Jos Buttler has been fined 15 per cent of his match fee for a sweary outburst at Vernon Philander during England's victory over South Africa in the second Test at Newlands.

Buttler was heard hurling expletives at the Proteas all-rounder on the final day of the tourists' 189-run series-levelling triumph in Cape Town.

The England wicketkeeper-batsman was found guilty of breaching Level 1 of the ICC Code of Conduct.

Buttler was also ruled to have breached Article 2.3 of the Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel, which relates to “use of an audible obscenity during an international match”. 

The third match of the series gets under way in Port Elizabeth next Thursday.

Dom Bess does not mind if other England bowlers like Ben Stokes take the plaudits after saying it was "unbelievable" to be part of the second Test victory over South Africa.

Stokes took the final three wickets in Cape Town as South Africa fell half an hour short of batting through day five to secure a draw that would have kept them ahead in the four-match series.

Instead, it is intriguingly poised at 1-1 and Bess does not mind that his 60 overs in the match, which went for an economical 1.98, produced just two wickets.

"It was all about trying to build up sustained pressure and I think especially in the first innings that was key," Bess told reporters.

"I could be a little bit more attacking in the second dig, but even then there wasn't a huge amount on offer from the straight.

"I'm happy bowling at one end, not picking up wickets and letting the boys do it at the other end. It is unbelievable to be a part of."

He added: "It was about putting the ball in the right place, and I got a couple of balls to bounce and take the inside edge and create chances. Some days they go to hand and some days they don't.

"When you've got guys like Stokesy at the other end and Jimmy [Anderson] and Broady [Stuart Broad] then it is phenomenal.

"I'm really happy with how I went here because I felt like I built up pressure and produced chances along the way.

"I'd love to be taking four or five wickets and being the man, but if I am producing consistently then that will come another day."

Bess played after Somerset team-mate Jack Leach was one of a host of England players to struggle with illness on the tour.

Leach may be back for next week's third Test in Port Elizabeth but Bess hopes he can hold on to the spot.

"I've got to focus on next week at PE and whether I play or not," added the 22-year-old. "I completely understand if Leachy plays, but hopefully I've put myself in a position to play.

"It has been a hell of a ride. I played the Test matches in 2018 and did alright, but then fell off the radar a little bit, and within myself I lost a lot of confidence within my game.

"Over the last two years, I've just been gradually building that back up."

James Anderson will miss the remainder of England's Test series against South Africa due to a rib injury.

Anderson, the tourists' all-time leading Test wicket-taker, sustained the damage to his left rib during day five of England's victory in the second Test at Newlands.

The 37-year-old could only bowl eight overs as England strived to level the series in Cape Town and he will play no part in the matches in Port Elizabeth and Johannesburg.

 

England director of cricket Ashley Giles has declared five-day Tests a "precious" part of the game, as the global players' union warned dropping a day could lead to "significant resistance".

The prospect of introducing four-day Tests will be discussed by the International Cricket Council (ICC) in the near future, and South Africa has said it would welcome the move.

Although the England and Wales Cricket Board has said it is "cautiously" backing the concept of the shortened matches, it has recognised it is an "emotive" issue.

Giles may have a greater passion for Test cricket than many of the sport's administrators, having been a Test spinner for England before moving into coaching and management.

Speaking on BBC Radio 5 Live on Wednesday, Giles said: "Anything that helps players and their workloads is good to look at, and anything that takes the game forward is good to look at. But I played Test cricket, I love Test cricket, and if we played four-day cricket I feel we would miss out on a lot of matches like yesterday."

That was a reference to England's gripping fifth-day success in bowling out South Africa in Cape Town to win the second Test on Tuesday and level their series.

"I know a lot of Test matches these days don't go to the fifth day, but it is precious to me certainly and I know it is to the players," Giles said.

"I think it's important we look at everything. But I think it's a decision far from made yet.

"It is our responsibility as guardians of game in this country to look at everything that can both take the game forward and look at the workloads of our players."

The Federation of International Cricketers' Associations (FICA) has gathered early reaction from far and wide, and issued its response to the growing debate by underlining the concerns of players.

The likes of former Australia captain Ricky Ponting and India great Sachin Tendulkar have already expressed opposition to the idea.

FICA executive chairman Tony Irish said: "From our discussions with players around the world, and our global survey data, it is clear that there is currently a lot of negative sentiment, within the global collective of players, towards such a significant change to the game's most traditional format."

That could hardly have been more blunt, with Irish's statement on FICA's website going on to stress the ICC and national boards must be open about their intentions and motivations, and how cricket might benefit.

"Making a fundamental change simply in order to provide calendar space to fill with additional or meaningless cricket is clearly not something we can support. Cricket's global structure desperately needs clarity, rather than further confusion," Irish said.

"Until such a time as we and the players are provided with the full picture and compelling reasons for change, we remain supportive of five-day Test cricket, and would expect significant player resistance if a shift to that is imposed on players by the ICC and/or boards.

"Test cricket is a cherished format of the game and it needs player support and buy in to survive. We urge those making decisions to understand that."

James Anderson was heading for a scan amid a fresh fitness worry on Wednesday, with England team director Ashley Giles saying it "would be desperate" for the veteran to face a new lay-off.

England's record wicket-taker in Test cricket was barely involved with the ball after lunch on day five of the second Test against South Africa in Cape Town.

The tourists won by 189 runs, with Ben Stokes stepping up to take the last three wickets in dramatic fashion.

Concern over an apparent side strain for 37-year-old Anderson was expressed once the match was over, and Giles said on Wednesday morning: "Jimmy will have to have a scan today which we've got all fingers crossed for.

"It would be desperate if Jim is injured again. He's worked so hard to get back in the team."

Anderson has reclaimed his place in the England side following a calf injury, which forced him to miss all but the opening morning of the Ashes Tests against Australia last year.

He took five South African wickets in the first innings at Newlands, and removed two batsmen second time around before being forced out of the attack.

It remains to be seen whether he will be fit for the third Test, which starts in Port Elizabeth on January 16.

"We certainly don't think it's a recurrence of his previous injury," Giles said on BBC Radio 5 Live.

"He bowled like a demon in that first innings. That mix of youth and experience we have in the team is just so valuable and he's been such a great servant. We're holding our breath and fingers crossed for him."

Anderson at least appeared to be in good spirits on Wednesday, as he wrote on Twitter: "What a start to 2020! Every man played their part in a fantastic win. Victory always tastes sweeter when you have to graft into the last hour on day 5!"

South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was gutted to lose to England at Newlands but acknowledged they had been part of a magnificent spectacle in the second Test.

A dramatic final day saw the Proteas come within half an hour of batting out the day to secure a draw, but instead, Ben Stokes took the final three wickets in quick succession as England levelled the four-match series at 1-1.

Du Plessis felt the contest was exactly why the ICC should not reduce Tests to four days as he reflected on a tough loss for his team.

"What an advertisement for Test cricket," he said. "Obviously I'm sad that we are on the losing side, but all I'm asking for from a team-mate is that we fought and fought really hard. 

"We did that over five days. Most teams would come when the chips are down and fall after lunch, so for me this was a huge step in the right direction, showing character and fight. We lost in the right way, we fought to the end, and I'm proud of that. 

"I am a fan of Test cricket going five days. The great draws of the game go five days. I understand there is a lot of money being burnt on day-five cricket because a lot of Test matches are not going five days. 

"But I am still a purist of the game because I have been part of some great draws and this is no different. There would definitely not have been a result in four days on this pitch.

"That's what makes it special, to have Stokes, shattered and still running in and we are trying to survive. That's what makes the extra day so special.

"Unfortunately, there has to be a winner and a loser, and credit for England for having just a little bit more in the tank than we had. [Quinton de Kock] was going really well and we felt he had it under control."

The third Test in Port Elizabeth will start on January 16.

Du Plessis added: "The next Test will be very exciting. Luckily there's a bit of a break after two tough matches in a row. 

"Regroup, train harder and make sure we improve – that's what we're trying to do as a young unit and I think that's what you see.

"Two months ago, we were very weak mentally. We exploded quickly. Sometimes you will improve by losing."

Asked where the game was lost for South Africa, Du Plessis felt their opening total of 223 had proven costly.

"First-innings runs," he said. "We got ourselves into a position where we should have got a little bit more. We are not where we need to be from a batting point of view.

"But what pleases me is that we've found someone at the top of the order in Pieter Malan. He knows his game and has stepped in and played one of the great innings. We've shown we've got another opener who can play Test cricket."

Ben Stokes was driven by a desire to make his father proud as he shrugged off injury niggles to inspire England to a dramatic final-day victory over South Africa in the second Test at Newlands.

England prevailed by a comfortable-looking margin of 189 runs, but only after vice-captain Stokes - whose dad, Ged, was hospitalised in Johannesburg with a serious illness on December 23 - claimed three wickets in the last hour of play to extinguish the hosts' hopes of salvaging a draw.

With attack leader James Anderson hampered by an apparent side problem, Stokes stepped up with a stunning spell of 3-1 from 4.4 overs, dismissing Dwaine Pretorius, Anrich Nortje and Vernon Philander in quick succession.

The all-rounder's brilliant burst rounded off a superb individual display. After making 47 in England's first innings, he took five catches in South Africa's reply and then gave the tourists crucial additional time to chase victory by blasting 72 from 47 balls.

After his latest match-winning heroics, Stokes - the hero of his country's Cricket World Cup win and Headingley Ashes victory last year - said his father, who spent several days in intensive care following his admission to hospital, had been in his thoughts throughout.

"I don't want to get into it too much, but obviously with everything that's happened with my dad and stuff like that, you have a bit more inside of you and the niggles and the injuries and stuff like that just sort of go," Stokes told Sky Sports.

"I know I always wear this shirt with the most amount of pride that I possibly can running into bowl, but there was a bit more there for me this week.

"And you know, bad knee, bad side or whatever it was, I always had my dad in the back of my mind, thinking about where he was. I haven't managed to speak to him tonight but I hope I've made him proud."

England's win levelled the four-match series at 1-1 ahead of next week's third Test in Port Elizabeth.

Stuart Broad lauded England's character after they beat South Africa in the second Test at Newlands to level the four-match series at 1-1.

The tourists started the day needing eight wickets to seal victory but they were frustrated by Pieter Malan (84) and Quinton de Kock (50) in Cape Town.

England still needed five wickets in the final session, and their all-time leading wicket taker James Anderson bowled only two overs after lunch amid fears of another injury.

However, De Kock holed out to a senseless shot off Joe Denly before Ben Stokes (3-53) finished off the tail as England won by 189 runs inside the final hour.

"[It is] very special, the crowd has been exceptional today, it's been an incredible day's play and a great Test match," Broad said.

"We had to work incredibly hard, we knew we were going to do that from yesterday's play.

"Incredible discipline from South Africa throughout the day but we kept saying all the time, 'One bit of magic', tried some funky fields, one breakthrough and we can apply some pressure. Fortunately we got that.

"On pitches like that, you need a bit of luck chasing 10 wickets and then you need a hell of a lot of character and skill.

"Stokesy finishing with the catching towards the end is something we've worked a lot towards.

"We're very proud of the character we showed throughout the Test match."

Stokes' all-round performance was once again key, the 28-year-old's 47-ball 72 allowing England to declare on 391-8 in their second innings.

His innings had come alongside maiden centurion Dom Sibley, who was elated his unbeaten 133 eventually came in a winning cause.

"Amazing win. Amazing atmosphere as well - it felt like a home game at the end," Sibley added.

"We were a bit flat but things changed quickly. Stokesy turned it on and produced a hell of a spell.

"I've lost two [Tests] and drawn one so it's nice to get a win on the board. To do it in that manner was amazing.

"It's nice to get the win and nice to have contributed. An amazing feeling and hopefully it continues."

Ben Stokes was England's hero once again as England took five wickets in the final session to win a thrilling second Test against South Africa in Cape Town that levelled the series at 1-1.

The tourists won by 189 runs, claiming the 10th wicket in the Proteas' second innings with just over half an hour left to play on day five, as Stokes, who had previously shone with the bat, took the last three wickets in dramatic fashion.

With 26 overs remaining, it looked like the hosts would bat out the day for a draw with Quinton de Kock and Rassie van der Dussen well set and their team on 237-5

But De Kock fell for 50 after a poor shot off Joe Denly before Van der Dussen's 194-minute, 140-ball innings for just 17 ended tamely when he was caught off Stuart Broad down the legside. 

Debutant Pieter Malan made 84 after surviving for 288 deliveries, but Stokes helped England prevail and gave coach Chris Silverwood his first Test win in four attempts despite largely being without the injured James Anderson after lunch.

There are two more Tests to come in the four-match series, with the next contest in Port Elizabeth starting on January 16.

Starting the day on 126-2, Keshav Maharaj soon fell for two in the third over, Anderson dismissing him plumb lbw, with the nightwatchman not even waiting for the umpire's finger.

That brought Proteas captain Faf du Plessis to the crease for what the hosts hoped would be a match-saving partnership with Malan.

The skipper, so often his side's final-innings hero, moved on to 19 but got out in poor fashion, giving his wicket away poorly when he swept straight to Denly at square leg off Dom Bess.

That meant South Africa were four down at lunch and the crucial wicket of Malan early in the second session, Sam Curran forcing an edge to second slip where Stokes was waiting gratefully, appeared to have the tourists in control.

The hosts desperately needed a partnership and it arrived through De Kock and Van der Dussen, who managed well as the 32 overs after lunch went for just 55 runs and one wicket.

But just as it looked like South Africa were comfortable, De Kock, who brought up his fifty with a four off Curran, could not believe what he had done when he sent a long hop from Denly straight to Zak Crawley.

England then saw a field change pay immediate dividends, Anderson catching Van der Dussen at leg gully before Stokes (3-35) found the edge of Dwaine Pretorius with captain Joe Root taking a smart catch at slip.

Anrich Nortje went for a golden duck next ball, Crawley keeping his cool in the slips to make the catch at the second attempt while on the ground.

And Vernon Philander was the last man to fall as he fended Stokes to gully, ending the retiring star's attempt to see South Africa through to the close at his home stadium.

England batsman Dom Sibley revelled in "one of the best days of my life" after making a maiden Test century on day four of the Cape Town contest against South Africa.

Sibley put England in a commanding position against the Proteas with an unbeaten 133 as the tourists declared on 391-8, setting the home team a target of 438.

The Warwickshire man was playing just his fourth Test as he steered England towards victory, with the Proteas still 312 runs shy of victory heading into day five.

"It's probably one of the best days of my life," Sibley told Sky Sports. "I was a bit nervy on 95 when I nicked one off [Kagiso] Rabada and luckily turned around and saw it race away to the rope.

"It was nice to get one away off [Keshav] Maharaj and a nice big celebration."

The opener is now hopeful he can add further "addictive" tons in the remainder of the series, with England eight wickets away from winning the Test and drawing level in South Africa.

"Your first one makes you feel like you can do it here - especially against a really good attack," he said. "I just want to keep doing it, to be honest.

"That feeling was pretty addictive today, with the way the crowd was. It doesn't mean I'm going to rest on my laurels. I'll train hard and hopefully have another couple in this series."

Sibley was feeling the pressure overnight as he sat on 85, but Ben Stokes, a new partner on Monday morning, was in destructive mood - making 72 off 47 - to aid his team-mate.

The centurion added at a news conference: "I slept terribly, to be honest. I was up at like 2am, watching TV, thinking about the 15 runs.

"It feels amazing right now. I'm just glad that I got over the line.

"I think [Stokes] took the pressure off me, made it really easy to just go at my own tempo. He kept saying to me, 'Don't change what you're doing, just play the way you play'.

"So when he was whacking it everywhere and I was nurdling it around and playing and missing and stuff, it was nice that, at the other end, he was doing the scoring. I could just go about it in my own way."

Dean Elgar was again frustrated by his dismissal in the Cape Town Test against England, the opener this time unhappy with the Ultra-Edge technology that saw him fall to Joe Denly on day four.

The South Africa batsman had openly acknowledged his error in the first innings when his key wicket went to Dom Bess, but he felt unfairly treated in his second stint with the bat.

The Proteas were steadily chipping away at a target of 438, 71 without loss, when Elgar was given out to Denly having edged behind to Jos Buttler.

Elgar was adamant there was no contact, however, even as Ultra-Edge showed a tiny spike when the ball passed his bat, costing his team a review.

Asked if he hit the ball after South Africa reached stumps on 126-2, Elgar told Sky Sports: "No. I wouldn't waste the referral knowing that I've nicked it.

"I don't play cricket like that. I like to see myself as someone who takes the out if I'm definitely out. Like I say, I wouldn't waste it on that.

"It's a bit of an emotional time when those kinds of things happen. Obviously, I had to simmer down and, watching the footage, I could still say I didn't hit it."

On Ultra-Edge, Elgar added: "Please don't [get me a fine]. I don't know.

"I think I'm just going to reserve my comments, because I obviously don't want to get in trouble with the ICC. As a player, I can say I'm very confident I didn't nick it.

"Our coach also alluded to [the elbow hitting the pad on Ultra-Edge]. It is what it is, and so be it. It's what creates the theatre of Test cricket, I suppose.

"Sometimes you have those things go your way, and sometimes you don't. Unfortunately, today, feeling a million dollars, it just didn't work out for us. But we've still got guys in the shed."

Despite Elgar's frustration, South Africa remain in the Test match, 312 runs short of victory with eight wickets remaining heading into the final day.

"I think it's ball by ball at the moment," Elgar said. "We've got 540 balls and we're going to try to break it up per batsman.

"We just need two or three guys to come in and really grind it out. We've got batters in the shed who can do it, and the wicket's playing quite nicely. You've just got to start well on this wicket."

England opener Dom Sibley scored an unbeaten first Test century as England set South Africa the target of 438 on day four in Cape Town, a task the hosts quickly set about.

The standout performer of the second Test, Sibley finished on 133 from 311 balls as England declared on 391-8 in the second innings, giving their bowlers a day and a half to get the Proteas out.

But early progress was slow with the ball and, led by debutant Pieter Malan (63 not out), South Africa reached stumps still very much in the match on 126-2.

Ben Stokes had accelerated the tourists' innings with an explosive 72 off 47 in a partnership of 92 with Sibley, arriving at the beginning of the day with England already 264 runs in front.

Stokes' highest Test score came at Newlands in 2016, and he appeared in the mood for more of the same on Monday, quickly plundering boundaries as Sibley held his ground at the opposite end.

The star all-rounder mustered seven fours and three sixes in all as he raced past fifty before Sibley finally reached his patient 269-ball century with a sweep through backward square to the fence.

Stokes looked destined to join his team-mate on three figures in double-quick time, but he could not beat Rassie van der Dussen at long-on, caught off Keshav Maharaj's bowling.

Ollie Pope (3) quickly departed, and Jos Buttler joined Sibley and made 23 off 18. Sam Curran added 13, before England declared with Stuart Broad in the middle.

But South Africa started off fairly comfortably in reply, openers Malan and Dean Elgar only belatedly put under a little pressure in a Joe Denly spell shortly before tea.

Denly (1-26) returned following the interval and tempted a thin edge from Elgar (34) for a much-needed breakthrough the batsman unsuccessfully reviewed.

England soon grew frustrated again, though, as Malan paired with Zubayr Hamza (18) and brought up his first Test fifty, and James Anderson was sent in for a last tilt at the resolute pair.

That change did the trick, Hamza edging Anderson (1-18) behind in the second of the veteran's consecutive maiden overs, leaving the tourists eight wickets short of a series-levelling victory.

Dean Elgar described his dismissal to Dom Bess as a "brainfart" after South Africa collapsed on day two of the second Test against England at Newlands. 

The opener and Rassie van der Dussen put on 117 for the fourth wicket after the Proteas slumped to 40-3 in reply to the tourists' 269 all out, but Elgar threw his wicket away with a century in sight.

Left-hander Elgar appeared to lose his patience on 88 with a big swing at spinner Bess and was caught by England captain Joe Root at mid-off.

England fought back superbly in the final session, James Anderson taking 3-34 as South Africa were reduced to 215-8 - trailing by 5 runs at the close on Saturday.

"It was [about] trying to be as patient as possible," Elgar told a news conference of his approach alongside Van der Dussen, who made 68. "If he overpitches it, try to hit the ball to long-on. It was pretty much as easy as that.

"I felt I played him very well until the brainfart - and then I was sat in the changing room. That's all it is.

"[It was] a big one. I don't think it was anything to do with the patience factor. I might have just chosen the wrong ball to do what I wanted to do.

"A few overs ago, I hit him for four. It's a great shot, isn't it? And now you choose the wrong ball, and that's pretty much all she wrote."

Elgar was apologetic for his dismissal, adding: "It's actually not right of me playing shots like that, especially being a senior batter. I shouldn't be putting other guys under pressure like that.

"But I'm also a human being - I'm allowed to make mistakes. I've got two arms, two legs and another thing, so I'm allowed to."

Elgar acknowledged England are now on top, with Keshav Maharaj dismissed with what proved to be the final ball of the day from Anderson..

"I would say, after the last hour, they've potentially got one foot ahead of us," Elgar said. "It's difficult to look into the future of this game.

"We know we've got a good battle coming up tomorrow with the ball in hand."

Sam Curran said England must dismiss South Africa early on day three and "bat big" after Ben Stokes' catches and a fired-up pace attack gave them the edge in the second Test at Newlands.

Curran and Stuart Broad took two wickets apiece on Saturday, while James Anderson claimed 3-34 to leave the Proteas 215-8 at stumps in reply to the tourists' 269 all out, having been 157-3 shortly after tea.

Stokes took four slip catches and put down two other chances, leaving him one away from becoming the first England fielder, excluding wicketkeepers, to grab five in a Test innings.

South Africa trail by 54 runs and Curran says England must take command on Sunday as they strive to level the four-match series at 1-1.

"What a way to finish the day. Hopefully we can get a lead," Curran told Sky Sports.

"We're in a good position. Hopefully we can get those two wickets in the morning and bat big."

Dean Elgar (88) and Rassie van der Dussen (68) were looking like giving the hosts a platform to build a big lead, the latter capitalising on being given a reprieve when he edged behind on 16, but Broad overstepped.

Spinner Dom Bess bowled 27 overs, foraging for an opening before he claimed the crucial fourth-wicket breakthrough, drawing Elgar into a hoik that found the safe hands of Joe Root.

"Bessy did an amazing job. There's not much for the seamers and not much for Bessy," Curran said.

"That is a flat wicket but at the same time there is a channel that we're trying to hit. It's about being as patient as possible and every now and again there's something there."

James Anderson and Stuart Broad led the way as England dug themselves out of trouble in the second Test at Newlands - with Ben Stokes on the brink of a record.

After being bowled out for 269 in their first innings, England allowed South Africa to recover from a vulnerable 40-3 as Dean Elgar and Rassie van der Dussen piled on 117 for the fourth wicket.

But a rush of five wickets after tea allowed England to reassert themselves in the contest, South Africa ending day two in Cape Town on 215-8 and thoroughly rattled.

Stokes' four catches in the innings put him one short of becoming the first English fielder - other than wicketkeepers - to take five in a Test innings.

The day's play ended with Anderson's third wicket as he had Keshav Maharaj caught by Dom Sibley at third slip.

Anderson's 3-34, Broad's 2-36 and Sam Curran's 2-39 showed up South Africa's limitations against England's seam attack, while heavily-worked spinner Dom Bess took the key wicket of Dean Elgar, who made 88 before skying one to the tourists' captain, Joe Root.

England, on 262-9 overnight, predictably did not go much further, adding only seven runs before Anderson edged a snappy delivery from Kagiso Rabada to Van der Dussen at first slip.

Anderson and Broad were reckoned by some observers to have been fighting for one place in this match, but with both getting the nod it was a familiar attack that awaited South Africa.

The knowledge of what was coming did not help the Proteas in the early stages, however. Broad immediately found his range and had Pieter Malan and Zubayr Hamza caught in the slips, both men gone for five apiece with Root and Stokes holding the catches behind the bat.

When Anderson struck a huge blow by removing home captain Faf du Plessis for just one run - Stokes again taking the catch - England had South Africa on the rack.

England thought they had snared Van der Dussen when he was caught in a tangle by a tasty Anderson delivery, only for a review to show the batsman had managed an inside edge.

Van der Dussen had another life on 16 when Broad looked to have him caught behind, yet the England paceman had overstepped by a couple of inches, and the same batsman was dropped by Stokes.

Just when it looked like Elgar would go to three figures, he lost patience after half an hour of England stemming the flow of runs, took a big swing at Bess and Root snaffled a patient catch at deep mid-off.

Curran got in on the act, having Quinton de Kock caught at mid-off by Anderson and finally removing Van der Dussen, whose luck ran out on 68 when Stokes held a fine low catch down to his right.

Anderson accounted for Dwaine Pretorius, with Stokes redeeming himself for a drop at the start of the 81st over by gobbling up a chance off the Lancastrian three balls later, and Anderson's next strike made it marginally England's day.

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