The Jamaica Football Federation has expresses its condolences to the players, administrators of the Antigua and Barbuda Football Association at the passing of the of Technical Director Ralston ‘Debu’ Williams.

Williams, 55, was the Technical Director of the Antigua and Barbuda Football Association (ABFA) since 2015.

 “We have maintained a great relationship with this particular Federation over the years,” said President Michael Ricketts.

“These are tough times indeed and we pray that everybody who was touched by Mr Williams will stay strong. May his soul Rest in Peace.”

Williams died on Wednesday morning after going into hospital on Friday to undergo tests and await results, said ABFA President Everton Gonsalves, who hailed the late technical director for his contribution to the national football programme.

Debu, as he was called, had been ailing for some time but he never stopped working, Gonsalves said. He immersed himself in work, developing coaching education, women’s football and school football programmes in keeping with the strategic plans of the association that had just moved into its brand new offices.

The president said Williams complained of not feeling well on Friday last and went into hospital where things took a turn for the worse.

Williams was coach of the Antigua and Barbuda national football team in 2004 and was also head coach of the Parham FC. He also worked with Antigua and Barbuda women's national football team as well as the U20 and U17 teams.

In November 2012, he again became of the head coach of the Antigua and Barbuda team.

He is survived by his wife and three children.

 

 

 

Antigua and Barbuda football technical director Rolston Williams has stuck to his guns despite heavy criticism following his insistence that locally-based players were not good enough to match the region’s best teams.

Williams stoked the flames of discontent recently, following claims that the country would have to turn to its internationally based players if it is to compete with the likes of Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and Grenada.

“I don’t care who bash and who make their negative comments, I am dealing with the reality because you’re looking at teams like Jamaica, Trinidad, Grenada who [have] gone to the Gold Cup with 15 overseas players. Suriname brought in the same amount so why are being naïve to say that we can make it on our own when we know it’s difficult?” Williams told the Good Morning Jojo Show.

The Benna Boys recently missed out on qualification to the CONCACAF Gold Cup, following a 2-0 defeat at the hands of Jamaica.  On that occasion, the team had featured a number of locally-based players.

“We had the Barracuda [professional team] that were playing 20 games in a season. The players came home and they were playing 18, so that’s 38 games they played in one year, and that’s the same amount of games the English Premier League is playing; but still, we brought in players,” he said.

“Now, we don’t have any Barracuda so the players are only playing amateur football. So why can we do it on our own now and when we had better players and more seasonal players, we did not think we could do it on our own? We still brought in players, but all of a sudden we can do it on our own with all amateur players,” he added.

 

 

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