Jamaica’s female sprinters lived up to the billing of favourites in the 4x100 relay at the IAAF World Championships of Athletics in Doha, Qatar on Saturday despite missing double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson among their ranks.

Jamaica’s 4x100-metre relay team at the IAAF World Championships of Athletics in Doha, Qatar, are the quickest through to the final of the event after Friday’s heats.

Decorated multi Olympic and World Championship gold medallist Allyson Felix has hailed Jamaican star Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce as an inspiration following her exploits at the Doha Championships.

Fraser-Pryce claimed a fourth World Championship 100m title after dismantling a quality field, once again ascending to an all too familiar top spot on the podium.  This time around, however, the journey to the gold medal was a different one for Fraser-Pryce. 

It’s difficult to imagine that just two years ago Fraser-Pryce, then an expectant mother, watched the World Championships from the comfort of her living room.  That she has been able to not only recover to compete at the highest level but claim gold in a time just outside of her personal best is a remarkable set of circumstances in and of itself.  For Felix, on a difficult journey of her own after having her first child, the Jamaican serves as a source of inspiration to female athletes everywhere.

“She’s amazing.  She is my friend.  She has helped me along this journey, and we encourage each other.  I am so happy for her and very encouraged for myself,” Felix told Nuffin Long Athletics.

“Everyone’s situation is going to be different, but she shows that it’s possible.  I think more than anything she is an inspiration.”

Felix, who had her daughter Camryn in November of last year, was a part of the United States squad for the World Championship but only managed to secure a place as a member of the relay team.  The six-time Olympic and 12-time World Championship gold medallist, however, has plans to be back in top shape in time for next year’s Olympic Games.

Newly-crowned 100m World Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has offered kind words of encouragement to young compatriot Briana Williams who missed out on an appearance at the Doha Championships after being embroiled in a doping controversy.

The 17-year-old Williams was hit with a reprimand after returning an adverse analytical finding, following the Jamaica National Championships.  The athlete, who returned a test for the banned diuretic Hydrochlorothiazide, provided the explanation that the substance was part of a contaminated batch of flu medication she had ingested on the morning of the championships. 

An Independent Anti-Doping Disciplinary Panel ruling on the matter issued Williams with a reprimand and did not prescribe any period of ineligibility for the athlete but based on the IAAF’s rules the results earned at Jamaica’s National Trials were scrubbed from the record. Williams had secured her spot on the World Championship team after finishing third behind Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson in the 100m.  Though selected to the team the athlete later withdrew after being replaced by Jonielle Smith for the 100m and facing time considerations for the relay squad.

“I’ve been in that situation before when I took a painkiller and it was very hard for me to come back and not focus on that incident,” Fraser-Pryce said.

In 2010, Fraser-Pryce served a six-month ban after testing positive for Oxycodone at the Shanghai Diamond League meeting.  The athlete had taken the substance to provide relief for a severe toothache.

“It happens, unfortunately.  I would not have wished that on anyone, and I hope that she can stay strong and stay motivated and forget about what anyone else has to say.  It’s about what you know and what you believe, and you can come back from anything.”

Four-time world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has targeted becoming a member of the exclusive 10.6s club by next year’s Tokyo Olympic Games.


The 32-year-old once again proved to be the woman to beat after obliterating the field to claim the women’s 100m title at the Doha World Championships on Sunday. The medal was Fraser-Pryce’s 8th World Championships gold overall, adding to two Olympic medals to make for one of the most impressive tallies of all-time.


Fraser-Pryce’s blistering burst of 10.71, was remarkably the sixth time the athlete has recorded a time in that range at a major championship. The exception came in 2016 when she lost to compatriot Elaine Thompson at the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. For the athlete, who seems to have made the art of peaking at the right time an exact science, the achievement was even more special this time around, having come back to the sport after having her first child. It’s hard to imagine that just two years ago she watched the London World Championships from her living room couch.


With a combined 16 medals at the Olympic and World Championship level it hard to imagine something missing from such a stellar CV but there remains an achievement that continues to elude the diminutive Jamaican champion.

Despite her personal best of 10.70 being just on the cusp of cracking the 10.6 barrier it remains a bridge the athlete is yet to cross. So far, it is a feat that has been achieved by three women in history, Florence Griffith-Joyner (10.49), Carmelita Jeter (10.64) and Marion Jones (10.65), all Americans.


“I definitely think I have a 10.6 within me. I don’t know why it’s still within me but we are working on it and we have 10 months to go until Tokyo so hopefully, we can get it together,” Fraser-Pryce said.

“My coach did say earlier that he believes I’m not fully back. So, we are working on it,” she added.


Despite not yet managing to achieve the mark, the athlete insisted that she took comfort in maintaining such a high level for such a long period and hoped to continue inspiring future generations.


“The only Championship that I’ve not managed to run a 10.7 is the Rio Olympics and for me this longevity is a major plus. It’s just my hope that young athletes that are coming up can understand that you have time and it can happen. You can do well even after a number of years."