Jamaica’s men’s and women’s 4x400m relay teams refused to come away from the Doha World Championships empty-handed after battling to win silver and bronze medals, respectively, as the event ended on Sunday.

Anderson Peters became only the second athlete in history to claim a gold medal for Grenada at the IAAF World Championships after claiming gold in the men’s Javelin on Sunday.

Jamaica Diamond League champion Danielle Williams held on for bronze behind the United States duo of Kendra Harrison and Nia Ali in the women’s 100m hurdles final on Sunday.

Williams, who had one of the best seasons of her career, entered the final as the favourite but finished third in 12.47.  Ali, who finished behind Williams with a personal best of 12.44 in the first semifinal, went on to smash that mark after claiming the gold medal in 12.34.

Kendra Harrison, the world record holder, was third after finishing behind Ali in 12.46.  Williams got away from the blocks well but never managed to pull away from a fast field and seemed to really feel the pressure with a slight wobble at the 6th hurdle.  Ali in the meantime put on a superb display of speed and near flawless hurdling.

The other Jamaicans in the race Janeek Brown and Megan Tapper ended at the back of the field.  Brown finished seventh in a time of 12.88 while Tapper did not finish, having failed to recover after crashing into the third hurdle.

Bahamian national record holder Shaunae Miller-Uibo insists she had very little reason to feel disappointed despite finishing second to Bahrain’s Salwa Eid Naser in the women’s 400m on Thursday.

Miller-Uibo entered the event as the prohibitive favourite, having not lost in the event for close to two years.  Eid Naser, who had shown impressive form as she trotted to the line in the semi-finals, was in a different class in the final, however, and put away the field with an impressive 48.14.  The Bahamian also clocked a personal best with an area record 48.37 an astounding 0.6 seconds off her previous personal best.

The time recorded by Eid Naser was, however, the third-fastest in history and the fastest run over the distance in 36 years.  On the face of such a stunning performance, Miller-Uibo has chosen to focus on the positive of a smashing new personal best and maximum effort on the track.

"I just wanted to go out there and give it my all and I did just that.  I just give God all the thanks and praise for allowing me to finish healthy.  To finish with a PR like that, .6 of a PR is huge," Miller-Uibo said.

“We came into the season knowing that we could drop 48 low and we did just that so I can’t be disappointed with the race.  We gave it our all and to come out with a silver medal with that time is impressive.”

“Coming off the curve I saw the distance between us and I already knew in my head that she was too far away.  I also knew I had a whole of strength left and I used it but it just wasn’t good enough I guess, but I know we gave it our all and to PR with .6 is impressive so I’m really happy.”

Bahamian quarter-mile star Shaunae Miller-Uibo clocked a massive personal best and new national record but had to settle for silver behind Bahrain’s Salwa Eid Naser in the women’s 400m on Thursday.

Miller-Uibo, who had not lost over the event in almost two years, had looked impervious heading into the event but even she was no match for Eid Naser’s blistering run.  The Bahrainian, who ran out of lane four, had the field covered by the first bend before easily fending off a fast closing Miller-Uibo down the stretch.

Eid Naser’s winning time of 48.14 was the fastest time recorded over the event in 36 years and third fastest of all time behind Czechoslovakia’s Jamila Kratochvilova (47.99) and East Germany’s Marita Koch (47.60).

Miller-Uibo who came into the competition with a long unbeaten streak over both the 400 and 200m, uncharacteristically found herself trailing off the corner and gamely chased Eid Naser to the line but could not get close enough to the runaway sprinter.  The athlete’s time of 48.37 was a new national and area record and shaved 0.6th of a second off her previous personal best.  Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson finished in third place, also recording a personal best of 49.47, after fending off a challenge from the American duo of Wadeline Jonathas (49.60) and Phyllis Francis (49.61).  Stephenie-Ann McPherson, the other Jamaican in the race, finished 6th in 50.89.

  

Danniel Thomas-Dodd put on a show and took the silver medal in the Women’s Shot Put on Thursday at the IAAF World Championships of Athletics in Doha, Qatar on Thursday.

Dethroned 110 metres hurdles World Champion Omar McLeod has revealed that he suffered from a hamstring issue during a calamitous end to his title defense at the Doha World Championships on Wednesday.

In a close race, McLeod trailed eventual winner Grant Holloway of the United States but crashed into the penultimate hurdle before sprawling to the floor.  In the process, the Jamaican also briefly blocked the path of Spain’s Orlando Ortega who looked to also be in medal contention.  The athlete, who had a wobbly year in terms of his preparation for the World Championships, explained that a hamstring issue had impacted his performance.

“I got out hard and came off the first hurdle and my hamstring grabbed, so I didn’t get to be as snappy as I wanted,” McLeod explained.

“It got to a level of comfort where I thought I could pull through and at least get a medal or just still battle, still go to the line but then it grabbed again at the 6th hurdle and that’s when I lost my balance,” he added.

Heading into the championships, McLeod had suffered a tumultuous period where he changed four coaches in the last three years.  The athlete only joined his current coaching team, led by Rayna Reider, 10 weeks ahead of the Championships.  He insisted he was proud of his effort.

“I’m very proud of myself.  I showed up.  I’ve been through a lot this year and made sure I put myself to at least come prepared to defend my title.

“I’m very disheartened for Ortega for what had happened to him.  If I could take that bad I would.”

    

Jamaican sprinter Elaine Thompson has withdrawn from the ongoing IAAF World Championships after suffering a flare-up of a longstanding Achilles tendon issue.

The 27-year-old sprinter looked well short of her best after finishing fourth in the 100m with a time of 10.93.  The event was won by compatriot Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce with a time of 10.71.

 Thompson went on to qualify for the 200m semi-finals but mentioned that a flare-up of the Achilles issue had made life uncomfortable over the shorter distance.

The athlete had been drawn to run in Heat 2 of Tuesday’s semi-finals but did not face the starter.  Sashalee Forbes will be the country’s lone representative in the event.  Thompson’s withdrawal from the meet will also impact the Jamaica team for the 4x100m relays.

Heading into the Doha Championships Thompson’s time of 10.73 was the fastest in the world and her time of 22.00 in the 200m was second in the world behind Shaunae Miller-Uibo’s 21.74.

Newly-crowned 100m World Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has offered kind words of encouragement to young compatriot Briana Williams who missed out on an appearance at the Doha Championships after being embroiled in a doping controversy.

The 17-year-old Williams was hit with a reprimand after returning an adverse analytical finding, following the Jamaica National Championships.  The athlete, who returned a test for the banned diuretic Hydrochlorothiazide, provided the explanation that the substance was part of a contaminated batch of flu medication she had ingested on the morning of the championships. 

An Independent Anti-Doping Disciplinary Panel ruling on the matter issued Williams with a reprimand and did not prescribe any period of ineligibility for the athlete but based on the IAAF’s rules the results earned at Jamaica’s National Trials were scrubbed from the record. Williams had secured her spot on the World Championship team after finishing third behind Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson in the 100m.  Though selected to the team the athlete later withdrew after being replaced by Jonielle Smith for the 100m and facing time considerations for the relay squad.

“I’ve been in that situation before when I took a painkiller and it was very hard for me to come back and not focus on that incident,” Fraser-Pryce said.

In 2010, Fraser-Pryce served a six-month ban after testing positive for Oxycodone at the Shanghai Diamond League meeting.  The athlete had taken the substance to provide relief for a severe toothache.

“It happens, unfortunately.  I would not have wished that on anyone, and I hope that she can stay strong and stay motivated and forget about what anyone else has to say.  It’s about what you know and what you believe, and you can come back from anything.”

Four-time world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has targeted becoming a member of the exclusive 10.6s club by next year’s Tokyo Olympic Games.


The 32-year-old once again proved to be the woman to beat after obliterating the field to claim the women’s 100m title at the Doha World Championships on Sunday. The medal was Fraser-Pryce’s 8th World Championships gold overall, adding to two Olympic medals to make for one of the most impressive tallies of all-time.


Fraser-Pryce’s blistering burst of 10.71, was remarkably the sixth time the athlete has recorded a time in that range at a major championship. The exception came in 2016 when she lost to compatriot Elaine Thompson at the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. For the athlete, who seems to have made the art of peaking at the right time an exact science, the achievement was even more special this time around, having come back to the sport after having her first child. It’s hard to imagine that just two years ago she watched the London World Championships from her living room couch.


With a combined 16 medals at the Olympic and World Championship level it hard to imagine something missing from such a stellar CV but there remains an achievement that continues to elude the diminutive Jamaican champion.

Despite her personal best of 10.70 being just on the cusp of cracking the 10.6 barrier it remains a bridge the athlete is yet to cross. So far, it is a feat that has been achieved by three women in history, Florence Griffith-Joyner (10.49), Carmelita Jeter (10.64) and Marion Jones (10.65), all Americans.


“I definitely think I have a 10.6 within me. I don’t know why it’s still within me but we are working on it and we have 10 months to go until Tokyo so hopefully, we can get it together,” Fraser-Pryce said.

“My coach did say earlier that he believes I’m not fully back. So, we are working on it,” she added.


Despite not yet managing to achieve the mark, the athlete insisted that she took comfort in maintaining such a high level for such a long period and hoped to continue inspiring future generations.


“The only Championship that I’ve not managed to run a 10.7 is the Rio Olympics and for me this longevity is a major plus. It’s just my hope that young athletes that are coming up can understand that you have time and it can happen. You can do well even after a number of years."