Bradley Beal has signed a two-year, $72million contract extension with the Washington Wizards, according to his agent Mark Bartelstein.

All-Star guard Beal has been at the centre of hypothetical trades for months, but the Wizards have seemingly made it clear they have no interest in letting him go – though they are yet to confirm an agreement.

According to ESPN, the extension will begin in the 2021-22 season and includes a third-year player option for 2022-23. The deal guarantees the 26-year-old $130m over four years.

"Brad has always made it clear to me, that in a perfect world, he would never leave Washington,” Bartelstein told ESPN.

"He has felt an obligation to be the focal point in turning the Wizards into an elite team. He's thrilled about all the resources that [team owner] Ted [Leonsis] is pouring into the franchise and thrilled how committed [Leonsis] and [general manager] Tommy [Sheppard] are to building something special."

A recent report from The Washington Post suggested there was growing belief Beal would leave the Wizards, but he has been convinced to remain.

"Washington is where I've been the last seven years, going on eight. It would be great to play in one place forever," Beal told The Washington Post in June.

Beal averaged 25.6 points, 5.0 rebounds and 5.5 assists in 82 games for the Wizards last season. He shot 47.5 per cent from the field and 35.1 per cent from three-point range.

Washington Wizards star John Wall does not want to miss the 2019-20 NBA season after rupturing his Achilles in February.

Wall – a five-time All-Star – is recovering from a torn Achilles tendon suffered earlier this year after he underwent left heel surgery in January.

The 28-year-old is facing a significant period on the sidelines but the Wizards guard wants to return as soon as possible.

"No I'm not willing to," Wall said, when asked if he was willing to sit out all of next season. "But that's what the doctors say, that's what the team says. So I'm fine listening to them [the team] and not trying to do my own thing."

Wall averaged 20.7 points and 8.7 assists per game through 32 appearances in 2018-19. While he was once known as the fastest player in basketball, his pace has slowed significantly in recent years. He is working to get back into top shape, though.

"Me right now, I don't know. I don't know where I'm at," Wall said when responding to how his recovery is going. "I feel great. I've been jogging the last couple days, I've been on the court doing basketball workouts, I'm doing weightlifting every day.

"So, I don't know where I'm at. I don't want to lie to you guys.I always try to be honest with y'all. I don't know exactly where I'm at, but I know I'm making progress and I'm headed where I'm supposed to be. But I'm not rushing myself back."

The Wizards struggled without Wall and missed the playoffs last season, posting a 32-50 record. But in his absence, Bradley Beal blossomed and put together a career year.

Beal averaged career highs in points (25.6), rebounds (5.0) and assists per game (5.5). Washington have offered the 26-year-old guard a three-year, $111million max extension, but he has not accepted yet and garnered trade interest from multiple teams.

Wall thinks Beal will remain with the Wizards though.

"Brad's a very smart guy. He's going to make the best decision for himself and the organisation," Wall said. "He enjoys D.C. I mean, he won the Community Assist Award for all the things he did here. He loves playing with me."

Wall is owed $170m over the next four seasons. 

The Washington Wizards have hired Tommy Sheppard as general manager while former NFL executive Sashi Brown has also been appointed to a prominent role in the organisation.

Ted Leonsis, owner of Monumental Sports & Entertainment, which owns the Wizards among other franchises including the NHL's Washington Capitals, announced a reorganisation of his basketball operations on Monday.

Leonsis revealed the formation of Monumental Basketball, a new collective with oversight of not only the Wizards but also the WNBA's Washington Mystics, the G League's Capital City Go-Go, and the Wizards District Gaming esports operation. 

The revamped organisation will be led by Sheppard, who will serve as GM of the Wizards after holding down the interim role since Ernie Grunfeld was fired on April 2.

While Sheppard's promotion was reported late last week, a couple of other familiar names joining the group were revealed on Monday. 

Former Cleveland Browns executive vice president Brown has been named chief planning and operations officer for Monumental Basketball, while ex-Georgetown coach John Thompson III will lead the organisation's athlete development and engagement department. Monumental also added Daniel Medina from the Philadelphia 76ers as chief of athlete care and performance. 

"We have formed a new leadership team with a forward-thinking structure to adapt to the 'new NBA' that requires every possible strategic advantage to compete and win," Leonsis said in a release.

"We are building a leadership brain trust with deep Wizards/NBA experience and with sports professionals from inside and outside the NBA to challenge our thinking and adapt to an ever-increasing competitive environment."

While Sheppard is a long-time fixture in the Wizards front office, having worked there for the last 16 seasons, Brown is the name that likely will draw the most attention.

The Harvard-educated attorney previously worked as a lawyer in Washington before serving as senior vice president and general counsel for the Jacksonville Jaguars from 2005 until 2012. 

The Browns hired him away in a similar capacity in 2013, and he was put in charge of the team's football operations in January 2016, lasting just under two years on the job before being fired near the end of the 2017 season. Cleveland went 1-27 during his tenure. 

While the Wizards have not been nearly that hapless, mediocrity has been the rule since Leonsis, a former AOL executive, took control in June 2010. The Wizards have missed the playoffs in five of the nine seasons since, but did finish first in the Southeast Division in 2016-17 before falling to the Boston Celtics in the second round of the playoffs. 

Washington went 32-50 last season, losing star guard John Wall to an Achilles injury in late December and seeing marquee free-agent addition Dwight Howard play in only nine games due to back troubles. 

The Chicago Bulls have acquired Tomas Satoransky from the Washington Wizards in a sign-and-trade agreement.

Chicago sent a 2020 second-round pick – which will be the higher of either the Bulls' or the Memphis Grizzlies' selections – to Washington and also agreed to the rights to swap 2022 second-round picks and remove the protection on a 2023 second-round pick owed to the Wizards after a previous trade.

Point guard Satoransky signed a three-year, $30million deal with the Bulls, according to ESPN.

"We wish Tomas and his family the very best as he starts a new chapter in his career and we're pleased to acquire draft picks that will allow us to continue to build for the future," said Wizards senior vice-president of basketball operations Tommy Sheppard.

"He worked very hard with our coaching and development staff over his entire time with the Wizards and it showed with the improvement in his overall game."

Satoransky was selected with the 32nd overall pick in the 2012 NBA Draft and average 6.6 points, 3.7 assists and 2.8 rebounds in 210 games with the Wizards.

The Bulls announced the arrival of Thaddeus Young on Saturday, the free agent reportedly agreeing a three-year, $41m deal.

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