Dylan Groenewegen says competing again is far from his thoughts after he was suspended from racing by his own team following the Tour of Poland crash that left Fabio Jakobsen in an induced coma.

The Jumbo-Visma team said Groenewegen is "devastated" by this week's events and has acknowledged it was his mistake that caused fellow Dutchman Jakobsen to be hospitalised.

He appeared to nudge Jakobsen into the barriers in a high-speed sprint finish on Wednesday's opening stage of the race, and world governing body the UCI is looking at whether to discipline Groenewegen, which could mean a ban.

Jumbo-Visma said Groenewegen "broke a sports rule and that’s unacceptable", adding: "We have decided that Dylan will not start in a race until the judgment of the disciplinary committee to which the UCI has handed over the incident."

Speaking to Dutch TV channel NOS, Groenewegen said: "It is clearly my fault. I veered off course and it is not allowed. Thinking of sprinting is far from my concerns. I won't even think about cycling in the coming months."

Deceuninck-QuickStep rider Jakobsen, 23, has emerged from his coma after facial surgery and his condition has been described as "good" by race organisers.

Groenewegen said of the incident: "Everything went so fast ... from one second to the next, I found myself on the ground and could only see the enormous damage caused by this fall.

"I saw Fabio's team-mates standing around him and I understood that this was serious. From that moment on, I can just hope that he will eventually recover. And apologise for this mistake.

"Of course, I hardly sleep any more. I think of Fabio and his family all the time."

The 27-year-old has promised to get in touch with those close to Jakobsen, saying: "I think it's not a good time yet. But of course, I will when the timing is a little better."

Tour of Poland organisers have revealed Fabio Jakobsen is out of a coma and in a "good" condition two days after his high-speed crash at the end of stage one.

Deceuninck-QuickStep rider Jakobsen was in a serious but stable condition after being airlifted to a hospital in Katowice following the incident on Wednesday.

The Dutchman underwent facial surgery and Deceuninck-QuickStep said doctors would try and wake the 23-year-old up on Thursday.

There was a positive update on his condition on Friday.

A tweet from the Tour of Poland account said: "We have good news from the hospital in Sosnowiec! @FabioJakobsen is awake now from the coma. Condition is 'good'."

Dylan Groenewegen apologised on Thursday after he was disqualified for causing the crash.

Jumbo-Wisma rider Groenewegen was strongly condemned by the International Cycling Union (UCI) for his "dangerous behaviour".

He posted on Twitter: "I hate what happened yesterday [Wednesday]. I can't find the words to describe how sorry I am for Fabio and others who have fallen or been hit.

"At the moment, the health of Fabio is the most important thing. I think about him constantly."

Dylan Groenewegen has expressed his dismay after the horrific Tour of Poland crash that left Fabio Jakobsen in an induced coma.

Deceuninck-QuickStep rider Jakobsen was in a serious but stable condition in a Katowice hospital after undergoing facial surgery, with doctors intending to wake the 23-year-old on Thursday.

Jakobsen was airlifted to hospital on Wednesday after fellow Dutchman Groenewegen appeared to nudge him into the barriers in a high-speed sprint finish on the opening stage of the race.

Jumbo-Wisma rider Groenewegen was disqualified and strongly condemned by governing body the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) for his "dangerous behaviour".

Groenewegen made a first public statement on Thursday, saying he felt for Jakobsen.

He posted on Twitter: "I hate what happened yesterday. I can't find the words to describe how sorry I am for Fabio and others who have fallen or been hit.

"At the moment, the health of Fabio is the most important thing. I think about him constantly."

Jumbo-Wisma issued an apology on Wednesday and said an internal review would take place.

"Our thoughts go out to Fabio Jakobsen and other people involved in today's terrible crash in the Tour of Poland. Crashes like these should not happen," the team tweeted.

"We offer our sincere apologies and we will discuss internally what has happened before we may make any further statement."

Deceuninck-QuickStep rider Fabio Jakobsen remains in a serious but stable condition after undergoing facial surgery following a horrific crash during the Tour of Poland.

Jakobsen was placed in an induced coma after being airlifted to Wojewodzki Szpital in Katowice on Wednesday following the smash at the end of stage one. 

Dylan Groenewegen was disqualified and strongly condemned by governing body the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) for "dangerous behaviour", having appeared to nudge his Dutch compatriot into the barriers in a sprint finish.

Tests revealed Jakobsen did not suffer brain or spinal injuries, but he remains in a coma following an operation and doctors will attempt to wake the 23-year-old up later on Thursday.

Deceuninck-QuickStep said in a statement: "Fabio had facial surgery during the night. His situation is stable at the moment and later today the doctors will try to wake Fabio up."

Jumbo-Wisma, Groenewegen's team, issued an apology and said an internal review will take place.

"Our thoughts go out to Fabio Jakobsen and other people involved in today's terrible crash in the Tour of Poland. Crashes like these should not happen," the team tweeted.

"We offer our sincere apologies and we will discuss internally what has happened before we may make any further statement. #TDP20."

Deceuninck – Quick Step have confirmed Fabio Jakobsen is in a serious but stable condition following an incident in the Tour of Poland.

Jakobsen was sent over the barriers during a sprint finish with Dylan Groenewegen, who was subsequently disqualified by the UCI for appearing to nudge his competitor.

Several other riders were injured after crashing as the barriers split and flew across the road, with Jakobsen airlifted to hospital where he was placed into an induced coma.

Deceuninck – Quick Step have now provided an update on their rider's condition.

"Fabio Jakobsen's situation is serious but at the moment he is stable," a statement from the team read.

"Diagnostic tests did not reveal brain or spinal injury, but because of the gravity of his multiple injuries, he is still kept in a comatose condition and has to remain closely monitored in the following days at the Wojewodzki Szpital in Katowice.

"Further information will be made available in the course of the coming hours. Meanwhile, we would like to thank you for your heartwarming support."

Prior to Deceuninck – Quick Step's update, UCI strongly condemned the actions of Team Jumbo-Wisma rider Groenewegen.

Jumbo-Wisma posted on Twitter to apologise for the incident and said an internal review will be taking place.

"Our thoughts go out to Fabio Jakobsen and other people involved in today's terrible crash in the Tour of Poland. Crashes like these should not happen," it read.

"We offer our sincere apologies and we will discuss internally what has happened before we may make any further statement. #TDP20."

The UCI said it "strongly condemns the dangerous behaviour" of Dylan Groenewegen for causing the crash at the end of the first stage of the Tour of Poland that left Fabio Jakobsen in an induced coma.

Groenewegen won the stage but was later disqualified from the race after Jakobsen was sent careering over the barriers during a sprint finish.

Several other riders were injured after crashing as the barriers split and flew across the road.

Deceuninck-Quick-Step rider Jakobsen was airlifted to hospital, as was a course-side referee, where he was later placed into an induced coma.

A statement from UCI read: "[The UCI] strongly condemns the dangerous behaviour of rider Dylan Groenewegen (Jumbo-Wisma), who sent Fabio Jakobsen (Deceuninck-Quick-Step) into the barriers a few metres from the finish, causing a collective crash at the end of the first stage of the Tour of Poland.

"Groenewegen was disqualified from the race by the commissaires' panel.

"The UCI, which considers the behaviour unacceptable, immediately referred the matter to the Disciplinary Commission to request the imposition of sanctions commensurate with the seriousness of the facts.

"Our Federation is wholeheartedly with the affected riders."

Jumbo-Wisma posted on Twitter to apologise for the incident and said an internal review will be taking place.

"Our thoughts go out to Fabio Jakobsen and other people involved in today's terrible crash in the Tour of Poland. Crashes like these should not happen," it read.

"We offer our sincere apologies and we will discuss internally what has happened before we may make any further statement. #TDP20."

Deceuninck-Quickstep posted: "Our thoughts and prayers are with Fabio Jakobsen. When we have news, we will let you know. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts for your support."

The Giro d'Italia and Vuelta a Espana will overlap in October this year after the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) revealed its revised 2020 schedule on Tuesday.

Racing was halted in March due to the coronavirus pandemic, with the suspension last month extended until August 1 for the UCI's WorldTour events, including the three Grand Tours.

But following a period of consultation with representatives of riders, organisers and teams, the UCI has laid out fresh plans for the conclusion of the season, which will see 25 events crammed into a little over three months.

The plans are subject to current social and travel restrictions being lifted, but the season is due to resume on August 1 with Strade Bianche in Tuscany, Italy, before finishing on November 8 with the conclusion of La Vuelta, which is now set to begin on October 20.

Spain's Grand Tour - initially set to start in mid-August - had been shortened by a weekend at the request of organisers, after the city of Utrecht in Netherlands declared it would not be able to meet conditions for the Grand Depart.

However, even with La Vuelta operating with a reduced schedule, it will overlap – as had been expected – with the Giro d'Italia, which is to run from October 3-25.

The Tour de France had already been confirmed to start on August 29 and finish on September 20.

UCI president David Lappartient said: "We have drawn up a solid, attractive and varied new calendar that is as realistic and coherent as possible. This has been achieved as early as was practicable and in line with information available today [Tuesday] concerning the evolution of the pandemic.

"Riders, teams and organisers now have the dates they need to anticipate the resumption of racing on August 1. This is a very important step that the entire cycling community, financially impacted by the pandemic, has been waiting for to move forward."

He added: "We will continue to move forward together towards the resumption of the season, nevertheless with the reminder that the health of riders and all concerned parties is still the overriding priority, and that the recommencement of our activities will remain dependent on the evolution of the world health situation."

The Women's WorldTour is also set to recommence on August 1, with its new schedule including 18 events.

French cyclist Nans Peters has sounded a warning that drug cheats could try to take advantage of the coronavirus pandemic by juicing up in lockdown.

Peters made a major breakthrough with a maiden grand tour stage win on last year's Giro d'Italia, as well as finishing third in a Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games test event.

The 26-year-old rides for the AG2R La Mondiale team and says his last test stemming from the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) ADAMS whereabouts system took place on October 7 last year.

He reported having a cortisolemia check carried out by the Movement for Credible Cycling (MPCC) union in March at the Paris-Nice race, but pointed out only certain teams belong and submit to testing by that body.

Like most sports, professional cycling has shut down during the COVID-19 crisis, with the Tour de France shunted back by two months to an August 29 start.

"What does it mean? Two options," wrote Peters on his personal website, considering the few doping checks he has been required to take.

"Either I have a profile that is not at all suspicious, which means I'm rarely tested, this is in effect the case since starting as a professional, where I was only checked three to four times a year.

"Or, and I'm very afraid of this, in this period of confinement there is no control!!!!!

"Let's not be naive, there is still doping, fortunately much less than in the years 1995 - 2005, but there will always be!

"Are cheaters free at the moment? It is as if we were told, 'Do you want to cheat? Well go for it! It's time, do what you want, take what you want, train like crazy at home now, you have until May 11 to get your engine going and crush everything when you return to competition'."

The Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation, which carries out testing in professional cycling, said in March it intended to be "continuing activities to protect clean cycling".

It said it would be following advice of WADA, which has said testing during the coronavirus period "will continue only where appropriate and possible".

Peters added: "I'm afraid for my sport, for my passion and for my end of the season facing mules!"

All road cycling events until at least the end of April have been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Union Cycliste International (UCI) announced on Wednesday.

Just three days after announcing a suspension on all events until April 3, the UCI extended the hiatus in the calendar following a meeting with race organisers, teams and riders.

The resumption date will be reviewed during the intervening period, with events on the calendar at that point, the three Grand Tours and the sport's Monuments to be given priority in any rescheduling procedure.

The Giro d'Italia, which was due to start on May 9, has already been postponed, while the Tour of Flanders, Paris-Roubaix and Liege-Bastogne-Liege - three of the five Monuments - will no longer take place as planned.

A UCI statement read: "With this decision, cycling wishes to be able to guarantee the visibility of our sport, which will find itself in competition with other major international sports events, while ensuring the best possible exposure for the most-viewed races.

"Moreover, the UCI would like to make clear that the men and women's road season may be extended until November 1, 2020.

"The principle of flexibility could also be envisaged when it comes to the number of cyclists entered by teams at events.

"These decisions will be submitted to the UCI management committee and the Professional Cycling Council (PCC) for approval.

"Finally, the UCI proposed that cycling's stakeholders hold regular meetings to better anticipate the resumption when the time comes.

"For disciplines other than road, the UCI will make a detailed announcement at a later date."

Mitchelton-Scott, Movistar, Astana and Jumbo-Visma were among a host of teams to pull out of races at the start of March due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Mads Pedersen clinched the UCI World Championship title in stunning fashion with a scintillating sprint finish at the culmination of a gruelling men's elite road race.

With favourites such as Peter Sagan, Julian Alaphilippe and Alejandro Valverde having fallen off the pace throughout a shortened 262km route due to adverse weather, it was youngster Pedersen who triumphed against the odds in Harrogate.

Matteo Trentin looked in prime position with 200m to go, but made his move too early, with Pedersen jumping straight onto his rivals' wheel before bursting off to secure a first-ever road race gold for a Danish rider.  

Trentin followed in second with Stefan Kung completing the podium - three-time champion Sagan, who had made a late push off the front of the peloton, coming over in fifth after Gianni Moscon, who dropped off the leading pack with six kilometres remaining.

"Unbelievable! We didn't expect this when we started this morning. At first [the aim] was to survive, survive, survive," the 23-year-old Pedersen told BBC Sport.

"When I saw the finish line I hoped the pain would be gone and I could do a good sprint. After six-and-a-half hours on the bike there is not much left.

"You have to be focused and stay in front. Don't get any bad luck. It's every rider's dream to wear that jersey. For me to do it now is unbelievable."

Defending champion Valverde abandoned the race with more than 50km remaining, telling Spanish media: "It's a world championship for mad men."

Another favourite cracked with 12km to go, Mathieu van der Poel finally deciding he could no longer keep pace with the lead group, which was soon trimmed to four when Moscon gave up his chance for a medal. 

Tao Geoghegan Hart came in as the leading British rider, finishing 26th, while Geraint Thomas finished far out of contention in Yorkshire.

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