Milwaukee Bucks star Giannis Antetokounmpo wants to smoke a cigar like Michael Jordan and celebrate a potential NBA championship in Mykonos.

The Bucks were favourites to win the NBA title before the season was suspended indefinitely due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Milwaukee owned the best record in the league at 53-12, ahead of LeBron James' Los Angeles Lakers, in pursuit of their first title since 1971.

While COVID-19 has halted Milwaukee's quest, reigning MVP Antetokounmpo is hoping to take the NBA trophy to his native Greece and the party island of Mykonos – channelling Chicago Bulls great Jordan.

"Before all this happened with COVID-19, I was talking about taking the team on a trip to Greece in Mykonos," Antetokounmpo said via the Athletes Doing Good Radiothon on ESPN.

"Mykonos is one of the best islands in Greece, it's a party island. You cannot go there with your significant other, you got to be by yourself. It's got to be a boys' trip.

"Obviously, we have Santorini, Santorini's really romantic. It has the best sunset and sunrise in the world. You can take your significant other there.

"I had the opportunity to go last year – I went with [Eric] Bledsoe and Brook [Lopez] to Mykonos – and I was kind of sad I wasn't able to bring the whole team to experience what we went through.

"So definitely, I think, after we win the championship and we're holding the trophy and we're all smoking a cigar like M.J., we can all do that in Mykonos."

It remains to be seen when, and if, the 2019-20 season will resume following the coronavirus outbreak.

NBA practice facilities have started to re-open this month after the league had targeted no earlier than May 8 for teams to return to their complexes.

Commissioner Adam Silver is reportedly considering the league returning via two locations – Orlando and Las Vegas.

Michael Jordan has been branded a liar by ex-Chicago Bulls team-mate Horace Grant over claims made in 'The Last Dance' series.

In the 10-part docuseries, co-produced by ESPN and Netflix, Jordan accused Grant – who won three NBA championships with the Bulls – of being a source for Sam Smith's book 'The Jordan Rules', which paints the Hall of Famer in an unflattering light.

But Grant, whose relationship with Jordan soured and who later left for the Orlando Magic, denied the accusations and said Jordan merely holds a "grudge".

"Lie, lie, lie. If MJ had a grudge with me, let's settle this like men," Grant said on ESPN 1000 radio. 

"Let's talk about it. Or we can settle it another way. But yet and still, he goes out and puts this lie out that I was the source behind [The Jordan Rules]. 

"Sam Smith and I have always been great friends. We're still great friends. But the sanctity of that locker room, I would never put anything personal out there. 

"The mere fact that Sam Smith was an investigative reporter. That he had to have two sources, two, to write a book, I guess. Why would MJ just point me out?

"It's only a grudge, man. I'm telling you, it was only a grudge. And I think he proved that during this so-called documentary. When if you say something about him, he's going to cut you off, he's going to try to destroy your character."

The legendary Scottie Pippen, who was beside Jordan for each of the Bulls' six championships in an eight-year span, was another ex-player to appear in the documentary who was supposedly unhappy with his portrayal.

In one episode, Jordan said Pippen was "selfish" over his decision to delay foot surgery that saw him miss the start of the 1997-98 season.

"I have never seen a quote-unquote number two guy, as decorated as Scottie Pippen, portrayed so badly," added Grant, who suggested that the documentary was not a true reflection of events given the role Jordan's production company had in the making of the show.

"When that so-called documentary is about one person, basically, and he has the last word on what's going to be put out there…it's not a documentary.

"It's his narrative of what happens in the last, quote-unquote, dance. That's not a documentary because a whole bunch of things was cut out, edited out. So that's why I call it a so-called documentary."

Grant said that Jordan has a history of holding grudges, adding: "My point is, he said that I was the snitch, but yet and still after 35 years he brings up his rookie year going into one of his team-mates' rooms and seeing [drugs] and women.

"Why the hell did he want to bring that up? What's that got to do with anything? I mean, if you want to call somebody a snitch, that's a damn snitch right there."

Lionel Messi plays "different football to the others" and outranks Diego Maradona, Brazilian great Ronaldo and even US basketball superstar Michael Jordan in the sporting pantheon, according to Robert Prosinecki.

Barcelona and Argentina maestro Messi is "surely" the best footballer of all time, former Real Madrid and Barca playmaker Prosinecki claimed.

Prosinecki said in an interview with Stats Perform News that Messi, who has scored over 600 goals for Barcelona, still finishes top of the pile when the career of Chicago Bulls legend and six-time NBA champion Jordan is taken into account.

"It is different, basketball and football. But Messi is surely for me the best," said Prosinecki.

"He is a player who has made differences for many years in Barcelona. He has won everything he could win. He scored many goals and assisted many times too. He plays different football to the others."

Former Croatia midfield marauder Prosinecki knows some still look to Messi's fellow Argentinian Maradona when judging the greats, as well as two-time World Cup winner Ronaldo.

Prosinecki and Ronaldo were briefly team-mates at Camp Nou.

"Maybe some people will say Maradona, Ronaldo... I don't know," Prosinecki said. "There have been amazing players. They are from two different eras. For me he [Messi] is the best one."

According to Prosinecki's verdict, Messi and Brazilian Ronaldo are players that have shown themselves capable and willing to take on teams single-handedly.

"They are different to others. Ronaldo is surely one of the best," Prosinecki said.

"Some people would say Cristiano Ronaldo, but [Brazilian Ronaldo] didn't just play at Barcelona.

"He also had some amazing seasons at Inter. He used to beat rivals almost himself alone. Incredible. They are players who make differences. At Real Madrid too. Where didn't he perform?

"For sure he was a great player. However, if I have to say one, for me the best is Leo Messi."

LeBron James believes his "best assets work perfectly" with Michael Jordan as the Los Angeles Lakers superstar talked about playing alongside the Chicago Bulls great.

Debate in the NBA is often centred on who is the best player of all time – James or Jordan.

Jordan, 57, won six NBA championships, as many Finals MVP's and five Most Valuable Player awards during a remarkable career with the Bulls.

James has three titles to his name – two with the Miami Heat and one with the Cleveland Cavaliers – and three Finals MVP honours, while he is a four-time Most Valuable Player recipient.

Following the conclusion of ESPN's 10-part docuseries – 'The Last Dance' – focused on the Bulls team that won the 1997-98 NBA championship to complete a second three-peat in eight years, James fantasized about being Jordan's team-mate.

"Me personally the way I play the game -- team first -- I feel like my best assets work perfectly with Mike," the 35-year-old said in a video via Uninterrupted's YouTube Channel on Monday.

"Mike is an assassin. When it comes to playing the game of basketball, scoring the way he scored the ball [then] my ability to pass, my ability to read the game plays and plays and plays in advance."

James added: "I saw the things [Scottie Pippen] was able to do with Mike, I just think it would've been a whole 'nother level.

"Pip was one of my favourite players...it would've been a whole 'nother level with me being a point forward with me being that point forward alongside of him during those Chicago runs."

James also remembered taking part in Jordan's annual summer camp at UC-Santa Barbara after being drafted as the number one pick in 2003.

"We used to play around 9 p.m. The camp would end…and we would stay along with the college kids that he would invite," James said. "We would get a good-ass run in for about an hour, an hour-15. I was on the same team with MJ and we didn't lose a game."

Chicago Bulls legend Michael Jordan says food poisoning and not the flu was responsible for him being sick for Game 5 of the 1997 NBA Finals against the Utah Jazz.

Episode nine of 'The Last Dance' - ESPN's 10-part docuseries on the Bulls team that won the 1997-98 NBA championship to complete a second three-peat in eight years - featured a section on what came to be known as the 'flu game'.

It has been widely believed Jordan had been suffering from flu-like symptoms ahead of the clash in Salt Lake City, but the five-time MVP has provided a different version of events.

"The day before Game 5 in Utah, I'm at the Marriott. It was George [Kohler, personal assistant], myself, Tim [Grover, personal trainer], and I think a couple of security guards. But it's like 10, 10:30 at night, I'm hungry," Jordan explained.

Grover and Koehler managed to find a pizza place that was open and placed an order but were surprised to see five people deliver it.

Jordan continued: "I eat the pizza all by myself, nobody else eats it. I wake up about 2:30, throwing up left and right.

"So really it wasn't the flu game, it was food poisoning."

He added: "I stayed in bed all day, couldn't eat anything, couldn't hold nothing down.

"Phil [Jackson, Bulls coach] comes in and says, 'What do you think?' And I say, 'Look, I'm gonna try, it's Game 5, if anything I can be a decoy.' So I'm going out and I'm gonna play."

Despite suffering from sickness, news of which emerged in the media before tip-off, Jordan scored 38 points to lead the Bulls to a 90-88 victory and a 3-2 series lead.

Jordan also had seven rebounds, five assists, three steals and one block in a display that remains one of the most iconic in the history of the league.

The 1997-98 Chicago Bulls could win championships "in any era" and would stack up well against today's Los Angeles Lakers or Milwaukee Bucks, Rusty LaRue has said.

ESPN's 'The Last Dance' - a 10-part docuseries on the Bulls team that won a sixth championship in eight years in 1998 – has now concluded after reporting huge ratings across the past five weeks.

Throughout most of the 1990s, no team could stop Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen and Dennis Rodman as the Bulls became one of the most dominant outfits in sport.

The NBA has changed significantly, though, with three-point specialist Stephen Curry spearheading the Golden State Warriors' run to the previous five NBA Finals.

However, LaRue, a rookie point guard with the 1997-98 Bulls, is adamant the Chicago team he was on would be able to mix it up with Curry, LeBron James and Giannis Antetokounmpo.

"I certainly think that team is going to be competing for the championship, probably win it," LaRue told Stats Perform.

"The one thing that you can't forget is the Bulls were a little ahead of their time.

"While they weren't necessarily the three-point barrage teams of today, the multi-position guys were basically big guards who could play all over the court - that was their roster.

"You had Steve Kerr who was a normal-sized guard but Jordan's 6ft 6ins, Pippen's 6ft 8ins, [Toni] Kukoc's 6ft 10ins, Ron Harper was 6ft 6ins.

"Those guys could guard multiple positions, play multiple positions. I think that lends itself well to today's game where you go out and you have multi-faceted people.

"Pippen could guard about any position on the court, so could Dennis Rodman, Jordan pretty much could, so I certainly think that team would be at the top of the echelon and probably be winning consistent championships in any era."

The Lakers are the only team to have three-peated since the Bulls, with former Chicago coach Phil Jackson leading them to a trio of championships between 2000 and 2002.

Golden State's bid for three Larry O'Brien Trophies in a row was dashed by the Toronto Raptors last year.

However, the 2015-16 Warriors team broke the 1995-96 Bulls' record for most regular-season victories when they went 73-9.

A pair of signed sneakers worn by the legendary Michael Jordan during his stellar career were sold for a record $560,000 at auction on Sunday.

Jordan's Nike footwear were estimated to fetch a quarter of what they went for, Sotheby's revealed.

The Air Jordan 1s were designed for the Chicago Bulls great in 1985 before he went on to be named NBA MVP five times.

A pair of 1972 Nike running shoes known as the 'Moon Shoe' previously held the record for sneakers sold by Sotheby's last year, with $437,500 forked out on that occasion.

Jordan has been in the headlines recently with the huge success of documentary 'The Last Dance.'

Sotheby's director of eCommerce development Brahm Wachter said: "We saw tremendous bidding up until the moment the sale closed, with the value more than doubling in the final hour alone.

"That coupled with strong international bidding from six countries on four continents shows not only the incredible appeal of Michael Jordan... but also that sneaker collecting is truly a global and growing market."

It is 35 years since Michael Jordan was named NBA Rookie of the Year and England claimed an elusive first major one-day trophy on this day a decade ago.

Jordan has been in the headlines with "The Last Dance" documentary going down a storm 35 years after he was named best rookie in the league.

May 16 was also a day England cricket lovers can reflect on with great memories, having beaten fierce rivals Australia to win the 2010 ICC World Twenty20 final in Bridgetown, Barbados.

It has also been a day of great significance for former Italy striker Roberto Baggio.

 

1985 - A sign of things to come from magnificent Jordan 

Making the step up to the NBA was no problem for Jordan, who lit the league up in his rookie season.

He finished third in the scoring charts and fourth with his tally of steals, steering the Chicago Bulls into the playoffs for the first time in four years.

In the first 35 games of his NBA career Jordan scored a total of 918 points; Elvin Hayes is the only rookie since 1963-64 with more (1,052).

Jordan averaged 28.2 points, 6.5 rebounds, 5.9 assists and 2.39 steals in his debut season, so there was really only going to be one man landing the gong. 

 

2004 - Please don't go, Baggio 

It was on this day 16 years ago that the classy Baggio played the last match of his magnificent career.

The majestic playmaker was unable to celebrate a fitting winning finale, his Brescia side losing 4-2 at Milan.

A packed San Siro gave the ex-Italy maestro an emotional send-off, though, rising to give Baggio a standing ovation when he was substituted late on.

Both sets of players also stopped to applaud the 37-year-old, who had been among the best players in the world when in his prime.

 

2010 - England conquer in the Caribbean

It was England's day at the Kensington Oval, where they won the third edition of the men's T20 World Cup by seven wickets.

Australia posted 147-6 after Paul Collingwood put them in, Ryan Sidebottom taking 2-26 and David Hussey top scoring with 59.

England cruised to victory following a blistering second-wicket stand of 111 between Craig Kieswetter and Kevin Pietersen. 

Kieswetter was named man of the match after smashing 63 from 49 balls, with Pietersen's swashbuckling 47 coming off just 31 deliveries before Collingwood and Eoin Morgan put Australia out of their misery.

Count Zlatan Ibrahimovic among those who approve of Chicago Bulls great Michael Jordan's confrontational leadership style.

ESPN's docuseries 'The Last Dance', which looks at the 1997-98 Bulls team that three-peated, shone a spotlight on Jordan's treatment of team-mates in one of the recent episodes.

He revealed how he came to blows with current Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr during practice and used tough love to try and coax the best out of Scott Burrell.

"Winning has a price and leadership has a price," a choked-up Jordan said at the end of episode seven.

"I pulled people along when they didn't want to be pulled. I challenged people when they didn't want to be challenged.

"I earned that right because my team-mates came after me. They didn't endure all the things that I endured.

"Once you join the team you live at a certain standard that I play the game, and I wasn't going to take anything less."

That struck a chord with brash striker Ibrahimovic.

"Nice to see The Last Dance," he wrote on Twitter.

"Now you see how it is to play with a winner. Either you like it or not. If not then don't play the game."

Ibrahimovic is currently at Milan and has received praise from head coach Stefano Pioli, who likened his work ethic to that of 20-time grand slam winner Roger Federer.

However, the Swede has also been known to clash with former coaches and team-mates.

During his time in MLS with LA Galaxy, Joao Pedro said Ibrahimovic threatened to "kill" players following a loss to Houston Dynamo.

Sebastian Lletget also said it was "super frustrating" playing with Ibrahimovic at the Galaxy.

Michael Jordan only tolerated competitive players and his team-mates needed "thick skin" to survive in Chicago, according to former Bulls guard Rusty LaRue.

The seventh episode of ESPN's docuseries 'The Last Dance' – a look at the 1997-98 Bulls team that three-peated – detailed Jordan's attitude towards other players and the notion he could not be a nice guy in practice because he was demanding.

"Winning has a price and leadership has a price," a choked-up Jordan said.

"I pulled people along when they didn't want to be pulled. I challenged people when they didn't want to be challenged.

"I earned that right because my team-mates came after me. They didn't endure all the things that I endured.

"Once you join the team you live at a certain standard that I play the game, and I wasn't going to take anything less."

LaRue was an NBA rookie that season with the Bulls, joining a Chicago team where the status quo had already been established with five championships in the previous seven seasons.

The former point guard revealed it was Jordan, arguably the greatest player of all time, who set the tone and he had no issues with his leadership style.

"By the time I had gotten with the team it was 'The Last Dance'," LaRue told Stats Perform.

"Everyone there had kind of been through the trials and understood the deal and knew what to expect.

"Obviously Mike's a competitive guy. I think everyone knew where they stood with him.

"You didn't make it with the Bulls organisation or that team with him if you weren't a competitive guy.

"All the guys that were there had kind of passed the test – for lack of a better term – and were in it for the right reasons and a piece of that team for different reasons.

"Michael, if he didn't think you were on board or weren't competitive, he certainly would ride you and you had to have thick skin.

"It didn't really bother me, I had high expectations for myself and I think any time you play with a competitor, they want you to compete.

"You're competing against them every day and you compete on a daily basis and you won't have any problems."

LaRue, who played college basketball alongside Tim Duncan at Wake Forest, was a role player with Phil Jackson's team that season and believes not being overawed by Jordan helped him make the Bulls roster.

"You know he's one of the greatest players – if not the greatest player – to ever play," LaRue added of Jordan.

"I think for me that was part of what helped me make the team, that I wasn't intimidated. I'm pretty confident in my abilities and I just kind of come and be who I am.

"I've always been a believer in you go in and compete to the best of your ability and let the chips fall where they may, that's what I did in that situation."

When he was a child, Russell Westbrook passed up the chance to meet Michael Jordan because he was too busy playing basketball.

Jordan and the 1990s Chicago Bulls, with whom he won six NBA championships, are back in public focus due to the new 10-part documentary 'The Last Dance'.

Houston Rockets guard Westbrook attended one of Jordan's basketball camps in his formative years and detailed how he snubbed the five-time NBA MVP.

"The first time I had an opportunity to meet Michael Jordan… I probably was about 10 or 11. I went to a Michael Jordan camp. My parents sent me to his camp in Santa Barbara," Westbrook told NBC's The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.

"At the end of the camp, usually every kid on every team brings something for Michael Jordan to sign. You need to stand in line and be ready to go.

"When my team was up to get a basketball signed — my parents gave me a basketball to get signed — I don't know why, I don't know what I was thinking, but when it was my team and my time to go, I was in the middle of a game. I was playing pickup with other kids.

"My coach was like, 'Come on, come on, come on. You're going to miss the opportunity to get a picture with Michael Jordan and an autograph with him.' Myself, I said, 'Don't worry, I'm okay, I don't need it right now.'

"So I didn't get a picture with Michael Jordan, didn't get an autograph. I literally didn't get in line. I just kept playing basketball, kept hooping.

"When camp was over and I got home, my mum and dad were like, 'Did you get the ball signed?' I literally was like, 'No, I was playing a pickup game.' At the time, it didn't click to me."

Westbrook's decision seemingly did not have any impact on their relationship as the Rockets star signed with the Jordan brand in 2013.

Arsene Wenger began his long goodbye at Arsenal on this day in 2018, while April 20 is a day fondly remembered by Chicago Bulls icon Michael Jordan and racing driver Danica Patrick.

The end of a near 22-year love affair, which admittedly soured a little by the end, was announced by Wenger who revealed the 2017-18 season would be his last with the Gunners.

NBA great Jordan posted an astounding new playoff benchmark, while Patrick earned her own place in history.

Here's a reflective look at April 20 of yesteryears.

 

2018 – This is Gunner be tough. Wenger prepares for Arsenal goodbye

The news that Wenger was to leave Arsenal after almost 22 years had a certain inevitability about it.

'Le Professeur' oversaw one of the most successful periods in the club's history, winning three Premier League titles and seven FA Cups – including the double in 1998 and 2002, while he was the man in charge of Arsenal's 'Invincibles', who produced an unbeaten top-flight campaign in 2003-04.

But there was an increasingly growing "Wenger Out" brigade and, with Arsenal set to miss out on Champions League football, there was little surprise when he announced 2017-18 would be his last in charge.

"I am grateful for having had the privilege to serve the club for so many memorable years. I managed the club with full commitment and integrity. To all the Arsenal lovers, take care of the values of the club," Wenger said.

2008 – Patrick makes history in Japan

Three years previously, Patrick had made history by becoming the first female to ever lead the historic Indy500 race.

And on April 20, 2008, she etched her name further into the record books by winning the Indy Japan 300 in Montegi, Japan.

It was the first time a female driver had won a race in the IndyCar series.

Patrick was 5.8 seconds clear of pole-sitter Helio Castroneves, with leader Scott Dixon having pitted with five laps to go and Dan Wheldon and Tony Kanaan doing likewise a lap later.

"It's a long time coming. Finally. It was a fuel-strategy race, but my team called it perfectly for me. I knew I was on the same strategy as Helio and when I passed him for the lead, I couldn't believe it. This is fabulous," said Patrick.

1986 – Jordan's playoff heroics the best ever game?

The history books show a double-overtime 135-131 defeat for the Chicago Bulls and a 3-0 first-round defeat to the Boston Celtics.

But in one of the NBA's greatest arenas – the Boston Garden – Jordan, regarded by many as the greatest of all time, put on the performance of a lifetime.

Jordan scored 63 points – a record in a playoff game – to take it to the champions, and saw Larry Bird utter the famous "God disguised as Michael Jordan" assessment.

The Celtics went on to win the Championship that year, but Jordan would become a six-time NBA champion, winning the Finals MVP in each of those successful series with the Bulls.

Scotland rugby union fans have been starved of success in recent times but March 27 is a date when they can always raise a glass to a moment of history.

Way back in 1871, Scotland beat neighbours England in the first ever international in Edinburgh.

It was also a memorable day in the NBA, with a record crowd in attendance as Michael Jordan starred at Georgia Dome in 1998.

Here, we take a look back at the some of the most notable sporting moments that occurred on this date down the years.

1871 - Buchanan and Scotland make history

A crowd of 4,000 flocked to Raeburn Place in Edinburgh to watch history be made.

It was the hosts who came out on top, scoring two tries and a goal to England's solitary try – with Scotland's Angus Buchanan the first man to touch down over the whitewash at international level.

There were two halves of 50 minutes apiece, with 20 players on each side and the contest decided by goals scored.

1998 – Bulls clip the Hawks' wings in front of record crowd 

Twenty-two years ago, 62,046 spectators watched on at the Georgia Dome as the Atlanta Hawks took on the Chicago Bulls.

It remains the largest crowd at any game in NBA history, having surpassed the record of 61,983 set at Detroit Pistons v Boston Celtics in 1988.

Inspired by NBA icon Jordan, the Bulls downed their hosts 89-74.

2007 – Video replays introduced to help NFL officials

On March 27, 2007, NFL owners voted to utilise video replays as a tool to assist officials – the vote passed with 30 owners in favour of the move.

Cincinnati Bengals and the Arizona Cardinals did not agree to the use of replays, with each team paying up to $300,000 to have the necessary equipment fitted at their stadiums.

"It's a long time coming," said then-Atlanta Falcons general manager Rich McKay. "It made sense to us this year to do it. Instant replay is an accepted part of the game. It's what we are. There was not really much discussion about it."

In the same meeting, a proposal to allow a second interviewing window for assistant coaches on Super Bowl teams was approved, though it was decided defenses would not be allowed to use a coach-to-player communication device.

It is 48 years to the day since the Los Angeles Lakers set a new NBA benchmark with 69 regular-season wins.

Bill Sharman's Lakers routed the Seattle Supersonics to end the year with a 69-13 record and the best win percentage (.841) posted by a team.

The stunning Los Angeles season bettered the Philadelphia 76ers' mark from five years earlier, although the Chicago Bulls and then the Golden State Warriors have since set the standard.

The Warriors' record will stand for at least another year, too, with the 53-12 Milwaukee Bucks faltering following Giannis Antetokounmpo's injury.

With the campaign now paused amid the coronavirus pandemic, we take a look at the teams and seasons that led the way.
 

PHILADELPHIA 76ERS: 1966-67 - 68-13 (.840)

Since the Washington Capitols ended the first 60-game NBA season with a 49-11 record in 1946-47, no team had been able to post a regular-season win percentage of .800 or above - until the Sixers.

Philadelphia dominated from start to finish in 1966-67, led by MVP Wilt Chamberlain. The campaign was the first and only to include 81 games, adding another to make the existing 82-game schedule the following year, and the Sixers finished eight games clear of a strong Boston Celtics outfit in the East.

Chamberlain was the only Philly player to make the All-NBA First Team, but the Sixers' depth made them one of the greats, and they ended the year as champions with an NBA Finals success against the San Francisco Warriors.

LOS ANGELES LAKERS: 1971-72 - 69-13 (.841)

With an extra game to play with, it did not take the Lakers too long to edge past the Sixers. And Chamberlain was again the star.

After leaving the Sixers in 1968, Chamberlain was outstanding once again in his penultimate season in the league, while Jerry West - whose silhouette graced a new NBA logo that remains to this day - also impressed.

Chamberlain refused to compare LA to his Philadelphia team after breaking the record, but they ultimately matched the Sixers by claiming the championship, with the veteran the Finals MVP against the New York Knicks.

CHICAGO BULLS: 1995-96 - 72-10 (.878)

It took 24 years and arguably the greatest player in the history of the sport to break the Lakers' record. Michael Jordan lifted the Bulls to the first ever 70-win season in 1995-96.

Playing his first full season back following his initial retirement, there was still no stopping Jordan as he kickstarted the Bulls' second run of three straight championships.

The guard was the MVP, the league's leading scorer and then the Finals MVP, while Chicago finished 12 games clear of the Orlando Magic.

They only lost three more games in the playoffs, too, sweeping the Magic in the Eastern Conference Finals before beating the Seattle Supersonics to take the title.

GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS: 2015-16 - 73-9 (.890)

Only two teams have ever broken the 70-win barrier, but the second, the Warriors, remarkably could not follow up their regular-season success with the title.

Golden State won three championships over a four-year stretch but could not get the job done against LeBron James' Cleveland Cavaliers in the Finals in 2016.

The Warriors' stunning regular-season efforts overshadowed an impressive 67-win San Antonio Spurs campaign, with Stephen Curry the MVP and top scorer, but the NBA's outstanding team went down to the Cavs in Game Seven.

Live sport is proving difficult to come by amid the coronavirus pandemic, so we looked back through sporting history to identify major events or news to occur on this day.

March 19 certainly wasn't short of options, though we managed to nail it down to five occasions that were particularly notable.

They include the indictment of one former baseball player and another returning to the basketball court where he made his name.

Below, take yourself on a trip down memory lane… Or just get a little sporting education.

 

1978 – Nicklaus wins his third Players Championship

Jack Nicklaus enjoyed many a famous victory during his sparkling golfing career, but his win at the 1978 Players Championship was a peculiar one. In demanding weather conditions, with wind wreaking havoc, Nicklaus won his third Players title, beating Lou Graham by a single shot. No one finished the tournament below par, with Nicklaus' one-over 289 incredibly enough to secure him the title.

1984 – Former MLB pitcher McLain indicted

Regarded as a great during his time as a professional pitcher in baseball, Denny McLain's life away from the sport was rather more chaotic. Having gone off the rails after his career ran its course, McLain was charged with racketeering and narcotics violations on March 19, 1984, before being sentenced to 23 years in prison. He served two-and-a-half years, before an appeals court threw out the verdict and set McLain free. He went back to prison in 1996 on charges of embezzlement, money laundering, mail fraud and conspiracy.

1991 – Phoenix stripped of 1993 Super Bowl

The 1993 Super Bowl was due to be held in Phoenix, Arizona. However, the state's lack of recognition for Martin Luther King Jr. Day saw them stripped of the event. President Ronald Reagan had declared Martin Luther King Jr. Day a national holiday eight years earlier and, at the time, Arizona adhered to the legislature. It wasn't until 1987 when Republican governor Evan Mecham took office that the MLK celebration was cancelled. The holiday returned to Arizona in 1993 following a vote the year before.

1995 – Michael Jordan returns

After 17 months away from basketball, during which time he had a spell in baseball, Michael Jordan was back on this day in 1995. Twenty-four hours after Jordan had announced "I'm back", he was playing once again for his beloved Chicago Bulls, scoring 19 points in an overtime 103-96 defeat to the Indiana Pacers.

2019 – Harden makes NBA history

Just last year, Houston Rockets guard James Harden made history when he became the first NBA player to score at least 30 points against every opponent in the league. He accomplished the feat with a haul of 31 in a win over the Atlanta Hawks. Just the game before, Harden had seen his 32-game streak of scoring 30 points or more end – that remains the second-longest such run in NBA history.

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