Pep Guardiola lauded Riyad Mahrez's appetite for the big occasion after the Manchester City winger's brace secured a 2-0 win over Paris Saint-Germain and a place in the Champions League final.

Mahrez's free-kick sealed a 2-1 win at Parc des Princes in last week's first leg and he netted a goal in each half on Tuesday to close out a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

The former Leicester City favourite has found the going tough at times since joining City in 2018 but he is now a go-to pick for Guardiola, his four goals and two assists in this season's competition putting the club one game away from elusive Champions League glory.

"Riyad is an extraordinary player – big talent, huge quality, especially in the big games he is always ready," City manager Guardiola told a post-match news conference.

"We know his quality quite well. He is a fantastic player.

"The players in these stages are judged how they behave in the biggest scenarios, the big tests.

"He loves it and enjoys it. He made a good goal, the first one with right foot and the finish for the second. Three goals over the tie, he deserves big compliments.

Fernandinho was a surprise selection on his 36th birthday, but Guardiola felt the club captain excelled.

"Especially in the second half he was incredible," said Guardiola. "We adjusted a little bit [at half-time] to support John [Stones] and Ruben [Dias].

"He was so good, really, really good. It was his birthday, a big present. He has been an extraordinary captain this season, leading us in bad moments and he played really well."

Guardiola conceded it was strange to play such a key game behind closed doors, even if that has now been a reality of the coronavirus pandemic for almost a year.

Before the match, a group of City fans – some with flares – gathered to welcome the team bus to the ground.

"I have to say it was socially distanced but we loved it," Guardiola said. "It's nice to be in a final but we missed them."

"Of course, it was so weird playing the semi-final of the Champions League in empty stadium.

"The club belongs to the people, that's for sure. We are here for a period but the fans always stay. I am pretty sure they are so proud."

Paris Saint-Germain sporting director Leonardo said while now is not the time to decide what is next for Neymar and Kylian Mbappe, he is "optimistic for the future".

Neymar was unable to lead a comeback on Tuesday as Mbappe watched from the sidelines – PSG beaten 2-0 by Manchester City, who progressed to the Champions League final 4-1 on aggregate.

Last season's runners-up PSG failed to land a single shot on target against City – the first time the French side have failed to do so in a Champions League game since 2003-04.

After falling short of the Istanbul showpiece, attention immediately turned to the futures of star duo Neymar and Mbappe, who are both out of contract in 2022 amid ongoing speculation.

Neymar has previously said "everything is almost settled" in regard to a PSG contract renewal though he continues to be linked with a Barcelona return, while Mbappe has been tipped to join Real Madrid.

"Honestly, now is not the time to decide or announce anything," Leonardo told RMC Sport. "We must be proud of what we have done.

"Our goal is to win. We played better in two out of four halves, we scored weird goals. There are a lot of positive things.

"We got out of very difficult situations during the competition. I'm optimistic for the future."

Riyad Mahrez scored twice for hosts City in Manchester, where PSG star Angel Di Maria was sent off for kicking out at Fernandinho with 21 minutes remaining.

PSG – who will now turn their attention to defending their Ligue 1 crown – were hoping to reach back-to-back finals, but Leonardo added: "We cannot forget what we have done over the past two years. We reached the final and lost 1-0 against a team that won everything. This year, we eliminated Barca and Bayern.

"The objective is always to win. Our form has made us a real candidate to win the Champions League. We must continue. It has been a very complicated year. We must be satisfied."

PSG pair Marco Verratti and Ander Herrera both accused referee Bjorn Kuipers of insulting them on Tuesday.

Verratti and Herrera reacted angrily to the decision to send off Di Maria as PSG became just the third team to receive a red card in both legs of a Champions League semi-final after Deportivo La Coruna-Porto (2003-04) and Lyon-Bayern Munich (2009-10).

"The referee told me 'f*** you' twice," Verratti told RMC Sport post-match. "If I do that, I get a 10-man ban. Of course I talk a lot with the referee, but I never say f*** you."

Herrera added: "We talk about respect with the referees. The referee tonight said f*** off to [PSG midfielder] Leandro Paredes. If we say that, we get a three or four-match ban."

On the incident, Leonardo said: "We talked about that. It's so clear that I don't even comment. It's a shame. I think there were a lot of situations that weren't possible - not being well managed."

Kyle Walker hailed Manchester City's defensive heroics after a 2-0 win over Paris Saint-Germain booked a place in their maiden Champions League final.

First-leg hero Riyad Mahrez scored a goal in each half, giving him three in the tie overall, as Pep Guardiola's side closed out a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

Angel Di Maria's petulant red card for kicking out at Fernandinho meant City enjoyed themselves against a bedraggled PSG during the closing stages, but it was not always that straightforward for the Premier League leaders.

Last-ditch blocks were a feature of a relentless defensive performance, with Ruben Dias' efforts to thwart Ander Herrera and Oleksandr Zinchenko's intervention to deny Neymar particularly impressive.

Walker also tangled superbly with the Brazil superstar and told BT Sport that City's defensive improvement this season has been key to them breaching new ground in Europe.

"Against top-quality players like that you need to put in a shift," he said, after City's back four high-fived their way through key moments.

"I thought John, Ruben and Oleks made some important blocks at crucial times and I thought we controlled the game well, considering the amount of talent they've got up front.

"It's a team game. We all go and celebrate a goal. We're high-fiving when we score goals but fur us as defenders the main thing is keeping clean sheets.

"I think this season we've done tremendously well in doing that and really sharpened up on our defensive duty.

"Blocking a shot is just like scoring a goal for me."

Walker gained possession eight times, more than any of his team-mates, with six tackles another best mark for City.

His three interceptions were matched by Fernandinho and Mahrez, while Stones (four) and Dias (three) led the way in clearances and blocks respectively.

Those efforts were a huge part in City avoiding the heartache they suffered against Liverpool, Tottenham and Lyon over the past three seasons.

"I don't think it’s a matter of being over-anxious, I think it’s putting the pressure on ourselves," the England right-back said.

"Obviously we go back to Anfield when we threw it away in the first leg. In the second leg we tried to bring it back but it wasn't good enough.

"The second year we go to Tottenham, people miss penalties and these things happen but again we probably lost it in the first leg. We were chasing it, coming back here and conceded two quick goals.

"Then last year, under different circumstances it was one leg and it was a proper cup game. Anything can happen in those sort of games.

"To go over there and get the well-earned victory, then beat them 2-0 and keep a clean sheet is full credit to this squad."

Pep Guardiola is "incredibly proud" to reach the Champions League final but quickly turned his focus to the other Manchester City players who have served him well over the past five years.

City won 2-0 at home to Paris Saint-Germain on Tuesday with a brace from Riyad Mahrez to clinch a 4-1 aggregate success in the semi-final.

Premier League leaders City will appear in the final for the first time in their history, taking on Chelsea or Real Madrid.

The defeat of PSG ends a long wait including repeated heartbreaks in the knockout stages of the competition, prompting Guardiola to believe the only difference this season was the fortune on City's side.

That meant he reflected again on past pain and how "unfair" it is for some notable City names to miss out.

Modern greats Vincent Kompany and David Silva both played key roles under Guardiola but left prior to this season's European run.

"People believe it's easy to arrive in the Champions League [final]," the City manager told BT Sport. "People believe because it happened in the past, I have to arrive every year in the final of the Champions League.

"Unfortunately, getting the final of the Champions League now makes sense what we have done the last four years or five years, with a lot of people.

"This is a little bit unfair. Every day, these guys are consistent, these guys have shown the last five years in every competition. This is remarkable.

"I said before, this competition is like this: we won the first game because we shoot between the hips of the opponent.

"Today it was the post for Marquinhos and maybe the penalty is given, even when it's of course not a penalty, and you are out for these little details.

"United won a Champions League because Terry's slippy, you know? United won in the last minute at Camp Nou against Bayern Munich, this competition.

"Madrid won against Atletico Madrid in 93 minutes. It's a competition that is so difficult. There's something, the stars are involved in that.

"But we won 11 games in this competition, just a draw with Porto. We made an incredible Champions League and we have three weeks to prepare the final."

City have won their last seven Champions League matches – the longest ever winning run by an English team in European Cup/Champions League history. Indeed, City are also the first English side to win 11 games in a single European Cup/Champions League campaign.

Kompany and some of his other team-mates were not the only City stars unable to make significant contributions on Tuesday, with record goalscorer Sergio Aguero only a substitute, along with Raheem Sterling and Gabriel Jesus.

Aymeric Laporte, Joao Cancelo and Rodri – vital in the past two seasons – were not even called from the bench.

"I'm incredibly proud," Guardiola said. "But my first thought is always for the players who didn't play today.

"I know for them it is so tough, they deserve to play, but everyone makes their contribution in this Champions League season.

"Now it's time to enjoy it. We have one step to the Premier League and then two or three weeks to prepare the final."

PSG finished with 10 men after Angel Di Maria kicked out at Fernandinho, while tempers frayed and further red cards might have followed.

Guardiola – who ended a run of four consecutive Champions League semi-final eliminations, reaching the final for the first time since 2010-11 with Barcelona – said:: "They are huge competitors. They were the team who were runners up last season, in the French league they win every year. It's a team built to stay there.

"The mentality, all of them are huge competitors. They fought until the end – [Marco] Verratti's a big example, [Leandro] Paredes, Neymar, all of them, a huge, huge team.

"But we were so, so composed. We suffered together, defended inside so well, and we did it. We are in the final of the Champions League, these are nice words."

Paris Saint-Germain duo Marco Verratti and Ander Herrera both accused referee Bjorn Kuipers of insulting them as the club crashed out of the Champions League in the semi-finals.

PSG's bid to reach back-to-back Champions League finals came to an end at the hands of Manchester City, who won 2-0 on Tuesday to progress to the tournament decider for the first time in their history 4-1 on aggregate.

Riyad Mahrez scored twice for City as PSG ended the second leg with 10 men after Angel Di Maria was red carded for kicking out at Fernandinho in the 69th minute.

Verratti and Herrera reacted angrily to the decision to send off Di Maria in Manchester, where PSG became just the third team to receive a red card in both legs of a Champions League semi-final after Deportivo La Coruna-Porto (2003-04) and Lyon-Bayern Munich (2009-10).

After last season's runners-up PSG were left licking their wounds, star midfielder Verratti and team-mate Herrera hit out at Kuipers.

"The referee told me 'f*** you' twice," Verratti told RMC Sport post-match.

"If I do that, I get a 10-man ban. Of course I talk a lot with the referee, but I never say f*** you."

Herrera added: "We talk about respect with the referees. The referee tonight said f*** to [PSG midfielder] Leandro Paredes.

"If we say that, we get a three or four-match ban."

PSG failed to land a single shot on target against City – the first time the French side have failed to do so in a Champions League game since 2003-04.

"We were the best team for 70 minutes," said Herrera. "We attacked, we created problems for a team that is playing very well.

"We can leave with our heads held high. We are of course sad. It is not easy to do so, to be a semi-finalist. We must not change what we did today. We played well. We did everything. There are always things to improve."

Riyad Mahrez was delighted with the way Manchester City effectively countered against Paris Saint-Germain, although he suggested this was not their aim in their Champions League semi-final victory.

City reached the final of Europe's elite club competition for the first time with a 2-0 second-leg win that clinched a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

Mahrez had hit the winner in Paris and added both goals at the Etihad Stadium, where the pitch was covered in hail following a pre-match shower.

His first came following a long pass from Ederson – "It's something we work at all the time," Mahrez said – before Phil Foden led a stunning break for the second.

City were sloppy in possession in the opening stages but defended doggedly and soon found space in attack as PSG pressed forward.

"I don't think it was the game plan, but obviously they had to come at us," Mahrez told BT Sport.

"Sometimes, we were a bit deeper, they lose the ball and we are good at the counter as well. That's how the two goals were. We are happy."

As well as his two goals, Mahrez weighed in with a tackle, two clearances and a block. All 10 outfield starters contributed at least one clearance for City.

"When you play the semi-final of the Champions League, you have to be solid, everybody has to defend, everyone has to contribute defensively," Mahrez added.

"That's what we did. We were very solid today, didn't concede much, and that is why we're in the final."

PSG ended with 10 men after Angel Di Maria was dismissed for stamping on Fernandinho, one of many late incidents as the visitors lost their discipline.

The Ligue 1 giants only conceded 12 fouls but earned five cards and might have got off lightly.

Reflecting on the match, Mahrez said: "It was a very good game. We didn't start good again. I don't think we had a very good first half, but we scored the goal and it was more comfortable after the goal.

"Second half I think we played very good; we had a lot of chances, we could score more.

"Then they lost their nerves and started kicking us. It was good. They had a red card and after it was more comfortable for us."

For much of his pre-match news conference, Pep Guardiola stuck to a familiar mantra of recent weeks.

Manchester City were 2-1 to the good against Paris Saint-Germain, with two away goals in the bank and a first Champions League final within touching distance.

All they had to do was "be who we are" and "be more calm". A two-time winner burnt five times at this stage of the competition with Barcelona and Bayern Munich, Guardiola exuded an authoritative air.

However, when the rampaging nature of some of City's European exits were put to him – most notably Mauricio Pochettino's previous visit to the Etihad Stadium with Tottenham – he conceded there was only so much he could do.

"Nobody can control the chaos," Guardiola said. Perhaps he'd checked the weather forecast.

Enjoying loosened COVID-19 restrictions, Manchester's beer gardens thronged with punters last weekend. A couple of hours before kick-off, a weather front blew in from somewhere near Old Testament Egypt.

Snow and hail flecked the first-half playing surface, but there was little cool about City's opening to proceedings.

Within 30 seconds, Phil Foden charged into Alessandro Florenzi. A minute later Fernandinho – Guardiola's customary flirtation with a surprise selection on these occasions – offered a similarly agricultural "Good evening!" to Angel Di Maria that apparently lingered.

Kyle Walker blocked from Neymar, Bernardo Silva blocked from Di Maria and then Walker erred to be outfoxed by Marco Verratti.

Of all the masterful playmakers on display, Verratti was the one who best retained his balletic poise despite the conditions. After half an hour, the Italy playmaker had completed 28 of his 29 passes, 18 of those probing menacingly inside the City half.

The hosts were creaking when referee Bjorn Kuipers awarded an absurd seventh-minute penalty. The ball struck Oleksandr Zinchenko's shoulder. Kuipers checked the monitor sheepishly and overturned his call while Zinchenko unloaded barrels of frustration and emotional energy in the direction of his assistant.

"Nobody can control the chaos."

Well, maybe Ederson can, high-risk/low-pulse goalkeeping replicant that he is. City finally enjoyed a period of smooth possession, moving the ball back to their Brazilian gloveman.

It might not be exactly "who we are" in Guardiola terms, but Ederson's booming 90-yard pass down the left was immaculate. Zinchenko, propelled by a mixture of shrewd positional play and righteous indignation, charged onto the pass.

Kevin De Bruyne was unable to convert, his shot blocked, but Riyad Mahrez was alert to the loose ball, becoming the second player from an English club to score in both legs of a Champions League semi-final after Sadio Mane in 2017-18.

Still, City did not completely settle. One ludicrously dicey roll out from Ederson to Silva saw Di Maria steal in and fire just wide from outside the box.

However, with Kylian Mbappe convalescing on the bench, PSG began to look a touch one-dimensional. The threat of the France star's electric pace in behind was replaced by Mauro Icardi's cloak of invisibility. By the time the former Inter striker was substituted in the 62nd minute, none of his 16 touches remained in the memory.

Mbappe's absence meant everything was happening in front of City and, although their defence had plenty of work to do, Walker, the irrepressible Zinchenko and John Stones all enjoyed stellar nights.

One exceptional Zinchenko challenge to deny Neymar early in the second half saw Stones envelope his diminutive colleague in a bear hug. At that stage in the contest, it was as valuable as any goal.

Then there was Ruben Dias. Perhaps nobody can control the chaos, but the hulking Portugal centre-back could probably block it.

No City player made more than Dias' three blocks. One of those appeared to be with his nose when Ander Herrera blasted goalwards. The former Benfica skipper bounced back up, looking convinced that there is no more fun to be had in the world than stopping a shot in a Champions League semi-final with your face.

Mahrez might beg to differ. Life in Manchester has not always been easy for the ex-Leicester City favourite, but he is now one of Guardiola's go-to men and a supplier of cutting edge within a team of whirring creators.

Two of those – De Bruyne and the now habitually brilliant Phil Foden – combined to create a wonderful second for Mahrez.

Chaos then consumed PSG, their race run. Di Maria kicked out at Fernandinho – Brazil getting one over on Argentina in that eternal battle of perpetual antagonism – and there was plenty more erratic nonsense to follow. Zinchenko was still adorably furious, but elsewhere there was a steely calm and abundant class in sky blue.

Mahrez rounded out his night of nights by doing a Dias, haring back into his own area to make a block. It nearly summarised a tale of mission almost accomplished, of chaos controlled.

Manchester City ended their wait for a first Champions League final appearance as two more Riyad Mahrez goals saw off 10-man Paris Saint-Germain 2-0 on Tuesday.

Mahrez hit the decisive free-kick in a 2-1 semi-final first-leg victory in Paris and strikes in either half in the return fixture added to that advantage.

Those goals and a dogged defensive effort – after a pre-match hail storm that left a sodden, awkward pitch – were enough to finally take Pep Guardiola's men through to Europe's showpiece match with a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

PSG played their part in another gripping affair, but Kylian Mbappe was only fit enough to make the bench and their frustration resulted in a red card for Angel Di Maria when he kicked out at Fernandinho.

The tricky conditions contributed to the chaos in an eventful opening that saw Oleksandr Zinchenko initially penalised for handball in the City area, only for a VAR review to confirm the ball had instead bounced away off his shoulder.

The indignant full-back was fittingly then involved in the opener. He cut a cross back to Kevin De Bruyne, whose deflected shot skidded to Mahrez for a first-time finish through Keylor Navas' legs from a tight angle.

First-leg scorer Marquinhos climbed highest to head against the City crossbar, before Angel Di Maria curled wide of an open goal soon after with Ederson stranded.

The game still did not settle, but there was at least a lull in the goalmouth action until a pair of Navas saves either side of half-time and then a clinical counter that killed the tie.

Foden offloaded the ball to De Bruyne and took his return pass on the left to send in a low centre that found Mahrez all alone to slam in again.

As in the game in Paris, the Ligue 1 side lost their discipline and Di Maria's dismissal for a stamp on Fernandinho might not have been the only red card.

City sought to punish the visitors further and Foden drilled against the foot of the post, before late changes ensured there would be no unwanted suspensions ahead of a trip to Istanbul.

Zinedine Zidane has been left in awe of his Real Madrid team for their persistence this season despite an often-lengthy injury list, though he insists it is no "miracle" to be in the Champions League semi-finals.

Madrid face Chelsea at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday having drawn 1-1 at home to the Blues last week, meaning Thomas Tuchel's men have a slender advantage secured by their away goal.

The omens are not great for Madrid, as they have never beaten Chelsea in four previous meetings and not won on any of their past four trips to England.

On top of that, Tuchel has only suffered four home defeats out of a possible 18 in the Champions League and seen his teams average 2.7 goals per game in those matches.

But Madrid showed character to salvage a draw in the first leg with Karim Benzema levelling Christian Pulisic's opener, and Zidane believes the fact they have got this far despite operating with a depleted squad for much of 2021 is testament to the team's excellent mentality.

"You have to take your hat off to this team," he told reporters on Tuesday. "Every time there are difficulties, they respond. They are the best. We are where we want to be and it is deserved.

"The team has character, first of all, and when things get complicated, they are there."

However, when it was put to Zidane that Madrid's progress this far into the competition was akin to a "miracle", the Frenchman did not want to get carried away.

"It's not a miracle to be here, not at all, on the contrary," he said. "We are here for our work and because we believe in what we do.

"We're here because of our work, nothing else. In football, there are no miracles."

Madrid have recovered several key players for the trip to London, with Marcelo, Sergio Ramos, Federico Valverde and Ferland Mendy all able to travel.

While the loss of Raphael Varane to an abductor injury was a blow, the return of captain Ramos – out since March – will add leadership and experience to the side.

"I'm not going to risk anything," Zidane said of Ramos' inclusion. "If he's with us, he's ready to play.

"He's with us, that means it's okay. It's the most important thing, to have our leader."

Eden Hazard appeared against his former club off the bench last week and Zidane is backing the Belgian to have an impact at Stamford Bridge.

"It's a very good moment for him and I think he comes prepared," Zidane added. "We are going to need him and he'll help, for sure."

Kylian Mbappe will start on the bench as Paris Saint-Germain seek to overturn their Champions League semi-final deficit at Manchester City.

France star Mbappe completed 90 minutes in last week's first leg, which City won 2-1 thanks to second-half goals from Kevin De Bruyne and Riyad Mahrez, but sustained a calf problem.

He sat out Saturday's 2-1 Ligue 1 win over Lens, when Mauro Icardi led Mauricio Pochettino's attack.

The Argentinian striker will do so again at the Etihad Stadium, flanked by Neymar and Angel Di Maria in an all-South American forward line.

Former Manchester United man Ander Herrera comes into the PSG midfield in place of Idrissa Gueye, who is suspended following his red-card challenge on Ilkay Gundogan in the initial encounter, while Pochettino has plumped for Abdou Diallo ahead of Mitchel Bakker at left-back.

Pep Guardiola's side also sees alterations in those two positions, with Oleksandr Zinchenko given the nod over Joao Cancelo at left-back and club captain Fernandinho a surprise selection ahead of usual first choice Rodri at the base of the midfield.

City have never reached a Champions League final, but on the previous 47 instances of an English side winning the first leg of a knockout tie away from home in Europe's top competition, they have progressed on each occasion.

Thomas Tuchel insists Chelsea will not sit back on their away-goal advantage against Real Madrid as it is in the club's DNA to try to win every match.

Christian Pulisic scored a crucial goal for Chelsea in last week's Champions League semi-final first leg before Karim Benzema levelled up the tie at 1-1 through Madrid's only shot on target.

The onus is on Madrid to score an away goal of their own in Wednesday's return match at Stamford Bridge, but Tuchel does not intend to set his side out to protect their narrow lead.

"For me, the challenge is to forget the result in two-legged games and go on and start anew at 0-0," he said at Tuesday's pre-match news conference.

"We will prepare to win the match, nothing else. I don't know any other way to prepare other than to encourage my team to go out and try to win it.

"If we are at our best then it's a no-brainer that we go for the win. We want to win games, this club is about winning.

"This game and competition is about winning. We are in the semi-final second leg.

"The first result is not as important as everybody thinks. There is zero importance for me in the preparation of this match. 

"It's not changed anything about how we've prepared, zero influence. We will encourage them, we will demand from them and we will be strong tomorrow as a group."

Tuchel was left frustrated by Chelsea's finishing in the first leg, with Timo Werner guilty of missing good opportunities either side of Pulisic and Benzema's goals.

Werner has scored from three of his 20 shots in this season's Champions League, giving the Germany international a shot conversion rate of 15.0 per cent.

For comparison, Madrid striker Benzema – who will overtake Raul as the competition's outright fourth top goalscorer if he nets on Wednesday – has scored from six of his 31 shots (19.4 per cent)

But while Tuchel accepts his attacking players have to be more clinical, he is happy to persist with his current set-up.

"I believe that Timo absolutely wants to score more, but we have to understand sometimes strikers miss chances. This is part of the game," he said. 

"We have another training session today and it is always about the last impression from the players.

"Everybody needs to step up to take responsibility for scoring. This will come maybe with more time and some self-confidence. 

"I am pretty relaxed about it and trust my players, no matter who starts tomorrow."

Madrid were without captain Sergio Ramos last week but the experienced defender has been included as part of their squad for Wednesday's game.

Los Blancos have won three and drawn one of the four Champions League games Ramos has started this season, compared to three wins, two draws and two losses in the seven games he has missed.

Tuchel is expecting Ramos to return to the starting line-up at Stamford Bridge, which could also possibly mean a change in formation for the visitors.

"Does Ramos play or not? This is a tough question because I don't know if he's fit or not. We'll see after training and when they give the line-up," the German coach said.

"Does it change for Real Madrid? Yes, it changes them a lot. He's the captain of the most successful team in Europe in recent years.

"It changes a lot but we cannot lose our heads about this decision. I think that he will start, we will prepare for that and we have to make sure he can't do it alone."

"I am not sure if they will play 5-3-2 again, maybe they will go 4-3-3. From this decision, things change. 

"I believe that it is not about formation, what Real Madrid play, it is about how we play. Are we brave enough? Are we courageous enough?"

Chelsea have progressed from five of their past seven knockout ties in the Champions League when avoiding defeat away from home in the first leg. 

However, one of those two eliminations came in their last semi-final appearance in the competition, versus Atletico Madrid in 2013-14 when losing the second leg 3-1.

The Blues' only previous triumph in the competition was in 2011-12 and Tuchel, a beaten finalist with Paris Saint-Germain last season, knows the importance of lifting the trophy.

"I never felt like this competition is our holy grail since I arrived but I felt that this club is about winning," he said. 

"It does something to you, you feel it. We are very competitive, very serious about any game, this is what I like.

"I never felt we had a holy grail to reach the final or winning the Champions League is the only target. I have a strong feeling that every win counts, the club demands it."

Tuchel confirmed midfielder Mateo Kovacic will again miss out for Chelsea through injury, but Antonio Rudiger is fit to play with the aid of a protective mask.

Zinedine Zidane has the deepest squad that has been available to him for some time as Real Madrid travel to face Chelsea with Marcelo, Sergio Ramos, Federico Valverde and Ferland Mendy all available.

Madrid have often had a significantly depleted squad over the past couple of months, with a host of key players ruled out for extended periods.

But with Los Blancos needing a positive at Stamford Bridge in Wednesday's Champions League semi-final second leg, Zidane is once again able to count upon many of them.

While Raphael Varane's absence with an abductor injury sustained against Osasuna at the weekend is a blow, Ramos is available again for the first time since the end of March.

Whether he comes straight back into the starting XI given his lack of match action is another matter, though Eder Militao and Nacho have looked a solid pairing in recent weeks, keeping a clean sheet against Liverpool at Anfield in the quarter-finals.

Zidane will also have options at left-back, with Mendy recovering from a calf strain suffered in mid-April, while Marcelo has been able to travel.

The Brazilian was seemingly set to miss out entirely after he was called up to monitor a local election.

But, according to Spanish outlet La Sexta, an elderly woman – who was apparently a "second substitute" for the election role – volunteered to take Marcelo's place, freeing him up to join the squad before their flight to London.

Valverde, who has missed the past couple of weeks after testing positive for coronavirus, has joined up as well.

Madrid were held to a 1-1 draw at home by Chelsea, meaning they either need to win or secure a score-draw – with the exception of 1-1 – to progress to the final in Istanbul at the end of the month.

An all-English Champions League final could be in the offing as Manchester City and Chelsea look to progress from the last four.

The two Premier League sides each have the edge going into the second leg of their respective semi-final ties with Paris Saint-Germain and Real Madrid.

And history is in their favour as they set their sights on the final in Istanbul on May 29.

Here we preview the two second legs using Opta numbers.

Manchester City v Paris-Saint Germain: Guardiola's men eye European history

It is advantage City after a dramatic first leg at the Parc des Princes, a second-half fightback and 2-1 win meaning PSG will have to score at least twice to progress.

Should Pep Guardiola's men knock out last season's finalists, they will reach their first UEFA European final for 51 years, since winning the 1970 Cup Winners' Cup final against Gornik Zabrze.

This would break the record for the longest gap between appearances in UEFA European finals, held by Sporting CP (41 years between 1964 Cup Winners' Cup final and 2005 UEFA Cup final).

City have won their previous six Champions League matches and another win at the Etihad Stadium would also see them break the record for the longest winning run by an English team in European Cup/Champions League history. Three other sides have won six in a row: Manchester United (1965-66), Leeds United (1969-70) and Arsenal (2005).

They will be the favourites having gone unbeaten in each of their four previous meetings with PSG (W2, D2), with the Ligue 1 club only facing Milan more often in the Champions League (four times) without winning than City (three times).

There have been 47 previous instances in the European Cup/Champions League of an English side winning the first leg of a two-legged knockout tie away from home, and on all 47 occasions the English team has progressed.

Recent history suggests City should be wary of a PSG turnaround, though, Les Parisiens having completed a comeback the last time they lost the first leg of a Champions League tie 2-1, beating Borussia Dortmund in the round of 16 last season.

Yet they have never progressed from a European tie after losing the first leg at home, meaning Guardiola could have plenty to celebrate as he breaks Carlo Ancelotti's record for most Champions League knockout games coached by taking charge of his 63rd.

Chelsea v Real Madrid: Omens point to Blues ending Zidane streak

Chelsea have a slight edge going into the return leg after a 1-1 draw in Spain, Christian Pulisic having scored a superb away goal.

The Blues were frustrated not to add to that opener and were pegged back by Karim Benzema, who could overtake Raul and become the outright fourth top scorer in the Champions League if he nets his 72nd at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday.

But Chelsea are unbeaten in their four previous matches in European competition against Madrid, who are winless in their past four away games against English sides in the Champions League (D2 L2), scoring only two goals across the four games.

And the Blues have progressed from five of their last seven knockout ties in the Champions League when avoiding defeat away from home in the first leg, meaning the omens are against Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane emulating three managerial greats.

Zidane is looking to secure his fourth progression in four Champions League semi-final ties, which would equal the record for most semi-final tie progressions by a coach in competition history (four - along with Alex Ferguson, Carlo Ancelotti and Marcello Lippi).

In his way is a coach who has proven formidable in home games in this tournament.

Chelsea boss Thomas Tuchel, who guided PSG to last year's final, has only lost four of his 18 home games as a manager in the Champions League (W12 D2), with his sides scoring 48 goals across these fixtures - an average of 2.7 per game.

If Madrid are to defeat the odds that are seemingly stacked against them, then midfielder Toni Kroos is likely to play a key role.

Kroos has been involved in 59 shot-ending sequences in the Champions League this season; the most of any midfielder in the competition, and second only to PSG's Kylian Mbappe (60) among players for teams remaining in the competition.

Marco Verratti believes Paris Saint-Germain must "suffer" to defeat Manchester City but does not think they need a miracle in the Champions League semi-final.

Mauricio Pochettino's side must overcome a 2-1 deficit in Tuesday's second leg at the Etihad Stadium, having let a first-half lead slip in last week's initial encounter.

City's capacity to establish suffocating midfield control after half-time in the Parc des Princes, laying the foundation for goals from Kevin De Bruyne and Riyad Mahrez to turn the tie in their favour, was very much in keeping with the style espoused by their manager Pep Guardiola.

Verratti expects more of the same in Manchester, but feels PSG must not be cowed as they seek to reach back-to-back finals.

"Guardiola has always done this. He likes to have control of the ball, accelerate when he wants, calm things down when he wants. You have to focus on us," the Italy midfielder told a pre-match news conference.

"We have a great team, a great coach. We must remain lucid, calm, we will have our opportunity.

"We did not lose 4-0 in the first leg, there is no need for a miracle. They have a small advantage, but we are there, we are close.

"It will go through small details. If City want to play with the ball, it will be up to us to play with our style of play tomorrow."

How successfully PSG can implement that style might well rest on the fitness of Kylian Mbappe, who will be assessed having suffered a calf injury in the initial game.

In terms of City's approach, Verratti is relishing taking on a collective of midfield playmakers for whom he has plenty of admiration.

"[De Bruyne], he's a very strong player, he's fantastic," he said.

"It's a very strong collective since the arrival of Guardiola. We had a good game in the first leg, the second half was less good, but because there is a great team in front.

"Gundogan and Rodri are very good players who control the team. You have to take control of the middle to have a great game."

As such, Verratti feels toil in pursuit of an against-the-odds victory is inevitable.

"We are not a team of aliens. We will suffer," he added.

"We play in the Champions League, one of the best teams in the world. The times when we have to suffer, we have to suffer together.

"It's sport, football, there are times to have chances and to score and others to suffer. Of course, it won't be easy to go to the final. We knew it.

"We suffered against Bayern Munich, against Barcelona, but we are ready to do anything during tomorrow's match."

Neymar has issued a rallying call to Paris Saint-Germain ahead of their Champions League semi-final showdown with Manchester City, claiming he is ready to "die on the pitch".

PSG slipped to a 2-1 defeat in last week's first leg at Parc des Princes, Kevin De Bruyne and Riyad Mahrez overturning Marquinhos' first-half opener.

An impressive opening to the contest from Mauricio Pochettino's men subsided, with City exerting almost complete control on proceedings after the interval.

Neymar cut an increasingly isolated figure, while attacking partner Kylian Mbappe failed to attempt a single shot after starting a match for the first time in his Champions League career.

The world's most expensive player is aware of the tall task that awaits at the Etihad Stadium, although he has not given up hope of last season's beaten finalists returning to the showpiece.

"We have a very difficult match against Manchester City, but we have to believe, no matter what the stats or our percentage chance of winning is," Neymar told PSG's in-house channel.

"I think that every Parisian has to believe in us. I'll be the first to do so.

"I'm on the front line and I'll be the first warrior to go into battle for the team.

"I'm going to give the best of myself and I'll do everything I can to qualify, whatever happens."

With a chuckle, he added: "Even if I have to die on the pitch."

The stats Neymar alludes to certainly do not make for comfortable reading for those of a PSG persuasion.

There have been 47 previous instances of English clubs winning the first leg of Champions League or European Cup tie away from home. On each occasion, they have progressed.

City have won each of their past six Champions League matches and have 10 out of 11 victories this season, with a goalless draw at Porto the only blemish. A seventh win would edge Pep Guardiola's men ahead of Manchester United (1965-66), Leeds United (1969-70) and Arsenal (2005) as the outright English record holders for the longest winning run in Europe's premier club tournament.

PSG have played City four times in European competitions and are yet to beat the Manchester side.

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