One of the most explosive all-rounders of the modern era, Ben Stokes's energy is infectious on the cricket field. He is extremely passionate about everything that he does.

In the World T20 held in India, he was at the receiving end of Carlos Brathwaite's broad willow as he was smacked for four sixes in the last over of the final at Eden Gardens. Stokes was shattered as West Indies clinched the title.

Despite the World T20 setback, Stokes' career has progressed in remarkable fashion.  A genuine seam-bowling all-rounder who has the ability to hit big shots is a priceless commodity in the T20 format. Therefore, it wasn’t a surprise when Ben Stokes fetched earth-shattering numbers at the 2017 Indian Premier League (IPL) auction. He was picked up by the Rising Pune Supergiants and in his maiden IPL season, the charismatic Englishman showed he was worth all the money.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Benjamin Andrew Stokes

Born: June 4, 1991 (29), Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Major teams: England, Canterbury, Durham, Durham 2nd XI, England Development Programme Under-19s, England Lions, England Performance Programme, England Performance Programme XI, England Under-19s, Melbourne Renegades, Rajasthan Royals, Rising Pune Supergiant

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

T20I Career - England (Batting)

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs    HS    Ave     BF     SR        100   50    4s     6s   

26        23     6      305      47*   17.94  227    134.36     0      0     25     13   

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs    HS      Ave      BF       SR       100    50    4s     6s    

123    113    19     2330     103*   24.78    1720   135.46     1      8     180   102    

 

T20I Career – England (Bowling)

Mat   Inns   Balls    Runs   Wkts    BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ   SR       4w    5w    10w

26       21     388      571       14     3/26     3/26     40.78   8.82    27.7      0         0      0

T20 Career (Bowling)

Mat   Inns   Balls    Runs    Wkts    BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ   SR     4w    5w    10w

123     87     1537    2156      68      4/16     4/16     31.70    8.41   22.6    1       0         0

 

Career Highlights

  • Has scored 305 T20I runs at an average of 17.94
  • Has taken 14 T20I wickets at 40.78
  • 2017 IPL Player of the tournament (316r & 12 wkts)
  • 68 T20 wkts at 31.70
  • 2330 T20 runs at 24.78

 On many a Sunday, I realize that people have looked at the stories they've seen throughout the week with different lenses. I have my own personal take on some of these issues and I will share them with you. Welcome to #INCASEYOUMISSEDIT

  

Mental exhaustion or not enough effort on the field?

  England beat the West Indies by 269 runs and took the series 2-1 to reclaim the Wisden Trophy forever. Windies captain Jason Holder, speaking at the end of the third Test, said, “It’s been challenging, it’s been really challenging, mentally some of the guys are a bit worn out.”

Though I agree it is difficult to play any sport during a pandemic and acknowledge the upheaval, surrounding social injustice issues, taking place, to simply attribute the Windies poor result to these issues is unacceptable. I agree the current climate is different than what anyone has ever experienced before but the Windies loss was brought about by a lack of team effort on the field.

Holder went on to say, “It could be this way for a little while, so we’ve got to find ways to make it work. Hopefully, things could ease up throughout the world and probably guys can get out of the hotel a little bit more, but it has been challenging for sure.”

 Each match was played behind closed doors with players unable to feed off the crowd’s energy.  While I agree that the conditions in which they played were not ideal, as professional athletes they knew the job at hand was to retain the Wisden trophy and play smart cricket. 

The Windies made a great start to their tour with a win, at the Rose Bowl, but England found form in Manchester. The shortcomings of the Windies batsmen in English conditions were exposed numerous times. They conceded first-innings leads of 182 in the second test and 172 in the series decider. The most discouraging factor was the batsmen's inability to capitalize on the numerous starts that they got as a few of the batsmen did make half-centuries. The key difference between both squads was when England got opportunities, they went big, for example, Ben Stokes and Dom Sibley.

England’s bowlers were fresh and eager throughout and that ensured their dominance of the series. A key factor in England’s success was the class of bowlers that were available to choose from as well as the effective rotation of those bowlers. It was useful that none of England’s bowlers bowled in more than two matches – not even Ben Stokes and Dom Bess, who played every game but were not required to bowl.  In the case of the Windies, our bowlers were overworked and two of our key bowlers most notably, Shannon Gabriel and Jason Holder, were struggling with niggles.

Though the mental strain of being away from their families and playing the game during the pandemic may have affected the Windies players’ performance, I don’t believe is it the main reason they lost the series.

 

Arsenal has aced the recipe for FA Cup success

Arsenal boss Mikel Arteta is hoping the FA Cup victory on Saturday will convince captain Pierre Emerick Aubameyang to stay at the club after they beat Chelsea 2-1. The Gunners captain scored twice to seal the win, taking his team to a 14th FA Cup success. Aubameyang has less than a year left on his contract and his future at the club has been a topic of discussion.

On Saturday, when Aubameyang dropped the trophy before raising it above his head, Arteta joked, “He needs more experience with trophies, we can get him more used to that.” Chelsea’s manager Frank Lampard also commended Aubameyang on his match-winning performance. The North Londoners have now landed a spot in UEFA’s second-tier competition next season. 

This triumph has rectified some of the problems Arsenal had this season, especially after finishing 8th in the Premier League.

 

 The TKR captaincy fits Polly

Kieron Pollard will continue to lead the Trinbago Knight Riders for CPL 2020. Last year, Pollard replaced Dwayne Bravo as captain after he was ruled out with a finger injury.  The decision was a beneficial one and a team with a fit Bravo and Pollard can yield success.

Bravo, who led the team to three CPL titles previously, expressed to the owner that he would rather focus on his game, while Pollard leads the team. I think it is a perfect fit for the team as Pollard and Bravo are great friends and a healthy Bravo with Pollard at the helm puts TKR in a position to win another CPL title.

Pollard has scored 1759 runs in 70 matches, at a strike rate of 148.56. He is the 6th highest run-scorer in the history of the tournament. With the ball, Bravo is the leading wicket-taker with 97 scalps in 69 games. Together both players can use their individual achievements and personalities to get the best of the unit as they seek a 4th CPL title.

West Indies vice-captain Kraigg Brathwaite points to the second morning of the third and decisive Test against England as being crucial after a partnership between Ollie Pope and Jos Buttler wrested their early advantage on Friday at Old Trafford.

England are in a good position, having ended the day on 258-4, a far cry from the 122-4 they were in when Buttler came to the crease.

Before that, Kemar Roach had removed second-Test century-maker, Dom Sibley, for a duck, trapping him leg before wicket in the first over of the day.

Then came the run out of Joe Root for 17, Roston Chase clipping the bales.

Ben Stokes and opener Rory Burns tried to fashion a recovery before the latter was pushed back with some short deliveries before being bowled by Roach for 20.

The West Indies were looking good with England at 92-3, and when Burns was caught brilliantly at slip by Rahkeem Cornwall off the bowling of Roston Chase for 57, the West Indies were in great shape with two new batsmen and England teetering at 122-4.

But that’s where it ended as Pope, 91, and Buttler, 56, saw out the day in relative comfort, their partnership now worth 136.  

“I thought we started very well. Obviously Buttler and Pope had a good partnership, they batted well and so we know we have some hard work come tomorrow,” said Brathwaite in a press conference following stumps.

While Pope and Buttler have rescued England from a precarious position, Brathwaite does not believe the game has gotten away from the West Indies and tomorrow brings a fresh opportunity.

“We had a plan and obviously to bowl first but it’s been a pretty even day and obviously good from the two at the crease but I think tomorrow we have to start well and look to limit them to as few as possible,” said Brathwaite.

While tomorrow’s morning session is important, Brathwaite says the West Indies won’t panic and will stick to their plans and be patient.

“We have to start well and by that I mean we don’t have to rush wickets. I think if we build pressure by bowling a lot of dot balls and no boundary balls, that will create pressure to bring wickets. We don’t have to rush it in the morning session, I believe once we keep it tight, the tightness will bring wickets,” he said.

Last week I suggested England’s ben Stokes was close to overtaking Jason Holder as the number one allrounder in the world, despite Holder’s heroics in the first #raisethebat Series Test at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton.

This week Stokes confirmed my suspicions.

Stokes scored a couple of 40-odds and took 4-49 and 2-39, the most wickets for England, in that first Test, but still, Holder’s six-for put him ahead, even though the latter had a very ordinary outing with the bat.

I have consistently thought Stokes, over the course of his career, displays the better all-round ability, though Holder clearly wins in the bowling department.

Now, after two Tests of a three-Test series, Stokes has shown, with both bat and ball, he may very well be the greatest allrounder of the modern era.

After the second Test, Stokes duly took his place as the number-one Test allrounder in the world.

I agree with that.

Stokes is a complete allrounder.

In that second Test between England and the West Indies at Old Trafford, Stokes was in full flight.

He began the Test with 176, then broke the back of the West Indies innings when he had Kraigg Brathwaite caught and bowled for 75.

Stokes would continue to impact the Test in no uncertain terms, scoring a bruising 78 not out from just 57 deliveries to give England a platform from which they could bowl at the West Indies.

Stokes’ 2-30 when the West Indies bat was crucial, as he was the man who bounced out Jermaine Blackwood who had scored a classy 55 just before tea on the final day. I believe that was the wicket that ensured England their 113-run victory. He also proved the undoing of Alzarri Joseph, who has already proven a capable lower-order batsman.

I have always felt that an allrounder on the biggest stage in cricket is not just someone who is ok in all areas. These are professional cricketers and by and large, they’ll be ok at anything they do.

But an allrounder, I believe, to be classified as such, should be excellent in all areas.

A player who bowls well and bats a bit, for me, is not an allrounder. A player, who bats well and bowls a bit is not an allrounder either. Those are just cricketers. Maybe better cricketers than their peers, who only do one thing, but just cricketers nonetheless.

Jason Holder is a good cricketer.

He is no mug with the bat as his double century against England in Bridgetown, Barbados last year goes to prove. But Holder, for me is a bowler at this point in his career.

When I watch him bat, I see potential. He seems to be competent against spin as well as pace and has an uncanny way of seeming unhurried when he plays.

When I watch him bowl though, I see a bowler who can compete with the best in the world.

He is a fantastic bowler.

Standing at 6’ 7” I wish he were quicker, but at his pace, he generates bounce, movement and can be quite aggressive when he needs to be. His accuracy is phenomenal and I’ve watched him develop the perfect wrist positions to do exactly what he wants with the ball.

Holder’s ascent to the number two position among bowlers in Test cricket is no accident.

But, for me, that does not make him an allrounder.

Could he make the West Indies team as purely a batsman? He certainly could as a bowler.

Stokes, on the other hand, makes the England side in any capacity.

If he were unable to bat, the strength of his bowling, though not in Holder’s class, I don’t think, would give him a place in the England line-up.

He is certainly a key cog as a batsman and could play as solely that if he could not bowl.

In fact, I go as far as to say, Stokes is England’s best batsmen and he is the bowler who breaks the back of big partnerships.

Talking about fielding is a nonstarter since both Stokes and Holder are excellent fielders.

But, I think, by now you get my point.

With the bat, Holder is too mediocre at this stage of his career to really call him an allrounder, but there is hope.

I believe if Holder puts in the same kind of work into his batting that he does his bowling and this is difficult because he is captain of the West Indies, I believe he could become a real true-to-life allrounder.

Excellent at all things cricket.

Ben Stokes’ bruising 78 from just 57 deliveries took the second Test at Old Trafford away from the West Indies, who, with 214 runs in arrears and eight England wickets to try and get, had the slightest of chances on day five.

Stokes slammed four fours and three sixes to lead England to 129-3 from just 19 overs of batting. The innings gave England two things, runs and time.

It made sure they got 85 overs to bowl at the West Indies, as well as a fair number of runs to act as a buffer in case they couldn’t get 10 wickets.

Speaking about the innings, West Indies coach, Phil Simmons, said he was not surprised, but he was disappointed because the West Indies got a chance to stop the carnage early out.

When Stokes was on 29, John Campbell, fielding at deep extra-cover, floored a chance off Shannon Gabriel, that may have changed the course of the game.

“The thing about him is that we know he can do that. And if you go out and drop him within six balls of the start, well then you’ve got problems then,” said Simmons.

“I think it was our doing that he got the opportunity to go on and show what he’s made of and we know what he’s made of.”

England, thanks to an all-round bowling performance would go on to win by 113 runs, bowling out the West Indies for 198, with Shamarh Brooks, 62, Jermaine Blackwood, 55, and Jason Holder, 35, the main contributors.

The #raisethebat Series for the Wisden Trophy now lies at 1-1 with the series decider on Friday at the same venue.

West Indies coach Phil Simmons has pinpointed five or six overs during the course of the second Test in the #raisethebat Series at Old Trafford, that were the catalyst for the visitors ending 113-run losers.

The West Indies are in danger of losing the second Test in #raisethebat Series at Old Trafford, in Manchester.

At lunch on the final day, the West Indies have already lost their openers and Shai Hope with just 25 runs on the board but more importantly, still with 74 overs to face and 287 runs to get.

England only batted for 11 overs of the morning session as Ben Stokes went into limited-overs mode to help them push their lead to 311 before a declaration 11 overs into the day.

Stokes was unbeaten on 78 off 57 balls as England declared on 129-3, giving the hosts 85 overs to bowl out the West Indies and tie the three-match series at 1-1. They will have two new balls to get the victory.

Any result looks possible on the final day — as was the case in the first Test in Southampton last week, when the Windies won by four wickets after chasing down 200 for victory.

West Indies' aim will likely be survival, though, with the victory target of 312 unlikely.

Stokes smashed two sixes over long-off as the big-hitting allrounder and England captain Joe Root put on 53 runs in the first 43 balls of the morning before Root was run out for 22 — effectively sacrificing his own wicket to get Stokes back on strike.

Now alongside Ollie Pope (12 not out), Stokes still had time to slog Jason Holder down the ground for another six, pushing the lead past 300, before Root called them back in.

By then, England had made 92 runs off 66 balls.

The second new ball will be available for England after 80 overs.

John Campbell, 4, was the first to go, going caught behind off the bowling of Stuart Broad, while his opening partner Kraigg Brathwaite was trapped on the crease off the bowling of Chris Woakes for 12.

Shai Hope’s struggles with the bat have also continued as Broad got a delivery to nip back at him, taking the top of off stump, with the batsman hapless after his decision to play back to a fullish delivery.

Roston Chase, yest to score, and Shamarh Brooks, 2, are the batsmen at the crease.

The West Indies performed admirably with the ball and in the field, despite a 162-over-long sojourn thanks to some dogged batting from England after two days of the second #raisethebat Test at Old Trafford on Friday.

England skipper Joe Root gave the signal to declare the innings on 469-9 just about an hour before close of play but before that, the side’s vice-captain, Ben Stokes, 176, and opener Dom Dibley, 120, made the West Indies toil.

Chase, himself, bowled a mammoth 44 overs to claim 5-143, while pacers Kemar Roach, 2-58, Alzarri Joseph and Holder, 1-70, offered support with their wickets.

In reply, the West Indies have already lost the services of John Campbell, after Sam Curran trapped him leg before for 12. Opener Kraigg Brathwaite, 6, and Joseph, the night watchman, 14, are the batsmen at the crease, with the West Indies 32-1.

“Most teams being out there for 160-odd overs you would begin to see the tiredness and the lines and lengths start to go wrong, but we didn’t let it get away from us. We still kept the run rate to under three and that was our aim from the beginning,” said Chase.

A large part of that were the 32 overs bowled by Roach. The pacer went at a miserly 1.76 runs per over even though he didn’t get among the wickets til late in the day when he had Stokes caught behind attempting a reverse sweep, and Woakes caught at slip with a peach of a delivery with the very next ball.

“We didn’t get wickets in clusters or really fast like we did in the first game but we stuck to the game plan and stuck to the task,” said Chase.

The West Indies were in for a surprise after believing they could get the most out of the wicket on day one under gloomy skies and with some moisture from rainy days still affecting the pitch.

“I thought the conditions played a big role in us deciding to bowl first. Outside was very overcast and dark, the lights were on before play even started, and having the success we had in the first game as well, everyone was down for the decision to bowl first. But as I said, the English batters played tremendously so kudos to them,” said Chase.

There were a few instances when things looked to be falling apart for the West Indies toward the end of the England innings.

Roach dropped a catch, pushing his effort over the ropes for six, Shannon Gabriel missed an easy run out, having caught the return but failed to make contact with the stumps, as well as a couple of other misfields.

Those instances, though, Chase explained are bound to occur after such a long time in the field.

We made a few blunders in the field which is going to happen when you’re out there for that long because your body is under tremendous strain but all in all I think it was a good effort from the guys,” said Chase.

Roston Chase believes the West Indies are still very much in their Test match against England at Old Trafford despite playing catchup on the first two days of the team’s second encounter in the #raisethebat Series.

Under overcast skies West Indies captain Jason Holder had chosen to bowl first, only to see his much-vaunted pace-bowling attack repelled by dogged English batting that kept his side in the field for 162 overs and the better part of two days.

Architects of the English first-innings total of 469-9 declared were the side’s vice-captain, Ben Stokes, 176, and opener Dom Dibley, 120.

To help keep the run-scoring in check, Chase bowled a mammoth 44 overs to claim 5-143, while pacers Kemar Roach, 2-58, Alzarri Joseph and Holder, 1-70, offered support with their wickets.

In reply, the West Indies have already lost the services of John Campbell, after Sam Curran trapped him leg before for 12. Opener Kraigg Brathwaite, 6, and Joseph, the night watchman, 14, are the batsmen at the crease, with the West Indies 32-1.

Despite the setback, Chase believes the West Indies have the tools to overhaul England’s total.

“I would never say that the 400 and odd is beyond us with the talent of the players that we have,” he said in a post-match conference on Friday.

Chase does recognize though, that batting on the third day may provide different challenges to the ones the English batsmen managed to navigate on the first two days.

“I would say that the wicket is slower than in that first innings when the ball was skidding on, so you have to give yourself time to adjust,” said Chase.

Even with that fact, however, Chase is still optimistic about his side’s chances, even though the odds of an England win stand at 70%.

“But I am backing our players to get the total or even close to it and then put them in a place where they have to decide what they are going to do,” said Chase.

Odds for the game ending in a draw now stand at 28% with a West Indies victory at this stage at a mere 2%.

The West Indies lead the three-Test series 1-0 and only need a draw to secure their hold on the Wisden Trophy.

Centuries from Dom Sibley and Ben Stokes Friday helped England press home their advantage over the West Indies by tea on day two of the second Test at Old Trafford.

England were 264-3 at the end of a wicketless first session in which the hosts added 57 runs in 26 overs — the kind of rate that took Test cricket back to the old days.

Sibley beat Stokes in their painstaking crawls to the milestone, bringing up his second Test hundred with a straight drive for three runs about 10 minutes before lunch. The opener gave a big fist pump to celebrate his 312-ball century, England's fifth slowest since 1990.

Sibley would hole out to Roston Chase for 120 in the second session as he tried to push the scoring.

Stokes, in the meantime, had stepped on the accelerator after lunch when he went to three figures. By tea, Stokes was 172 and England were 378-5.

Again it was Chase who moved the needle for the West Indies, trapping Ollie Pope for just seven.

At the crease with Stokes is Jos Buttler on 12.

Chase now has figures of 4-106, while the West Indies had to do without Alzarri Joseph, the other wicket-taker, for part of the day after the pacer complained of tri-cep pain. Joseph has figures of 1-70.

West Indies vice-captain, Kraigg Brathwaite said his side would not panic despite a strong showing from England on the first day of their second Test in the #RaiseTheBat series at Old Trafford, Manchester on Thursday.

The West Indies are leading their three-Test series against England 1-0 thanks in large part to their skipper Jason Holder.

In just his sixth Test, Jermaine Blackwood showed class in scoring a century against England all the way back in 2015.

Two and a half years later, Blackwood had been dropped, having never made the three-figure mark in another innings.

In those two and a half fairly barren years, nobody doubted Blackwood’s talent. But everybody doubted his temperament.

He seemed too willing to throw his wicket away. Now Blackwood is back with the West Indies squad and despite scoring a duck in the first practice game before his side again takes on the might of the English in England, the Jamaican swears by the changes he has made to his game.

“I want to add a little bit more to my game and bat time. I'm really pushing hard for that and I'm really putting the mental work as well in, to bat time, Blackwood has said.

Once I bat time, I will score runs

He has not played Test cricket for two and a half years but he says: “This opportunity has come out and I have to grab it with both hands. I have something to go out there and prove against all the best bowlers in the world, I want to score runs against them."

Back in 2015, on a final day North Sound pitch, Blackwood’s West Indies faced a first-innings total from England of 399 thanks in large part to Ian Bell’s 143, Joe Root’s 83 and Ben Stokes’ 79.

The West Indies would end up well short of that total, scoring 295 in their reply but Blackwood’s innings got them close and helped the hosts stay in the contest and eventually come out with a draw.

Uncharacteristically, Blackwood was measured in his approach to the innings, batting for more than five and a half hours and facing 220 deliveries for an unbeaten 112.

Shivnarine Chanderpaul, 46, Kraigg Brathwaite, 39, and Marlon Samuels, 33, were the only other batsmen who offered any resistance to a bowling attack that read James Anderson, 2-67, Stuart Broad, 2-67, Chris Jordan, 1-46 and James Tredwell, 4-47.

Despite the quality of the bowling attack, Blackwood was not troubled, navigating the bowlers with skill beyond his years. After all, this was just his sixth Test match.

It would take 14 boundaries and two sixes for Blackwood to bring up his tally, the most classy of which was a straight hit off the bowling of Stokes.

But the signs of Blackwood’s nature were there even in that innings. While he showed good patience for much of the innings, the day could have ended earlier, as Blackwood did have some fortune.

He was caught off a no-ball from Ben Stokes on 21 and dropped at slip on 43, granted that chance was tough.

He was also peppered with short balls and even hit on the forearm, but Blackwood would stay put throughout, emerging from long slumbers of defending to audacious moments of attack.

If only there were more moments like that when the diminutive Jamaican would find that which is most needed in Test cricket, balance. He says he understands what to do these days, let’s wait to see if there is more in him like he managed to pull out on those fateful first two days of Test cricket all the way back in 2015.

Former West Indies captain Darren Sammy has revealed that words uttered by all-rounder Ben Stokes had fired up batsman Marlon Samuels, who put on an outstanding display to help the team clinch the 2016 T20 World Cup.

Big hitter Carlos Brathwaite stole the spotlight with four straight sixes off the unfortunate Stokes in the final over, but at the other end, Samuels’ man-of-the-match 85 runs from 66 balls innings provided the backbone for the team.

According to Sammy, Samuels who came to the crease at 11 for 3 and with things looking grim for the Windies, revealed he had received added motivation.

“Marlon told us something, and maybe Root could confirm that when Marlon came in at 11-3. He came to bowl and he said something like ‘you guys, I would like to see you come out of this one’ and Marlon was just taking his time, making sure that comment, whatever he (Ben Stokes) said to him as he walked in, that got him really focused,” Sammy said in a recent interview with Sky Sports’ Cricket Watch in a segment that discussed the tournament.  England batsman Joe Root, the team’s vice-captain at the time, did not seem convinced Samuels was telling the truth.

“It would have been a good effort because Ben was at long-on, so I don’t know how that happened. He might have just made it up,” Root added.

Sticking to his guns, Sammy insisted that the event was quite possible.

“When he was bowling to him, Ben Stokes was bowling an over to him and he said something to Marlon during that time. Because Marlon told us about it. He was really pumped. If you notice, in the back end, Marlon said something to him after that. But it’s all cricket man.”

It is hard to believe Ben Stokes is only 28 years old. Already, he is shaping up to be the greatest allrounder England has ever produced. Stokes has had to show real character to get where he has, after two setbacks in his career that could have broken a lesser young man. Against the West Indies in the T20 World Cup in 2014, Stokes was the unfortunate bowler who Carlos Brathwaite took for four sixes on the trot to give the eventual champions an unlikely victory.

Then Stokes missed the 2017-18 Ashes because he was charged with ‘affray’ after a brawl at a Bristol nightclub. Stokes turned those two misfortunes around. In the first instance, winning the World Cup with England in remarkable fashion after scoring an unbeaten 84 before winning a super over in dramatic fashion.

He recovered from the setback of missing the Ashes England lost 4-0 by helping England thrash Sri Lanka 3-0 in a Test series months later. Stokes is involved in every aspect of what England does well. His combative personality along with undeniable skill make for comparisons with Ian Botham that are not unfounded. He averages 36.54 in Tests and has already scored more than 4,000 runs. Stokes has also racked up 147 wickets at an average of 32.68.

He registers as a fast-medium, but when he’s up he can be outright quick. When he’s batting he can go from stodgy defence when situations are tight to unleashing the most furious assaults on bowling attacks. Stokes for all intents is a man for all seasons.

Career Statistics

Full name: Benjamin Andrew Stokes

Born: June 4, 1991, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Major teams: England, Canterbury, Durham, Durham 2nd XI, England Development Programme Under-19s, England Lions, England Performance Programme, England Performance Programme XI, England Under-19s, Melbourne Renegades, Rajasthan Royals, Rising Pune Supergiant

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

 

Test Career (Batting): England (2013-present)

Mat    Inns    NO      Runs    HS     Ave        BF      SR      100s    50s  

63       115       4       4056    258    36.54    6905    58.74       9       21  

Test Career (Bowling): England (2013-present)

Mat    Inns    Balls    Runs    Wkts   BBI     BBM     Ave    Econ   SR     4w     5w    10w

63       106     8683    4804     147     6/22    8/161   32.68   3.31   59.0     5       4       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Fastest 250 in Tests (196 balls)
  • Most runs in a Test innings at number six (258)
  • Most runs in 1st session of a Test (130)
  • 1 of 7 players to score over 4000 runs and take 100 wickets in Tests
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