Steve Smith believes playing in the Indian Premier League later this year would be an enjoyable alternative option if the T20 World Cup is postponed.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) last week stated it is still planning for the World Cup to start in Australia on October 18, but other options are being explored due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It has been reported that the competition will be put back to next year, with the IPL - which could not get under way as scheduled in March - taking place instead of the global event.

Smith, who returned to training with New South Wales on Monday, would prefer to play in a World Cup, but the former Australia captain would also relish the opportunity to lead the Rajasthan Royals later this year. 

The top-ranked Test batsman in the world said: "I think when you're playing for your country at a World Cup, that's the pinnacle for one-day or T20 cricket, so of course I'd prefer to play in that.

"But if that doesn't happen and the IPL's there, and they postpone [the T20 World Cup], then so be it. IPL's also a terrific tournament as a domestic tournament. 

"That's out of everyone's control at the moment, players are just doing what we're told and going where we need to go and playing whatever's on at that stage.

"I guess there'll be some more news about it soon, probably some decisions to be made soon, so I'm sure we'll all find out and know where we're going to be.

"I personally haven't really thought about it, I think it'd just be going off the advice of the professionals and the governments and essentially doing what we're told.

"If that happens then great, if not then there's just so much going on in the world right now that cricket kind of seems a little bit irrelevant. So, we'll get back when we're told to and until then it's sit tight, get fit and strong and freshen up mentally."

Cricket Australia are also considering a request from the England and Wales Cricket Board to tour England for a limited-overs series in September, two months later than planned.

Cricket Australia (CA) is braced for a huge financial hit due to the possible postponement of the ICC Twenty20 World Cup, as well as playing home games without spectators. 

Speaking to the media on Friday, CA chief executive Kevin Roberts predicted the governing body stands to miss out on 80million Australian dollars due to the potential changes caused by the coronavirus pandemic. 

Admitting there is a “very high risk” of the global T20 tournament being pushed back from the original plan of October and November this year, Roberts outlined the expected missed income due to such a delay. 

However, the bigger blow is a home summer without any fans present at international fixtures, while there is also the extra cost of the biosecurity measures required to host opposing teams. 

"The likelihood of significant crowds is very slim - ordinarily that would deliver well over $50m revenue to CA," Roberts told reporters. 

"The T20 World Cup is a big question and that's a factor of perhaps $20m. We have been hopeful all along that it could be staged in October-November, but you would have to say there's a very high risk about the prospect of that happening. 

"And it's likely that our biosecurity measures that we need to put in place to deliver the season will cost in the order of $10m." 

Australia are due to host Zimbabwe in one-day internationals in August, then West Indies arrive for T20 games in October. As for Tests, Afghanistan are due to play one in Perth in November, followed by a four-match series against India, who complete their tour with three ODIs in January. 

New Zealand are the final visitors of a packed schedule, making the short trip for three one-dayers and a one-off T20 early next year. 

On the recently released schedule, Roberts remained cautiously optimistic, adding: “We're very optimistic that we will be able to stage the India men's tour and the other inbound tours for the season. 

"But we're realistic enough to know they will look very different to a normal summer. We have been forced to effectively plan for the worst and hope for the best." 

Mr Cricket, Michael Hussey’s rise to the international ranks took place belatedly, with the middle-order batsman earning a call to Australia’s One-Day International (ODI) team in 2004 when he was just two months shy of his 29th birthday. But once he got there, his attitude to everything cricket was tremendous. That attitude meant he ended with a healthy career average of 48, rarely failing to bolster the Australian middle-order. Without aiming for the big shots over the top, Hussey scored at a brisk 87.16, running between the wickets hard and never failing to find the gaps in the field. He was as busy at the crease as he was on the field, always keeping an intensity that the rest of the Australian setup fed from. In truth, Hussey was an opener but was pushed down the order in the Australian line-up. That too was accepted with the same professionalism he approached everything. Centuries were not a regular feature of Hussey’s career, not because he didn’t have a penchant for batting for long periods, but because he generally bat with the lower order and wasn’t given the time. Still, he scored three centuries, including 109 not out against the West Indies at the Kinrara Academy Oval in 2006. He would also score 105 against New Zealand in 2007 and fell a run short of his unbeaten highest against Bangladesh in 2011.

  

Career Statistics

Full name: Michael Edward Killeen Hussey

Born: May 27, 1975, Mt Lawley, Perth, Western Australia

Major teams: Australia, Chennai Super Kings, Durham, Gloucestershire, Mumbai Indians, Northamptonshire, St Lucia Zouks, Sydney Thunder, Western Australia

Playing role: Middle-order batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Height: 1.80 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (2004-2012)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave      BF       SR      100s    50s    4s      6s   

185     157      44     5442      109*   48.15    6243   87.16       3      39     383     80   

 

Career Highlights

  • 2007 ICC world Cup winner
  • The top-ranked ODI batsman in the world in 2006
  • Scored 3 centuries and 39 fifties
  • Scored 5,442 runs at an average of 48.15

The West Indies are set to play Australia in three T20 Internationals in October, Cricket Australia has announced.

The Ultimate XI ODI Edition’s discussions have started with a bang, as George Davis of the SportsMax Zone and the selection panel got into it over who should make the final six from the shortlist of openers.

There wasn’t much opposition as the Panel cut the West Indies’ Desmond Haynes from the shortlist on the first day, neither was there much of a stir when Matthew Hayden, the man who starts as opener in the Ultimate Test XI, was asked to go.

There were, however, a few ripples when Adam Gilchrist, a man who has three World-Cup-winning innings under his belt, was told he didn’t stack up well enough to make the final six players to be discussed on the Zone today.

However, major rifts developed when Sanath Jayasuriya did not find favour with two of the three panellists.

With two-thirds objecting to his appearance in today’s final, Jayasuriya had to go.

According to the voting so far, the panel, despite George Sylvester Davis’s appeals for a reconsideration, have called it right when it comes to Jayasuriya.

The Fanalysts don’t seem to think as much of Tillakaratne Dilshan or Hashim Amla as does the panel though, as they have Sourav Ganguly, Gilchrist, Haynes, and Jayasuriya, joining those two in the bottom six. The Fanalysts have also added New Zealand’s Martin Guptill to the list of those they don’t think can make it. Haynes and Gilchrist are in a statistical dead heat for one of the bottom six places.

Now here’s the truth about Jayasuriya. In partnership with Romesh Kaluwitharana, Jayasuriya is the man that made the massive totals of ODIs today possible. Thumping the ball to all parts of the ground in the first 15 overs, Jayasuriya made the work of his middle-order that much easier, as they could afford to run singles and keep the scoreboard ticking over with the expectation that normal batting would give them big scores.   

Now, if you believe, like I do, that there are some crazy Fanalysts out there, you can help change the conversation with your vote.

Fanalysts votes count heavily in deciding who makes the cut as the group holds the largest percentage weight when the votes are tallied.

The panel’s decision counts for 30 per cent of votes, while the Zone gets another 30. The Fanalysts benefit from a 10 per cent bump, giving you real sway in the conversation.

To vote for your Ultimate XI go to SportsMax.tv and click on the banner or go straight to this link.

Adam Gilchrist made his international debut in ODIs as a wicketkeeper against South Africa in 1996. He started his career in a similar manner to Tendulkar, coming lower down the order. He made some useful contributions there, however in the day and age of pinch-hitters – or batsmen who could take advantage of the fielding restrictions – he was sent to open the innings. That changed everything. He went on to score his maiden century in his very second match at the top of the order against South Africa in Sydney.

Glenn McGrath, Brett Lee could have been a nightmare for other wicketkeepers but Gilly was safe as houses behind the wickets. Then there was arguably the greatest leg spinner the world has ever seen, Shane Warne. Gilly was equally safe while wicketkeeping for the great spinner as well. He hardly dropped catches and helped Australia win by turning those half chances into wickets.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Adam Craig Gilchrist

Born: November 14, 1971, Bellingen, New South Wales

Major teams: Australia, Deccan Chargers, ICC World XI, Kings XI Punjab, Middlesex, New South Wales, Western Australia

Playing role: Wicketkeeper-batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

Height: 1.86 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (1996–2008)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave     BF        SR       100s    50s    4s      6s      Ct      St

287     279      11     9619     172    35.89   9922    96.94      16     55      1162   149    417     55

 

Career Highlights

  • Holds record for most catches by a wicketkeeper in an ODI innings (6)
  • Second when paired with Glenn McGrath for most successful bowler/wicketkeeper combinations with 72 dismissals.
  • First and fourth on list with most dismissals in a calendar year 56 catches and 9 stumpings in 1999 and 53 catches and 3 stumpings in 2003.
  • Named in Australia's "greatest ever ODI team”
  • One of three players to have won three World Cup titles
  • Second most centuries by an ODI wicketkeeper (16)
  • Record for scoring at least 50 runs in successive CWC finals (1999, 2003, 2007)
  • Fastest century in a World Cup final
  • Highest ever score in a World Cup final (149) Barbados, 2007

Brutally aggressive with the bat, powerful and agile on the field and deceptively dangerous with the ball, Symonds was the ultimate limited-overs package. Although his career didn't span a long time, he did enough during his stay in international cricket to make his presence felt, his performances announcing him as a pure matchwinner for Australia. He was so sensational on the field, Ricky Ponting once declared Symonds the greatest fielder he had ever seen.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Andrew Symonds

Born: 9 June 1975 (age 44), Birmingham, England

Height: 187 cm (6 ft 2 in)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm medium, Right-arm off-break

Playing role: All-rounder

 

ODI Career (batting): Australia (1998-2009)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave      BF          SR      100    50     4s      6s      Ct      

198      161     33     5088     156    39.75   5504       92.44      6     30     449    103    82     

 

ODI Career (bowling): Australia (1998-2009)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs     Wkts   BBI     BBM    Ave    Econ   SR      4w     5w     10w

198     158     5935   4955       133    5/18    5/18    37.25  5.00    44.6      2       1         0

 

Career Highlights

  • Scored at a strike rate of more than 90
  • Named in the ICC World ODI XI in 2005, 2008
  • 12th man ICC World ODI XI in 2006
  • Scored 6 hundreds and 30 half-centuries in ODIs
  • Averaged 39.75 batting in ODIs
  • He scored 5,088 runs and picked up 133 wickets

World Rugby has ruled out the possibility of holding an international invitational tournament in the United Kingdom and Ireland in 2021 to provide relief following the coronavirus pandemic.

Former Rugby Football Union chief executive Francis Baron had proposed the one-off 16-team competition to raise money "for keeping the game of rugby alive around the world", with sport suspended in recent months due to the global crisis.

The event, held in the UK in order to avoid disrupting France's 2023 Rugby World Cup preparations, would see 31 matches across June and July and prompt the postponement of the British and Irish Lions' tour of South Africa.

The suggested tournament - dubbed the 'Coronavirus Cup of World Rugby' as Baron revealed his plan to the Telegraph - would reportedly aim to bring in up to £250million to support the sport as it recovers from the pandemic.

However, the  idea has been dismissed by governing body World Rugby.

A statement read: "World Rugby notes a proposal by former RFU CEO Francis Baron suggesting the organisation of a major international rugby event in the UK in 2021 to alleviate the impact of COVID-19 on global rugby.

"World Rugby does not intend to pursue such a proposal.

"All stakeholders continue to progress productive discussions regarding the immediate global COVID-19 financial relief strategy and international rugby calendar optimisation, both of which will further the success of Rugby World Cup 2023 in France."

World Rugby has already postponed all July Tests and set aside a $100million relief fund in a bid to assist those struggling the most.

The Ultimate Test XI is done and the fans have made their votes count, overruling a panel of experts and the SportsMax Zone to pick two spinners in their line-up.

From jump street, the fans looked as if they would not be swayed by the opinions of the Zone and the panel, who had to get their ducks in a row if they wanted the final say on who makes SportsMax’s Ultimate XI.

Whereas all were agreed that India’s Sunil Gavaskar was probably the greatest opener the world has ever seen as was a shoo-in for the first opening spot on offer, the fans disagreed with the panel and the Zone on the other opener. Hands down, Fanalysts believed Gordon Greenidge, despite boasting a lower average than most in the Ultimate XI Test shortlist, was the man for the job.

The Fanalysts were outvoted as the Zone, who had 30% of all votes and the panel, who had another 30, believed Australia’s Matthew Hayden the man to walk to the crease in partnership with Gavaskar.

Then there were other differences of opinion. According to the panel, the greatest middle-order batsmen of all time, read Brian Lara, Sachin Tendulkar, and Sir Vivian Richards.

The Zone team, despite being made up of solely Caribbean journalists, disagreed. Sir Viv, they said could not fill the third spot in that middle order ahead of an Australian, Sir Donald Bradman.

The Fanalysts agreed and put the weight of their 40% of the vote squarely behind the Australian great.

So now the fans missed out on one of their picks for opener and the panel missed out on one of their picks for a middle-order batsman.

At the allrounder position and the wicketkeeper position, there was unison as Fanalysts, Zone and panel believed Sir Garfield Sobers should fill the former position, while Australia’s Adam Gilchrist is the best the world has ever seen don gloves.

It is in the bowling category that the most controversy was expected and that’s where the most variance occurred.

According to the Zone, Malcolm Marshall, Curtly Ambrose, Wasim Akram and Muttiah Muralitharan would provide the greatest bowling attack the world has ever seen.

The panel disagreed.

The panel, believed Marshall a shoo-in, New Zealand’s Sir Richard Hadlee could not be left out, and South Africa’s Dale Steyn was the final pacer to make up a bowling attack that had one spinner in Muttiah Muralitharan.

Hadlee never stood a chance for the Fanalysts, and neither did Steyn for that matter.

For the Fanalysts, a choice between Muralitharan and Warne, the two bowlers with the most wickets in the history of Test cricket, was too difficult to make and they picked both.

That left space for just two pacers and the all-West-Indian pairing of Marshall and Ambrose was the obvious choice.

With 30 per cent of the vote going to Hadlee, and another 30 per cent going to Steyn, Warne easily made his way into the Ultimate XI with the Fanalysts offering him up with their 40.

Based on all the Ultimate XI profiles have told you about these players, tell us who was right.

Were the fans who got their way with Bradman and the two spinners right? Or is there something to be said for the experts who went with Hadlee and Steyn, or even the Zone, who decided on Akram?

Were the Fanalysts accurate in going against the grain with picking Greenidge ahead of Hayden, or were the Zone and the panel correct in overruling them?  

Crazy or not, we are trusting the Fanalysts again with our Ultimate XI ODI team. 

Check out the shortlist below, tell me who you would pick in the comments section on Facebook and Twitter then go and vote after we tell you how wrong you are. Voting begins later today after the SportsMax Zone on SportsMax.tv.

 

Probably the best player of the pull shot, Ponting played almost all the textbook shots to perfection.

He sits firmly enthroned as one of the all-time top Australian batsmen, with only Don Bradman and perhaps Greg Chappell and Allan Border claiming a comparable rank.

While his early days were marred by disciplinary issues and alcohol problems, he overcame them with talent and tenacity to stamp his greatness on the landscape of the game. And then the story was of piling up runs in the most dominating of manners. And when his job with the willow was over, he could prowl the outfield like a panther, swooping down on travelling balls and sending returns homing in on bull’s-eye.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Ricky Thomas Ponting

Born: 19 December 1974 (age 45), Launceston, Tasmania, Australia

Height: 1.75[1] m (5 ft 9 in)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Playing role: Batsman

 

ODI Career: Australia (1995–2012)

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs     HS   Ave    BF         SR      100s    50s   4s        6s  

375     365   39     13704    164  42.03  17046    80.39    30      82     1231    162

 

Career Highlights

  • Most capped captain in ODIs (230 matches)
  • Holds the record for scoring the most runs in ODIs as captain(8497)
  • First batsman to score centuries in ODI cricket against all Test-playing nations
  • He holds the record for the most Cricket World Cup matches played (46)
  • Third overall and the first Australian batsman to pass 13,000 One Day International runs
  • Most ODI runs by an Australian (13,704)
  • Most ODI centuries by an Australian (30)
  • Most centuries by an Australian in World Cups (5)
  • Undefeated as captain in World Cups (35 matches)
  • Equal most Cricket World Cups won as captain ( 2)

Regularly dubbed the world's best limited-overs batsman, Michael Bevan was an essential part of Australia’s one-day outfit for a decade, especially when orchestrating calm chases in crises that often ended in last-over or last-ball heroics.

He will long be remembered for his pair of sensational innings against West Indies at Sydney in 1996 and New Zealand at Melbourne in 2002, when nerveless batting and juggling of the tail secured nail-biting victories.

Picking the gaps, running hard and knowing the right moment - and place - to hit a boundary were the hallmarks of his success. He was also a fine fieldsman and his left-arm wrist spin, which swung from erratic to more than useful, added to his lure and allowed him to play Tests as a batting allrounder.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Michael Gwyl Bevan

Born: May 8, 1970, Belconnen, Australian Capital Territory

Major teams: Australia, Chennai Superstars, Kent, Leicestershire, New South Wales, South Australia, Sussex, Tasmania, Yorkshire

Playing role: Batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Height: 1.80 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (1994-2004)

Mat      Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR    100s        50s           4s        6s        

232        196        67           6912      108*      53.58     9320      74.16       6           46           450        21       

 

Career Highlights

  • Named as a batsman in Australia's "greatest ever ODI team."
  • He remained not out in 67 of his 196 ODI innings
  • ODI batting average never dropped below 50
  • Credited for initiating the art of finishing matches

In 2005, he was voted the "World's Scariest Batsman" in a poll of international bowlers. And, they would know after being the recipients of the remorseless and relentless savagery of this dexterous Western Australian destroyer. His strike-rate is amongst the highest in both Tests and ODIs.      

A big-stage player, Gilchrist is the only player to chalk up 50-plus scores in three successive World Cup finals – all three being match-winning efforts.         

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Adam Craig Gilchrist

Born: 14 November 1971 (age 48)

Place of birth: Bellingen, New South Wales, Australia

Height: 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)

Batting: Left-handed

Role: Wicket-keeper–batsman

 

ODI Career: Australia (1996–2008) 

Mat     Inns     NO    Runs      HS     Ave     BF         SR      100s    50s    4s       6s       Ct      St

287      279       11    9619       172   35.89    9922     96.94     16      55     1162    149     417     55

 

Career Highlights

  • Named Wisden Cricketer of the year in 2002
  • Won Allan Border medal in 2003.
  • One-Day International Player of the Year  2003
  • One-Day International Player of the Year - 2004
  • Walter Lawrence Trophy 2010

Matthew Hayden was admittedly a much better Test opener than ODI batsman, which is strange since power and aggression were the hallmarks of his batting. Joining the ranks of Australia’s more notable ODI openers took time, with Hayden going from averaging 25 in 1993 to 54 in 2002.

However, his form would dip from 2003 to 2005, when he averaged at highest, 41 in any calendar year. In 2004 he scored 946 runs in 23 games but just 482 in 16 the following season, and saw his average fall from 41.13 to 32.13. Australia’s selectors duly dropped him.

As his form in Test cricket improved, so did the expectation that he would do well again in the ODI team and the selectors were proven right. Hayden only played two ODIs in 2006, but his average of 51.50 in that year may have prompted a recall and he went to the 2007 World Cup in the Caribbean.

There he showed his worth,  where his domination had no equal. Hayden averaged 73.22 in the tournament, scoring 659 runs with a fractured toe and a broken bone in the other foot. His 66-ball century against South Africa earned him honorary citizenship in St Kitts. To boot, he lifted the World Cup for a second time. That year he played 26 ODIs, batting in 25 and averaged 62.18, his highest since 2002 when the six innings he played yielded 315 runs at an average of 105.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Matthew Lawrence Hayden

Born: October 29, 1971, Kingaroy, Queensland

Major teams: Australia, Brisbane Heat, Chennai Super Kings, Hampshire, ICC World XI, Northamptonshire, Queensland

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Height: 1.88 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (1993-2008)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS      Ave      BF        SR       100s    50s     4s      6s     

161     155     15      6133     181*   43.80    7767    78.96      10      36      636     87    

 

Career Highlights

  • Former Australia record holder for highest ODI score (181*)
  • 5th fastest century at a World Cup (66 balls)
  • 3 centuries at 2007 World Cup, highest run-getter
  • ODI player of the year 2007

Legendary West Indies fast bowler Curtly Ambrose was typically content to let the ball do the talking but recently recalled an occasion when he was tempted to let his fists answer a few questions of their own.

Dave Rennie is set to start work as Australia head coach ahead of schedule as Danny Wilson will take charge of Glasgow Warriors from next Monday.

Rennie was due to leave the Warriors at the end of the Pro14 season next month, but there has not yet been a decision on whether the campaign will resume amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Glasgow on Tuesday revealed Wilson will replace Rennie on June 1 in order for both coaches to give their new roles "undivided attention" when rugby union resumes.

Rennie will therefore be free to fully focus on watching Australian Super Rugby franchises in action when they get under way again.

Warriors managing director Nathan Bombrys told the Scottish team's website: "We've agreed that this is the right time for Danny Wilson to formally begin his role as head coach of Glasgow Warriors.

"The original plan was for Danny to come in after Six Nations and shadow Dave and his coaching team for the rest of this campaign. We appreciate Dave's willingness to be open and supportive, as this would have given Danny an excellent head start on next season.

"However, given that the 2019-20 season remains suspended for the foreseeable future, we felt that the best thing for the club would be to let Danny get started.

"With sport in Australia planning to return soon, making the change now will also allow Dave to begin his new role as head coach of the Australian national team.

"We are grateful to Dave for everything he has done for our club over the past three seasons, and particularly for how he has been supportive of the current situation, as well as his willingness to share his vast coaching knowledge with all of our coaches."

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