a semi-finalist at the Australian Open this year, feels a major success is not far away, with Wimbledon a goal.

"For sure Wimbledon is the tournament that has a lot of tradition. I think most of the players if you ask would want to win Wimbledon, but for me any grand slam would be great," he told a news conference.

"I feel like my game is getting better over time. I believe I'm really close on being crowned a grand slam champion. I know these are strong words that I say but I do feel like I belong to be there.

"I'm competing against some of the best players in the world and the amount of effort and the amount of work I put [in] every day deserves to have an outcome like this."

While Tsitsipas and Thiem reached the final in London, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic won two grand slams each in 2019.

The 'Big Three' of Nadal, Djokovic and Roger Federer have won 55 grand slams since 2003, including the past 12, and Tsitsipas is aware of the huge challenge awaiting the next generation.

"The thing that we have, the 'Big Three' dominating in the grand slams the last couple of years makes it really difficult for us because someone needs to get the job done to defeat them [in the] early rounds because once they get deep into a tournament they tend, as we saw, over the years to get better and play better, feel better," he said.

"For me, that's a really difficult task to do, for players to be able to beat them in these grand slams because it's a best-of-five format and this gives them more chances to stay in the match.

"It's not a best of three. If things were best of three it could have been much more different when it comes to grand slam champions over the years.

"So, that's an issue because they have been sharing how many grand slams? I don't know, 60 something?

"And for the young guys, it's all about time. I don't know. We'll either have to beat them or wait for them."

Stefanos Tsitsipas described himself as "living the dream" after knocking out Roger Federer to book an ATP Finals showpiece against Dominic Thiem.

Greek star Tsitsipas ousted Federer 6-3 6-4 in the semi-final of the season-ending event to reach the biggest final of his career.

Tsitsipas has had an up-and-down year which started with a run to the last four of the Australian Open and was followed by a mid-season slump, but he appears to be keeping his best until last.

The 21-year-old saved 11 of Federer's 12 break points on Saturday and explained beating the 20-time grand slam champion, who he watched winning major tournaments growing up, was difficult to comprehend.

"I grew up watching Roger here at the ATP Finals and Wimbledon and other finals," said Tsitsipas, who also beat Federer in the last 16 of the Australian Open.

"I wished one day I could face him and now I'm here living the dream.

"I remember myself being one of the kids here watching the event and I could never picture myself here. But it can happen.

"This victory is probably one of my best moments of the season. These are the moments I live for.

"This does feel, in a way, like a grand slam, because all eyes are here. Everyone knows this event. Everyone who watches tennis knows what the ATP Finals are.

"For me, it's a great new start, great new beginning to be here, playing in the Finals. It's really very difficult to be in that position I am in right now and it counts a lot."

Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the prime minister of Greece, was in attendance for the match and greeted Tsitsipas afterwards, highlighting the magnitude of his triumph.

"I'm really glad I played well, stayed calm," Tsitsipas said.

"It's a great moment not just for me, for everyone else, my country, my team. I'm proud of myself, how hard I fought, how concentrated I stayed in the break points. 

"I didn't crack under pressure. I was very composed and very mature in my decisions."

Tsitsipas and Thiem have met on six occasions over the last two years.

Thiem won four of those, including the most recent clash last month, which was a three-set battle in the China Open final.

Roger Federer conceded he had let chances slip through his fingers and made "pretty bad" mistakes as he crashed out of the ATP Finals with defeat to Stefanos Tsitsipas.

The Swiss star went down 6-3 6-4 in London, taking only one of his 12 break-point opportunities to lose the semi-final in straight sets just two days on from a near-faultless victory over Novak Djokovic.

It means he ends the year having not won any of the four grand slams or the season-ending event, with Sunday's final to be contested by Dominic Thiem and Tsitsipas.

Federer turns 39 in 2020 but, as he reflected on a year that saw him squander two championship points against Djokovic in the Wimbledon final, he is optimistic he will have plenty more opportunities to win top tournaments.

"No doubt I had my chances," Federer – who hit 26 unforced errors including two wayward smashes in his opening service game – said after his defeat, which leaves him without an ATP Finals title since 2011. 

"The break points were part of it. I had some good spells, but the spells where things were not working well, they were pretty bad.

"Getting broken and missing two smashes in one game – that hasn't happened in a long, long time or ever, so that was tough.

"At this level, you just can't have it happen, so that was pretty disappointing."

Of his 2020 hopes, Federer said: "I've got to keep on playing at the level like I have this year and then I will create some chances. 

"[I have] Got to take care of my body, listen to the signs, work well with the team and get the balance right with everything that's happening in my life."

Federer had produced a fine display to see off Djokovic in the round-robin stage but conceded he cannot afford to let his level drop when big matches and important moments arrive in quick succession.

He added: "When the matches come, it's not maybe as easy as it was maybe 10, 15 years ago, where you're just going to play very good day in, day out. 

"Maybe you need to do extra effort sometimes for that to happen. Maybe that's what it felt like, just things were complicated. 

"But I've got to maybe do even a better job at figuring these moments out, because the opportunities were there. They were there in other moments as well this season, maybe Indian Wells [in a final defeat to Thiem] or Wimbledon.

"That can change an entire season around, the confidence, the flow of things."

Federer retained an optimistic outlook going into another season on the ATP Tour, adding: "I'm happy [with] how I played this season. I thought I played some consistent, solid tennis and I'm extremely excited for next season."

Stefanos Tsitsipas described playing Roger Federer as the "biggest honour" after he overcame the 20-time grand slam champion in the ATP Finals.

Tsitsipas - debuting at the season-ending tournament - set up a final against either Dominic Thiem or defending champion Alexander Zverev with a 6-3 6-4 win on Saturday.

While Federer was wasteful, failing to take 11 out of 12 break points afforded to him by the Greek, Tsitsipas showed clinical composure to progress to his sixth final of 2019.

Saturday's triumph marks a second win over Federer for Tsitsipas, who also beat the world number three in the Australian Open, and the 21-year-old insisted there is no higher honour in men's tennis than going up against the Swiss.

"I am so proud of myself today, a great performance and once again the fans were great. I really enjoyed my time on the court," Tsitsipas said.

"Sometimes, matches like this you wonder how you overcome all these difficulties, those break points down. It's really like a mental struggle so I'm really proud that I managed to save so many break points today.

"Roger was playing good, shout out to him as well because he's played pretty well this week, an inspiration as always.

"Playing him is the biggest honour I can have, today's win is probably one of the best matches of this season and these are the moments I wait for and want to prove the best of my game."

"It's not easy to copy Roger. This guy does magic on the court so I'm trying to do half of what he does. He can be so good sometimes. We all have different styles.

"There is so much to learn from all these players. I grew up watching Roger as a kid, watching him here at the finals, Wimbledon, plenty of finals. I wished I could step out on the court one day and face him and today I'm here, living the dream.

"I remember being a kid here, watching the event, I could never picture myself standing here, but it happened, dreams do come true."

Tsitsipas has been in brilliant form at the O2 arena, and will now face Thiem or Zverev - who he beat in the round-robin stage - in Sunday's showdown.

"I have no preference [Thiem or Zverev]. Anything can happen in the final," he added.

"I played Zverev already in the group and last year he proved, when he lost to [Novak] Djokovic in the group and then went out in the final and beat him. Now I need to be super careful. Let's hope for a good semi-final, I'm going to watch it."

ATP Finals debutant Stefanos Tsitsipas booked his place in Sunday's final with a clinical 6-3 6-4 triumph over a wasteful Roger Federer at the O2 Arena.

Tsitsipas was beaten by world number one Rafael Nadal in a marathon match on Friday but showed little sign of weariness as he claimed his second win over six-time ATP Finals champion Federer.

The 21-year-old saved 12 break points in his Australia Open victory over Federer in January and the world number three failed to take 11 out of 12 this time around.

Tsitsipas made Federer pay, progressing into his sixth final of what has been a fantastic season, with Dominic Thiem or defending champion Alexander Zverev awaiting.

Having held serve in game one, Tsitsipas broke at the first time of asking with a well-worked point to take control of the set.

Tsitsipas saved three break points in game seven, though Federer subsequently held to love before winning a brilliant point at the culmination of a thrilling rally.

Three set points went begging for Tsitsipas as Federer teed up a sixth opportunity to break, only for a long backhand to hand his opponent a reprieve.

An incredible game rolled on, but at the seventh time of asking, Tsitsipas finally wrapped up a 47-minute first set.

Federer started set two with a crisp hold, yet the Swiss found himself a set and a break down when he sent a weak effort into the net as Tsitsipas broke to love.

But Federer responded brilliantly, taking a 40-love lead on Tsitsipas' serve, only to once again squander three more break points.

A sublime backhand and exquisite drop shot set up Federer's 10th break point, however, and this time he took advantage to draw level at 2-2.

Tsitsipas broke back immediately though and two overhit efforts put Federer two games down.

Another strong hold of serve put Tsitsipas on the brink, and - despite some nervy shots on his last service game - a thumping ace secured a deserved victory.

Rafael Nadal produced a magnificent comeback to keep his ATP Finals hopes alive with a three-set victory over Stefanos Tsitsipas at the O2 Arena.

Nadal went into Friday's contest knowing he had to win to have a chance of progressing to the last four of the season-ending showpiece.

His prospects of achieving that feat looked slim when the in-form Tsitsipas - who won his first two matches in straight sets - took the opener in a tie-break.

However, Nadal, who fought back from 5-1 down in the third set to see off Daniil Medvedev on Wednesday, again demonstrated his incredible powers of recovery in an absorbing encounter.

Devastating off both wings and supreme at the net, Nadal clinched a 6-7 (4-7) 6-4 7-5 triumph in two hours and 52 minutes.

For the Spaniard to join Tsitsipas in progressing from Group Andre Agassi, he will need Medvedev to beat Alexander Zverev. Should the Russian do him that favour, Nadal will face Roger Federer in the semi-finals.

Neither player faced a break point in a high-quality first set, but it was Nadal whose defences were breached in the tie-break.

The world number one went long after an accurate forehand down the line from Tsitsipas, who wisely challenged mid-point to bring up a pair of set points. 

Tsitsipas sent down five aces in the opener and he took his first set point in that fashion, Nadal having no answer for a serve down the T.

A sensational forehand return helped Nadal bring up the first break points of the match in the fifth game of the second, but Tsitsipas saved both and an emphatic forehand volley saw him hold.

With the help of a spectacular passing shot, Nadal went 30-0 up on Tsitsipas' next service game, only for the world number six to again fight his way out of trouble behind some hugely impressive serving.

However, the pressure finally told in the ninth game as, after a rasping overhead from Nadal, Tsitsipas skewed a simple forehand wide to surrender the first break of an engrossing contest.

Nadal's fists were pumping when Tsitsipas sent a return long to set up a deciding set and he maintained his intensity in a fascinating third.

A brutal cross-court backhand return gave Nadal his third break point of the set at 3-3 but an admirably dogged Tsitsipas held firm once more.

The reward finally came for the relentless Nadal as he produced an incredible stretching forehand that forced Tsitsipas into an awkward volley he could only send wide, and the reigning French Open and US Open champion made no mistake in holding to wrap up a superb victory.

Stefanos Tsitsipas made light work of defending ATP Finals champion Alexander Zverev to book his place in the last four in London with a 6-3 6-2 victory.

Zverev outdid world number one Rafael Nadal on Monday but could not match the speed, power and precision shown by Tsitsipas, who has made the semi-finals on his first appearance in the season-ending tournament.

A break on Zverev's final serve of the opener put the 21-year-old in control, with another concession of serve from the world number seven following at the start of set two.

With victory firmly in his sights, Tsitsipas did not let up as he charged on to serve out a dominant triumph in just 75 minutes.

"I was really surprised by my performance," Tsitsipas said. "I did everything right. I just played my game. I had a clear picture on the court."

After an even start, it was Tsitsipas who made the breakthrough.

Having played two excellent drop shots in succession to hold serve, the Greek broke with an exquisite return onto Zverev's toes to lead 5-3.

Tsitsipas took the 39-minute set at the first time of asking – Zverev sending a lob just beyond the baseline.

The German survived two break points at the start of set two, with a fine backhand pass at the culmination of a long rally forcing deuce.

But Tsitsipas could smell blood and, after squandering another chance to break, did so at the fourth time of asking with a combination of superb backhand efforts.

Tsitsipas failed to take another break point at 3-1 up, sending a makeable passing stroke out of play, but made no mistake at the next time of asking with a perfectly constructed attack.

Zverev challenged well to stay in the match, but it merely stalled the inevitable as Tsitsipas – who faces Nadal in his final group match – went on to secure a fourth straight win over his opponent with a sweetly struck ace.

Stefanos Tsitsipas has claimed his 7-6 (7-5) 6-4 win over Daniil Medvedev at the ATP Finals "means more than extra".

The pair have both enjoyed terrific campaigns in 2019 - while Medvedev has won four titles and made it to a further five finals, including in the US Open, 21-year-old Tsitsipas has cemented himself in the world's top 10.

However, it is no secret Tsitsipas and Medvedev do not see eye to eye, a rivalry which was established in March 2018 during their first meeting.

Medvedev came from behind to win, but was unhappy with his Greek opponent for a heated handshake, with the umpire forced to intervene.

Tsitsipas' triumph on Monday is his first in six attempts against Medvedev, who has won 29 of his last 34 matches and was in the hunt for a 60th tour-level win of 2019.

"It means more than extra," Tsitsipas told reporters after his win. "Our chemistry definitely isn't the best."

According to Tsitsipas, their rivalry began when Medvedev complained that the youngster did not hold his hand up to apologise for a rally winning shot hitting the net during their clash in Miami last year.

"He started telling me that what I do is unsportsmanlike. I tried not to pay attention, because I knew that it was something intentional, something that he wanted to pass to me," Tsitsipas added.

"Somehow it did affect me. I did get p***** and said what I said, which I do regret, but at the time I was very frustrated that things happened this way."

World number four Medvedev, meanwhile, acknowledged the better player won at the O2 Arena on Monday.

"He was better today, but I felt like I was missing some things." the Russian told reporters. 

"This frustrates me after. I do think it would frustrate me against any other opponent. Of course I wanted to make it an even bigger head-to-head, but it's the way it is."

Stefanos Tsitsipas produced a scintillating performance to beat rival Daniil Medvedev for the first time in a battle of two ATP Finals debutants at the O2 Arena.

Medvedev had won all five encounters with Tsitsipas before the Greek finally came out on top on Monday, winning 7-6 (7-5) 6-4.

Tsitsipas had a spring in his step from the start against an opponent whose game he has described as "boring" and did not face a solitary break point in the Group Andre Agassi opener.

Just the one break in the second set was enough for a fired-up Tsitsipas to seal a straight-sets victory over the fourth seed from Russia, who has been outstanding this year but faces a tough ask to reach the last four in London.

Tsitsipas started on the front foot and forced a break point in the second game, but Medvedev held to level at 1-1. 

That was the one break-point opportunity of the opening set, and it was Tsitsipas who then came out on top in a tight tie-break, punching a volley on the line for a third mini-break and letting out a roar as his opponent netted on the first set point.

There was no let-up with the high tempo in the second set as the two continued to trade blows from the baseline and demonstrate their prowess at the net.

Medvedev fended off two break points before holding for a 4-3 lead, but he gifted a relentless Tsitsipas a break point when he left a ball which landed in, and an errant backhand left him 5-4 down.

Powerful sixth seed Tsitsipas jumped for joy after serving out a match in which he won 89 per cent of points behind his first serve. 

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