Former West Indies pace bowler Franklyn Rose believes the development of the regional team has been hampered by a ‘chop and change’ mentality with batsman Shai Hope being just the most recent victim.

The decision to drop the 27-year-old Hope, after his recent monumental struggles, has divided public opinion.  While some believe the player could benefit from time away from the team to address potential confidence and technical issues, others believe the batsman would best be served staying within the system, even if he remains outside of the first team.

Rose, for his part, believes with the team currently in rebuilding mode, nothing will be gained from the talented player being pushed out of the squad at this point.

“They’re rebuilding, how are you going to get rid of the guy (Hope) when you are rebuilding.  He’s one of the brightest talents,” Rose told the Mason and Guest radio program.

 “West Indies cricket is rebuilding.  You cannot chop and change while rebuilding.  Shai Hope, one of the best talents in the Caribbean, you just drop him like that.  I would have brought him on tour, got him to play a few of the practice games.  Even if he doesn’t get to play Test matches.  What cricket is he going to play now to get back his confidence?”

Former West Indies fast bowler Franklyn Rose has expressed serious concerns regarding the fitness of spinner Rahkeem Cornwall, despite admitting that the bowler has incredible talent.

The 27-year-old off-spinner was recently selected as part of a 15-man Test squad that will face New Zealand in a two-match series later this month.  

After putting in several strong performances at the regional and A-Team level, the player made his debut for the West Indies senior team against India last year.

Cornwall has since gone on to appear in three matches, where he has claimed 13 wickets with a best innings of 7 for 75 against Afghanistan.  Discussions surrounding the player have, however, inexorably centred around his weight.  At an estimated 1.96 m and 308 lbs, he is believed to be the heaviest man to ever play Test cricket.  The debate surrounding the issue has settled mainly into two camps, with some believing the player should continue to be given a chance because of his achievements to date and others believing he should be judged on the same fitness merit as other players selected for the squad.  Rose has trended toward the latter.

“He has a lot of talent, but no disrespect, I have a problem with his fitness,” Rose told the Mason and Guest radio program.

“Say for example they play him in the first Test and he makes 100 runs. ‘Very well done, congratulations’ but when he goes out into the field to field, how many runs is he going to give away?” he added.

“No disrespect, it doesn’t fit the profile of a Test cricketer.  Maybe try him with the T20.  Can he bat for three days? Do you think he can bat for three days in a Test match? Can he chase the ball to the boundary, pick it up and throw it back in?”

Cornwall is often deployed in the slip positions when the team is on fielding duty.

West Indies legend Curtly Ambrose has revealed that he expected the pace bowling tandem of Franklyn Rose and Corey Collymore to pick up where he and strike partner Courtney Walsh left off.

Walsh and Ambrose are widely considered the last in a long line of dominant and fearsome West Indies bowlers that had stretched on for several generations.

Before the heyday of Walsh and Ambrose, West Indies quicks like Wes Hall, Charlie Griffith, Andy Roberts, Colin Croft, Joel Garner, Michael Holding, and Malcolm Marshall hunted in packs as they menacingly stalked the crease of fearful opposition batsmen.

It came to an end with Walsh and Ambrose, however, and so it seems did the West Indies fortunes as a winning team.

“Before Courtney and I left the team, we had around six fast bowlers around us.  We thought maybe three or four of them could become great,” Ambrose told the Mason and Guest radio program.

“We had Franklin Rose, Rayon King, Dillon, Nixon McClean, Pedro Collins, and Corey Collymore.  Six who I thought would have carried on the tradition of fast bowlers,” he added.

“Courtney and I talked about it and we always felt that Franklin Rose and Corey Collymore would be the two guys to lead the rest of the attack.  These were two guys who had tremendous potential to lead the rest of the attack," Ambrose said.

“Franklin Rose turned out to be a bit of an enigma, you never know which side of the bed he’ll wake up on up.  So, you can never be too sure with him.  Collymore, when he first played against Australia in 1999, I said to Courtney ‘hey we have a young man here who looks the part’ and then, unfortunately, his back went out soon after that and he has never been the same.”

In recent times, Kemar Roach, who recently claimed his 200th Test wicket, has come to the fore along with Shannon Gabriel, Jason Holder, and Alzarri Joseph to give the bowling line-up more credibility.

 

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