Dean Elgar was again frustrated by his dismissal in the Cape Town Test against England, the opener this time unhappy with the Ultra-Edge technology that saw him fall to Joe Denly on day four.

The South Africa batsman had openly acknowledged his error in the first innings when his key wicket went to Dom Bess, but he felt unfairly treated in his second stint with the bat.

The Proteas were steadily chipping away at a target of 438, 71 without loss, when Elgar was given out to Denly having edged behind to Jos Buttler.

Elgar was adamant there was no contact, however, even as Ultra-Edge showed a tiny spike when the ball passed his bat, costing his team a review.

Asked if he hit the ball after South Africa reached stumps on 126-2, Elgar told Sky Sports: "No. I wouldn't waste the referral knowing that I've nicked it.

"I don't play cricket like that. I like to see myself as someone who takes the out if I'm definitely out. Like I say, I wouldn't waste it on that.

"It's a bit of an emotional time when those kinds of things happen. Obviously, I had to simmer down and, watching the footage, I could still say I didn't hit it."

On Ultra-Edge, Elgar added: "Please don't [get me a fine]. I don't know.

"I think I'm just going to reserve my comments, because I obviously don't want to get in trouble with the ICC. As a player, I can say I'm very confident I didn't nick it.

"Our coach also alluded to [the elbow hitting the pad on Ultra-Edge]. It is what it is, and so be it. It's what creates the theatre of Test cricket, I suppose.

"Sometimes you have those things go your way, and sometimes you don't. Unfortunately, today, feeling a million dollars, it just didn't work out for us. But we've still got guys in the shed."

Despite Elgar's frustration, South Africa remain in the Test match, 312 runs short of victory with eight wickets remaining heading into the final day.

"I think it's ball by ball at the moment," Elgar said. "We've got 540 balls and we're going to try to break it up per batsman.

"We just need two or three guys to come in and really grind it out. We've got batters in the shed who can do it, and the wicket's playing quite nicely. You've just got to start well on this wicket."

England opener Dom Sibley scored an unbeaten first Test century as England set South Africa the target of 438 on day four in Cape Town, a task the hosts quickly set about.

The standout performer of the second Test, Sibley finished on 133 from 311 balls as England declared on 391-8 in the second innings, giving their bowlers a day and a half to get the Proteas out.

But early progress was slow with the ball and, led by debutant Pieter Malan (63 not out), South Africa reached stumps still very much in the match on 126-2.

Ben Stokes had accelerated the tourists' innings with an explosive 72 off 47 in a partnership of 92 with Sibley, arriving at the beginning of the day with England already 264 runs in front.

Stokes' highest Test score came at Newlands in 2016, and he appeared in the mood for more of the same on Monday, quickly plundering boundaries as Sibley held his ground at the opposite end.

The star all-rounder mustered seven fours and three sixes in all as he raced past fifty before Sibley finally reached his patient 269-ball century with a sweep through backward square to the fence.

Stokes looked destined to join his team-mate on three figures in double-quick time, but he could not beat Rassie van der Dussen at long-on, caught off Keshav Maharaj's bowling.

Ollie Pope (3) quickly departed, and Jos Buttler joined Sibley and made 23 off 18. Sam Curran added 13, before England declared with Stuart Broad in the middle.

But South Africa started off fairly comfortably in reply, openers Malan and Dean Elgar only belatedly put under a little pressure in a Joe Denly spell shortly before tea.

Denly (1-26) returned following the interval and tempted a thin edge from Elgar (34) for a much-needed breakthrough the batsman unsuccessfully reviewed.

England soon grew frustrated again, though, as Malan paired with Zubayr Hamza (18) and brought up his first Test fifty, and James Anderson was sent in for a last tilt at the resolute pair.

That change did the trick, Hamza edging Anderson (1-18) behind in the second of the veteran's consecutive maiden overs, leaving the tourists eight wickets short of a series-levelling victory.

Dean Elgar described his dismissal to Dom Bess as a "brainfart" after South Africa collapsed on day two of the second Test against England at Newlands. 

The opener and Rassie van der Dussen put on 117 for the fourth wicket after the Proteas slumped to 40-3 in reply to the tourists' 269 all out, but Elgar threw his wicket away with a century in sight.

Left-hander Elgar appeared to lose his patience on 88 with a big swing at spinner Bess and was caught by England captain Joe Root at mid-off.

England fought back superbly in the final session, James Anderson taking 3-34 as South Africa were reduced to 215-8 - trailing by 5 runs at the close on Saturday.

"It was [about] trying to be as patient as possible," Elgar told a news conference of his approach alongside Van der Dussen, who made 68. "If he overpitches it, try to hit the ball to long-on. It was pretty much as easy as that.

"I felt I played him very well until the brainfart - and then I was sat in the changing room. That's all it is.

"[It was] a big one. I don't think it was anything to do with the patience factor. I might have just chosen the wrong ball to do what I wanted to do.

"A few overs ago, I hit him for four. It's a great shot, isn't it? And now you choose the wrong ball, and that's pretty much all she wrote."

Elgar was apologetic for his dismissal, adding: "It's actually not right of me playing shots like that, especially being a senior batter. I shouldn't be putting other guys under pressure like that.

"But I'm also a human being - I'm allowed to make mistakes. I've got two arms, two legs and another thing, so I'm allowed to."

Elgar acknowledged England are now on top, with Keshav Maharaj dismissed with what proved to be the final ball of the day from Anderson..

"I would say, after the last hour, they've potentially got one foot ahead of us," Elgar said. "It's difficult to look into the future of this game.

"We know we've got a good battle coming up tomorrow with the ball in hand."

Sam Curran said England must dismiss South Africa early on day three and "bat big" after Ben Stokes' catches and a fired-up pace attack gave them the edge in the second Test at Newlands.

Curran and Stuart Broad took two wickets apiece on Saturday, while James Anderson claimed 3-34 to leave the Proteas 215-8 at stumps in reply to the tourists' 269 all out, having been 157-3 shortly after tea.

Stokes took four slip catches and put down two other chances, leaving him one away from becoming the first England fielder, excluding wicketkeepers, to grab five in a Test innings.

South Africa trail by 54 runs and Curran says England must take command on Sunday as they strive to level the four-match series at 1-1.

"What a way to finish the day. Hopefully we can get a lead," Curran told Sky Sports.

"We're in a good position. Hopefully we can get those two wickets in the morning and bat big."

Dean Elgar (88) and Rassie van der Dussen (68) were looking like giving the hosts a platform to build a big lead, the latter capitalising on being given a reprieve when he edged behind on 16, but Broad overstepped.

Spinner Dom Bess bowled 27 overs, foraging for an opening before he claimed the crucial fourth-wicket breakthrough, drawing Elgar into a hoik that found the safe hands of Joe Root.

"Bessy did an amazing job. There's not much for the seamers and not much for Bessy," Curran said.

"That is a flat wicket but at the same time there is a channel that we're trying to hit. It's about being as patient as possible and every now and again there's something there."

James Anderson and Stuart Broad led the way as England dug themselves out of trouble in the second Test at Newlands - with Ben Stokes on the brink of a record.

After being bowled out for 269 in their first innings, England allowed South Africa to recover from a vulnerable 40-3 as Dean Elgar and Rassie van der Dussen piled on 117 for the fourth wicket.

But a rush of five wickets after tea allowed England to reassert themselves in the contest, South Africa ending day two in Cape Town on 215-8 and thoroughly rattled.

Stokes' four catches in the innings put him one short of becoming the first English fielder - other than wicketkeepers - to take five in a Test innings.

The day's play ended with Anderson's third wicket as he had Keshav Maharaj caught by Dom Sibley at third slip.

Anderson's 3-34, Broad's 2-36 and Sam Curran's 2-39 showed up South Africa's limitations against England's seam attack, while heavily-worked spinner Dom Bess took the key wicket of Dean Elgar, who made 88 before skying one to the tourists' captain, Joe Root.

England, on 262-9 overnight, predictably did not go much further, adding only seven runs before Anderson edged a snappy delivery from Kagiso Rabada to Van der Dussen at first slip.

Anderson and Broad were reckoned by some observers to have been fighting for one place in this match, but with both getting the nod it was a familiar attack that awaited South Africa.

The knowledge of what was coming did not help the Proteas in the early stages, however. Broad immediately found his range and had Pieter Malan and Zubayr Hamza caught in the slips, both men gone for five apiece with Root and Stokes holding the catches behind the bat.

When Anderson struck a huge blow by removing home captain Faf du Plessis for just one run - Stokes again taking the catch - England had South Africa on the rack.

England thought they had snared Van der Dussen when he was caught in a tangle by a tasty Anderson delivery, only for a review to show the batsman had managed an inside edge.

Van der Dussen had another life on 16 when Broad looked to have him caught behind, yet the England paceman had overstepped by a couple of inches, and the same batsman was dropped by Stokes.

Just when it looked like Elgar would go to three figures, he lost patience after half an hour of England stemming the flow of runs, took a big swing at Bess and Root snaffled a patient catch at deep mid-off.

Curran got in on the act, having Quinton de Kock caught at mid-off by Anderson and finally removing Van der Dussen, whose luck ran out on 68 when Stokes held a fine low catch down to his right.

Anderson accounted for Dwaine Pretorius, with Stokes redeeming himself for a drop at the start of the 81st over by gobbling up a chance off the Lancastrian three balls later, and Anderson's next strike made it marginally England's day.

South Africa all-rounder Dwaine Pretorius believes England are around 70 runs short of a par total after collapsing on day one of the second Test at Newlands.

The tourists, trailing the four-match series 1-0, slumped from 185-4 to 234-9 in the final session before Ollie Pope took them on to 262-9 at stumps with an unbeaten 56.

Ben Stokes (47) was among the England batsman who get themselves in but failed to go on after Joe Root had won the toss.

Pretorius, who took 2-26, thinks the Proteas are ahead of the game after reaping the rewards for some disciplined bowling. 

"It is very important to take wickets before the new ball. Because it makes the tail shorter and I am glad to contribute," said the 30-year-old.

"They had a lot of guys that got in today and then got out at the wrong times.

"I have not played much Test cricket but a par score would be about 350. So, I think they are about 70 runs short."

He added: "It was hard work getting wickets today but our discipline allowed us to get wickets at crucial times."

Vernon Philander, Kagiso Rabada and Anrich Nortje also chipped in with two wickets apiece as England's frailties were exposed yet again.

Ollie Pope is optimistic England can obtain a first-innings lead despite suffering another collapse on day one of the second Test against South Africa at Newlands.

The tourists were 185-4 after Joe Root won the toss in Cape Town, but slumped to 234-9 after losing five wickets for only 49 runs in Cape Town on Friday.

Pope ended a poor day for England - 1-0 down in the four-match series - with the bat on a positive note by making an unbeaten 56, taking the score on to 262-9 in an unbroken final-wicket stand of 28 with James Anderson.

The middle-order batsman was pleased to make a contribution on his return from illness a day after his 22nd birthday and hopes he and Anderson can continue to frustrate the Proteas before making inroads with the ball.

Pope told Sky Sports: "It's been a frustrating few weeks. Leading into that first Test, I couldn't have felt any better with the bat and then falling ill the day before was a bit of a nightmare.

"But I'm really happy from a personal point of view with how today went and hopefully we can get a few more tomorrow."

Ben Stokes (47) was among the England batsmen to gift his wicket tamely on the opening day, but Pope says the pitch also provided the South Africa bowlers with some assistance.

"It's a frustration but you look at some of the wickets, there's some good balls and I think the pitch has offered a little bit for the seamers and there is a bit of spin out there, so it was probably more a reflection of the pitch than how we played I think," he added.

"There's a little bit of inconsistent bounce. Rooty said to me before I went in to bat the short balls sometimes really don't get up, so it was a bit of a strange one, but I think when it does nip, it nips off the cracks, there are small bits of grass and that is where there is a bit of sideways movement for the seamers.

"It does look quite dry, I think [Keshav] Maharaj got a few to spin. It does look like it could break up a little bit, so hopefully we can get a first-innings lead and take advantage of that."

South Africa capitalised on England's batting frailties to take the upper hand in the second Test at Newlands, despite being frustrated by a defiant Ollie Pope late on day one.

The tourists had a great opportunity to show a positive response to losing the first Test at Centurion when Joe Root won the toss and opted to bat on a good track in Cape Town on Friday.

It was the Proteas' day, though, as England crumbled abjectly in the sun to close on 262-9, having been 185-4 prior to Ben Stokes playing a poor shot to depart for 47.

Pope was the only batsman to score a half-century on his return from illness a day after his 22nd birthday, making a mature unbeaten 56 with support from last man James Anderson in an unbroken last-wicket stand of 28.

Vernon Philander, Kagiso Rabada, Anrich Nortje and Dwaine Pretorius took two wickets apiece for a South Africa side aiming for a fifth successive win at the famous venue, a place where England have not secured victory for 63 years.

Philander (2-46) wasted no time in making an impact in his last Test on his home ground, Zak Crawley - in for the injured Rory Burns - edging behind in the third over.

Dom Sibley (34) found the rope seven times before he nicked Rabada (2-63) to a diving Quinton de Kock to end a second-wicket stand of 55 with Joe Denly just before lunch.

Denly was rattled on the helmet as Nortje tested him with some short stuff and Root (35) was undone by a hostile delivery from the same bowler, trudging off in fury after gloving the quick to wicketkeeper De Kock for 35 straight after he had been dropped in the slips.

Denly (38) fell seven overs later, Keshav Maharaj breaching his otherwise solid defence to bowl the number three and leave England in a spot of bother on 127-4.

Stokes looked in ominous touch on the ground where he made a career-best 258 four years ago as he and Pope attempted a rebuilding job, including clattering Maharaj into the crowd.

The all-rounder continued to play positively as Pope accumulated steadily, but Stokes gave his wicket away by tamely chipping Nortje (2-54) to Dean Elgar at cover in the final session.

Jos Buttler (29 from 27 balls) played in one-day mode and put Maharaj on the building site with a fierce blow before Pretorius (2-26) ended his promising knock.

Sam Curran lost his off stump offering no shot to Pretorius, then Philander got rid of Dom Bess – the spinner selected to replace the injured Jofra Archer in England's attack - for a golden duck with the first delivery with the second new ball, De Kock taking his fifth catch.

England were 234-9 when Stuart Broad got himself into an almighty tangle and was bowled by Rabada, but Pope ramped the paceman for two fours and farmed the strike impressively to make a second Test half-century.

The right-hander had a life when he was caught hooking Rabada as the paceman overstepped but while the final wicket proved to be elusive for South Africa prior to the close, they will be much the happier of the two sides.

Jofra Archer has been ruled out of the second Test between South Africa and England at Newlands through injury.

England fast bowler Archer has been unable to recover from an elbow complaint and must now be assessed with regards to his availability for the remainder of the four-match rubber.

The 24-year-old's absence compounds a relentless tale of woe for Joe Root's squad, which has been ravaged by illness for the majority of their tour so far.

One of the victims of the sickness bug, Ollie Pope, is back in after sitting out the opening defeat at Centurion, but England's top scorer in that game, Rory Burns, is out for the rest of the series due to an ankle injury sustained while playing football in training on Thursday.

It means a second Test cap and first as an opener for Kent youngster Zak Crawley, who will face up to the new ball on the first morning after Root won the toss and elected to bat.

Pieter Malan is a debutant at the top of the Proteas order, as expected, with Aiden Markram out for the remaining Tests due to a broken finger.

Faf du Plessis is approaching "a crossroad" in his career that could lead to him retiring from at least one format after the T20 World Cup. 

The South Africa captain will be 36 by the time of this year's tournament in Australia, which begins in October, and knows he may need to lighten the load.

Team-mate Vernon Philander, 34, is set to retire from international cricket after the ongoing four-Test series with England and that gave Du Plessis reason to reflect.

"I was the last one standing now with Vern [Vernon Philander] going from our generation," he said in a news conference.

"I said before that the T20 World Cup would be a crossroad in my career where I would see where I'm at.

"I think something will have to give from a format point of view. I don't know what this is yet.

"As a team probably if you look at the next year, Test cricket and T20 is probably our two main focus points. So possibly in the one-day game [we need to] start looking at guys who will get opportunities.

"I think it's important we do that more - get guys ready."

Du Plessis has played 62 Test matches, 143 ODIs and 44 T20 internationals ahead of the second five-day match with England, which starts on Friday.

Rory Burns will miss the rest of England's Test series against South Africa after sustaining an ankle injury during a football match in training.

Burns was hurt when he landed awkwardly during Thursday's session ahead of the Newlands Test and scans showed he has ligament damage in his left ankle.

In a statement confirming his injury, the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) said Burns "will return home for further assessment and treatment at the earliest convenience".

The opener made 93 runs across his two innings as England slipped to a 107-run loss at Centurion in the first Test.

England have been enduring a nightmare tour with 11 players struck down by illness, while Jofra Archer is a doubt to play in the second Test in Cape Town, which starts on Friday, due to an elbow injury.

Zak Crawley, who made his Test debut in the middle order on the losing tour of New Zealand at the end of 2019, appears likely to replace Burns as Dom Sibley's opening partner.

It is not the first time England have lost a player to an injury sustained playing football.

Jonny Bairstow - who is expected to make way for Ollie Pope at Newlands - hurt himself during such a game in 2018.

Rory Burns is a doubt for England's second Test with South Africa after injuring his ankle while playing football.

The opener was England's top scorer in the 107-run first-Test loss at Centurion and his absence would represent a huge blow to the tourists, who have also been struck by illness in the camp.

Burns is set to undergo a scan but faces a race to be fit for the Cape Town clash, which starts on Friday.

Should he fail to prove his fitness, Kent's Zak Crawley is likely to be drafted in, while England could also be without paceman Jofra Archer.

"Rory burns has an injured left ankle sustained in the warm-up playing football. He has gone for a scan. We will update further in due course," an England statement read.

"Jofra Archer will not train today [Thursday] at Newlands, suffering with right elbow soreness. We are awaiting the results of his scan.

"He remains a doubt for the second Test."

The circumstances in which Burns suffered his setback will put the practice of having kickabouts under scrutiny once more, with Jonny Bairstow having injured himself during such a game in 2018.

Pieter Malan will make his South Africa debut in the second Test against England, while Temba Bavuma has been dropped from the squad and challenged to score a "weight of runs" to earn a recall.

Malan will open the batting with Dean Elgar at Newlands after Aiden Markram was ruled out of the rest of the four-match series with a broken finger.

That is the only change to a Proteas side that won the first Test at Centurion, where Bavuma missed out on a 40th appearance in the longest format.

South Africa captain Faf du Plessis says his fellow batsman must pile on the runs to have any chance of forcing his way back into the team, with Rassie van der Dussen keeping his place.

Du Plessis said: "Temba is on board. Something we are trying to achieve as a batting unit is to raise our standards a little bit higher, push our performances from a runs point of view. He is on board with the process to try and get guys to score big runs.

"If you're not finding yourself starting now, it's about weight of runs. Temba was injured before the start of the series but it was a talking point even before the series - whose positions do we need to make sure there is more competition for?

"It's about finding guys that are knocking on the door all the time to push us to a level where we can take this batting line-up to win games of cricket consistently.

"Temba will be the first to say that his performance over the last while wasn't where it needed to be. Weight of runs would be the way back into the team, like it would for anyone."

Du Plessis says Van der Dussen earned another opportunity after making a half-century on his debut in the first Test.

"We feel it's the right thing to do to stick with Rassie," the skipper added ahead of the second Test, which starts on Friday.

"As a player, you feel like you get a bit confidence when you get an extended run - runs or no runs. Luckily he scored some runs in the first Test.

"A big part of international cricket is the mental aspect of belonging. Rassie has got a real composure to him and a presence when he bats. He ticks all the right boxes."

England will leave it late to make a decision on Jofra Archer's fitness, while Mark Wood and Jack Leach have been ruled out of the second Test against South Africa at Newlands.

Archer has been struggling with an elbow injury and the paceman is a doubt for the match in Cape Town, which starts on Friday.

Spinner Leach is not ready for a recall after being badly affected by the sickness bug that has swept through the camp and fast bowler Wood is still recovering from side and knee problems.

Captain Joe Root said when asked about Archer's availability: "It will be another late call.

"Not knowing exactly how Jofra is might change how we balance the side up.

"I think it's a recurring injury and he's had it before. He did pull up very sore [on Wednesday] and seemed to be in a little pain."

The Proteas lead the four-match series 1-0 after securing a 109-run victory at Centurion.

Given the two T20 World Cups under the belt of the West Indies, it may be no surprise that the Caribbean side has dominated ESPN’s best XI in the format over the last decade.

ESPN had come up with a list of its best XI in Test, One-Day and T20 Internationals and while there were no West Indians in the two longer formats of the game, they may have made up for it in the shortest.

At the top of the order comes Chris Gayle, T20’s all-time leading run-scorer. Interestingly, the opening spots have been covered by the West Indies with Sunil Narine earning a pick for his innovative pinch-hitting at the top of the order.

India’s Virat Kohli comes at number three in the batting line-up, with South Africa’s AB de Villiers locking down number four.

At five, ESPN has gone with another Indian in veteran Mahendra Singh Doni before turning again to the Caribbean where West Indies white-ball captain Kieron Pollard and Andre Russell can decide who bats six and seven.

At number eight, the best in the world this decade, according to the writers at ESPN, comes Dwayne Bravo before the leg-spin option of Rashid Khan. Narine, is, of course, the other spinner in the side.

Sri Lankan great, Lasith Malinga makes the best team of the decade next, while Jasprith Bumrah finds his way into the side as the second seamer. The two are seen as the best death bowlers in the world because of their ability to bowl Yorkers.

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