An aggressive, attack-oriented batman and penetrative spin bowler, Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi could turn a match with either bat or ball. Out of the seven fastest ODI centuries of all time, Afridi has produced three of them.

Throughout his career, he had an ODI strike rate of 117 runs per 100 balls, the third-highest in the game's history. He is known for hitting long sixes, while his trademark shot is a cross-batted flick to the leg-side to a ball outside off stump.

As a bowler, his stock ball was the leg break but his armoury also includes the googly and a "quicker one" which he can deliver in the style of a medium-pacer, reaching speeds of around 130 km/h (81 mph).

At the 2007 World Twenty20, he performed poorly with the bat but brilliantly with the ball, earning the Man of the Series award, though he failed to take a wicket in the final and was out for a golden duck.

He also became the first person to receive the Player of the Tournament award in T20 World Cup history. But in the next ICC Twenty20 World Cup, held in 2009 Afridi performed brilliantly in the series scoring 50 runs in the semi-final and 54 in the final and leading his team to victory.

At the 2009 ICC World T20 final versus Sri Lanka at Lord's, he set several all-round records. He became the first player to score a fifty in a successful run chase in a World T20 final. He also became the first player to score a fifty and to take at least a single wicket in a World T20 final.

He also became the only player to win both the Player of the Final (2009) and the Player of the tournament awards in ICC World T20 history.

 

Career statistics (2004-present)

Full name: Sahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi

Born: March 1, 1980, (40) Khyber Agency

Major teams: Pakistan, Asia XI, Brampton Wolves, Deccan Chargers, Dhaka Gladiators, Dhaka Platoon, Edmonton Royals, Fly Emirates XI, Griqualand West, Habib Bank Limited, Hampshire, ICC World XI, Jamaica Tallawahs, Karachi, Karachi Kings, Karachi Region Blues, Kowloon Cantons, Leicestershire, Melbourne Renegades, Multan Sultans, Northamptonshire, Peshawar Zalmi, Rangpur Riders, Ruhuna Royals, South Australia, St Kitts and Nevis Patriots.

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Legbreak googly

 

T20I Career (Pakistan) Batting

Mat       Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50           4s         6s          

99           91          12          1416      54*        17.92     944        150.00          0          4           103        73          

T20 Career Batting

Mat      Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50           4s               6s          

317       271        38           4310      101        18.49     2801      153.87           1           9          320             245     

 

T20I Career Bowling

Mat       Inns        Balls       Runs      Wkts      BBI         BBM      Ave        Econ      SR           4w        5w          10w

99           97         2168        2396        98         4/11       4/11       24.44      6.63      22.1          3            0             0

 

T20 Career Bowling

Mat       Inns      Balls      Runs      Wkts      BBI         BBM      Ave        Econ      SR           4w           5w          10w

317        311        6742      7547       339        5/7         5/7       22.26       6.71      19.8           9             2             0

 

Career Highlights

  • Most T20 WC scalps (39)
  • 2007 T20 WC player of the tournament
  • 3 4-wicket hauls in T20I
  • Made 1416 T20I runs at an average of 17.92
  • Secured 98 T20I wickets at 24.45
  • Most T20I balls bowled (2168)
  • 4310 T20 runs at 18.49

He mixed it up by bowling googlies and the quicker ones. On occasion, he even delivered the conventional off-break. This was interspersed with some stunning knocks such as the one against India in 2005 when he got to his hundred in 45 balls.

This lethal combination made him one of the most valuable players going around in the shorter forms of the game.

That big-hitting potential may have caused people, even ones with more trained eyes, to underscore just how good a bowler Shahid Afridi was. Only Chaminda Vaas has ever produced better figures in an ODI game, his 7-12 against the West Indies in 2013 routing the hosts in Providence, Guyana for 98. This was, of course, after Afridi had propped up a poor batting performance from Pakistan with a typically aggressive 76 from 55 deliveries. Pakistan won the game by 126 runs and Afridi was duly named man of the match.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Sahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi

Born: 1 March 1975 (age 45), Khyber, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Height: 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm leg spin

Playing role: All-rounder

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1996–2018)

Mat    Inns      Balls       Runs       Wkts     BBI     BBM    Ave    Econ    SR      4w    5w     10w

398     372       17670     13632       395       7/12    7/12    34.51  4.62    44.7     4        9         0

 

Career Highlights

  • 2nd player in ODI history with 6,000 runs and 300 wickets
  • Joint leading wicket-taker in 2011 World Cup (21)
  • Most wickets in any World Cup by a captain (21)
  • 3rd most wickets by a Pakistani in ODIs (395)

Afridi is well known for his charged style of batting. He was also an economical and consistent bowler relying on changes of pace more than spin.
His career began with a bang, showing early signs of promise. He became the youngest batsman at 16 years and 217 days to score an international century. On his batting debut against Sri Lanka, he scored the fastest ever century at the time in just 37 balls hitting eleven sixes in the process, which is also a record.

Career Statistics

Full name: Sahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi

Born: 1 March 1975 (age 45)

Khyber, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Height: 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm leg spin

Playing Role: All-rounder

 

ODI Career (batting): Pakistan (1996–2018) 

Mat    Inns    NO  Runs     HS      Ave      BF        SR       100s   50s    4s       6s     

398     369     27    8064     124     23.57    6892    117.00     6      39      730     351 

 

ODI Career (bowling): Pakistan (1996–2018) 

Mat    Inns    Balls       Runs         Wkts     BBI     BBM       Ave    Econ   SR      4w      5w     10w

398     372      17670    13632         395       7/12    7/12       34.51  4.62    44.7     4          9       0

 

 

Career Highlights

  • Has produced three of the seven fastest ODI centuries of all time
  • Has an ODI strike rate of 117 runs per 100 balls, the third-highest in the game's history
  • Has second-best ODI bowling figures ever 7/12, taken against the West Indies.
  • 2nd player in ODI history with 6,000 runs and 300 wickets
  • Fastest ODI century (37 balls)
  • Most number of sixes in ODIs (351)
  • 2nd fastest half-century in ODI cricket (18 balls)
  • Leading wicket-taker in 2011 World Cup (21)

Legendary Pakistan all-rounder Shahid Afridi has admitted that bowling to West Indies legend Brian Lara was, for him, always a terrifying experience.

Despite managing to dismiss Lara on a few occasions, Afridi, a fearsome hitter of the ball himself, admits that he was never confident while running up to bowl to the often-brutal left-hander.

“That would have to be Brian Lara. I got him out a few times but whenever I was bowling to him, I always had the feeling in the back of my mind that he is going to hit me for four the next ball. He had an effect on me. I never bowled with any confidence to him,” Afridi said in a recent interview with Wisden.

Lara scored some 11,953 Test runs and 10405 ODI runs in a star-studded career, which included setting the highest individual score recorded in a Test match with 400.  Lara scored his highest total against Pakistan with a double century, at Multan, in 2006.

“He was a world-class batsman who dominated the best spinners he came up against, even the likes of Muttiah Muralitharan in Sri Lanka. His footwork against spinners was brilliant, and the way he batted against such bowlers was a wonderful sight. He was sheer class.”

 

There are so many things to love about cricket.  But most of us will freely admit that very few things are as satisfying as watching the ball scream well clear of the boundary ropes, perhaps to parts unknown. Unless, of course, you are watching your favourite bowler, or it was your team that desperately needed the ball to stay in the ground. 

Standing obdurately at the crease to deliver these telling blows are often some of cricket's Supermen, bulky, sinewy they come in all shapes and sizes, but one thing remains constant, once they get going, nothing gets in their way. 

Today we pay tribute to 10 of the game’s biggest hitters but with a twist. Our hitting greats have been put into two teams of five. Who could you count on to get the runs you need? Your guess is as good as ours.  Below are the picks for 10 of the heaviest hitters.