Josh Philippe is one of three uncapped players included in Australia's squad after their ODI and Twenty20 tour of England was confirmed to go ahead.

Philippe, Daniel Sams and Riley Meredith were included in a 21-man touring party.

Australia named a preliminary squad last month amid uncertainty over the tour due to the coronavirus pandemic, but it was confirmed on Friday the matches would go ahead in September.

Philippe scored 487 runs at an average of 37.46 for the Sydney Sixers during the 2019-20 Big Bash League, while the Sydney Thunder's Sams (30) was the leading wicket-taker.

Meredith, meanwhile, took 10 wickets at 13.70 in six games for the Hobart Hurricanes.

Australia will fly to the United Kingdom later this month before a three-game T20 series starts on September 4, while the ODIs are scheduled to begin a week later.

Glenn Maxwell returns to the squad, replacing D'Arcy Short, while Marcus Stoinis was also recalled.

"It's a squad with great depth and a sprinkle of some exceptional young players," Australia national selector Trevor Hohns said. 

"We are very pleased with the final group which was chosen with a view to continuing our recent form in T20 cricket and the longer term goal of returning to the top in the 50-over game.

"The top and middle order is extremely strong, there's plenty of accomplished all-rounders, fantastic fast bowling depth and spin options. The squad also has the cover required to meet all contingencies given replacements are not available for this tour if injury or illness were to occur.

"The NSP [National Selection Panel] believes this squad, along with those who missed out and others who perform well in domestic cricket, offers a solid platform for success in the white-ball game going forward."

Australia senior assistant coach Andrew McDonald will not travel with the squad due to a commitment to coach the Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League.

Australia: Aaron Finch, Sean Abbott, Ashton Agar, Alex Carey, Pat Cummins, Josh Hazlewood, Marnus Labuschagne, Nathan Lyon, Mitchell Marsh, Glenn Maxwell, Riley Meredith, Josh Philippe, Daniel Sams, Kane Richardson, Steve Smith, Mitchell Starc, Marcus Stoinis, Andrew Tye, Matthew Wade, David Warner, Adam Zampa.

The Men's T20 World Cup scheduled to take place in Australia this year will now be held in 2022, with next year's tournament remaining in India.

Australia was due to stage the showpiece in October and November, but the coronavirus pandemic put paid to that.

West Indies will instead look to defend their title in India in October 2021, with Australia hosting the tournament the following year.

The format for the 2021 edition will be unchanged, so the teams that qualified for this year's tournament will play in India and a new qualification process will take place for the event in Australia.

Due to the impact of the COVID-19 crisis, the Women's T20 World Cup in New Zealand has been put back from next year and will get under way in February 2022.

Five teams have already qualified for the event and they will still take their place in the tournament in 2022, and the three remaining places will be up for grabs in a qualification event next year.

ICC acting chairman Imran Khwaja said: "Over the last few months as we have considered how we return to staging global events, our number one priority has been to protect the health and safety of everyone involved in ICC events.

"The decisions the board have taken today are in the best interests of the sport, our partners and importantly our fans.

"I'd like to thank our partners at the BCCI, Cricket Australia and Cricket New Zealand as well as the Australian and New Zealand governments for their continued support and commitment to a safe return to ICC events."

ICC chief executive Manu Sawhney said: "We now have absolute clarity on the future of ICC events enabling all of our members to focus on the rescheduling of lost international and domestic cricket. We will now proceed as planned with the Men's T20 World Cup 2021 in India and host the 2022 edition in Australia.

"We have taken the decision to move the ICC Women's Cricket World Cup to give players from every competing nation, the best opportunity to be ready for the world's biggest stage and there is still a global qualifier to complete to decide the final three teams.

"There has been no women's international cricket played since the conclusion of the ICC Women's T20 World Cup earlier this year and due to the varying impact of COVID-19 globally that is likely to remain the situation for a number of the teams.

"Moving the event by 12 months gives all competing teams the chance to play a sufficient level of cricket ahead of both the qualification event and leading into a Cricket World Cup so the integrity of the tournament is maintained.”

England's white-ball tour of India has been postponed until early next year.

Eoin Morgan's side were scheduled to arrive in India at the end of next month for three ODIs and as many Twenty20 Internationals.

Those two series will now take place in 2021 after the T20 World Cup in Australia was postponed and the Indian Premier League was rescheduled to start in September.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) are in consultation over revised dates for the tour.

ECB chief executive officer Tom Harrison said: "Now that we have clarity regarding the postponement of the ICC Men's T20 World Cup, it enables us to work with other boards to progress the vital task of optimising the international schedules in the challenging circumstances that we have all been having to address with the COVID-19 pandemic.

"International cricket between India and England is a highlight of the cricketing calendar and we look forward to working with the BCCI to firm-up the schedules for these eagerly anticipated tours as soon as possible."

Jay Shah, honorary secretary of the BCCI, said: "The BCCI and ECB are working closely to finalise the schedule as we move towards the resumption of cricket.

"The India-England series is one of the most anticipated contests in world cricket. The two teams compete hard on the field and provide some riveting moments.

"I am pleased with the way BCCI and ECB have managed the situation. The rescheduled tour is also being redesigned in a way to accommodate both red and white-ball formats and will now be a comprehensive one."

Rohit Sharma has distanced himself from comparisons to former India captain MS Dhoni which were made by Suresh Raina.

Speaking on the Super Over podcast, Raina likened Rohit's leadership to that of Dhoni, who captained India in over 300 matches across all formats and led the team to all three ICC white-ball trophies during his tenure between 2007 and 2016.

Though Virat Kohli succeeded Dhoni as India's skipper, Raina talked up Rohit's demeanour and described him as "the next MS Dhoni for the Indian cricket team".

When that was put to Rohit in an online question-and-answer session, the opener said on a Twitter video: "Yes, I heard about that comment from Suresh Raina.

"MS Dhoni is one of a kind and nobody can be like him and I believe comparisons should not be made like that, every individual is different and has his strengths and weaknesses."

Rohit, 33, has led Mumbai Indians to a record four Indian Premier League titles and has also captained India in 10 ODIs and 19 Twenty20 internationals, winning 23 of those 29 matches.

"Around him, players enjoy the intensity, they enjoy his aura," former India batsman Raina had said.

"When you enjoy the aura of a player, you like to be positive and I think that is what he is good at.

"MS Dhoni was brilliant. He [Rohit] has won more [IPL] trophies than MS, but they both are very similar. Both of them, as captains, like to listen.

"When your captain is listening, you can solve a lot of problems, you can solve the mental aspects of the players. So in my book, they both are wonderful.

"I have seen [Rohit], he is calm, he likes to listen. He likes to give confidence to the players and on top of that, he likes to lead from the front.

"When a captain leads from the front and, at the same time, he gives respect to the dressing-room atmosphere, you know you have it all."

Australia's Twenty20 series against West Indies scheduled for October has been postponed.

The move comes after the T20 World Cup, which was due to be played in Australia this year, was postponed last month due to the coronavirus pandemic.

In a statement, Cricket Australia (CA) said it and the Windies had agreed to postpone their scheduled three-game T20 series, which was set to be played in Queensland.

"Given the preference to host the warm-up three-match T20 series against the West Indies to coincide with the rescheduled T20 World Cup in Australia [which will take place in either 2021 or 2022], it has been agreed to postpone the matches," part of a statement from CA read on Tuesday.

Townsville, Cairns and the Gold Coast were scheduled to host the T20 matches.

Gary Stead has dismissed talk of a rift between himself and Kane Williamson and the New Zealand head coach revealed he has held positive talks over a new contract.

It has been reported that the relationship between Stead and Black Caps captain Williamson has deteriorated, with speculation that the head coach wanted Tom Latham to take over as Test skipper.

Stead denied that was the case back in May and although he says there is "positive conflict" between the two, the 48-year-old insisted they have no problem working together.

He told Stuff: "Kane and I have a really strong relationship, and we spoke about it.

"There was no basis in truth and the disappointing part is it's coming from somewhere and someone, but it's not Kane and it's not I.

"I really enjoy working with Kane. The discussions we have are robust and always directed at what's best for the team, which is something I know we are truly aligned on.

"It's like any business, you always have positive conflict and if there wasn't, then I'd be worried."

Stead is nearing the end of the two-year deal he signed to replace Mike Hesson, but hopes to extend his tenure.

"Talks have been pretty positive and, if New Zealand Cricket and the players feel as though I can keep contributing then I'd be interested in continuing on," he added.

New Zealand have not played since March due to the coronavirus pandemic and are not due to be in action until hosting West Indies in a Test series in November, subject to government approval.

Quinton de Kock has revealed AB de Villiers was "definitely in line" to play for South Africa in the T20 World Cup this year.

Proteas legend De Villiers retired from international cricket in 2018 but has made no secret of his desire to make a comeback.

The T20 World Cup was due to start in Australia in October but on Monday was officially postponed for a year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

South Africa white-ball skipper De Kock says 36-year-old batsman De Villiers was on course to feature in the tournament if it had gone ahead as scheduled.

The wicketkeeper-batsman told the Cricket Connected show on Star Sports: "He was definitely in line. If fit, I would have loved to have AB de Villiers.

"I think any team would have loved to have AB de Villiers in their team. While we were pushing for him, now we will have to see when the T20 World Cup is going to happen now."

De Villiers last played for his country in the shortest format in October 2017.

Only JP Duminy has scored more T20 runs for the Proteas than De Villiers' tally of 1,672 from 75 innings, including 10 half-centuries.

England's cricket stars have been urged to be careful about heading back to pubs and restaurants - with Ashley Giles warning they could be putting the planned schedule at risk. 

Prime minister Boris Johnson has said England will see a reopening of many drinking, eating and even entertainment establishments from July 4, and there may be a clamour to rekindle social lives. 

But with the coronavirus threat still present, there is no certainty such venues will be safe environments, even with social distancing measures in place. 

England are hosting West Indies and Pakistan in Test action in the coming months, they also play the latter in T20 cricket as well, plus have ODIs against Ireland and potentially limited-overs games against Australia to come. 

Former spin bowler Giles, now director of men's cricket at the England and Wales Cricket Board, said it was important to be aware of the possible perils of mixing socially. 

"We haven't talked about banning them, but what we'd ask them to be is sensible," Giles said. "They have been throughout the whole process. 

"They need to continue that, because if you come back into an environment and you haven't been adhering to the guidelines then you put everyone else and the series at risk." 

England will be living in bio-secure environments for large parts of their summer, but squads for each series could differ, and there may be factors that mean players have to temporarily leave camp. 

The opening matches see England face West Indies in three Tests, with the first played in Southampton before back-to-back fixtures at Old Trafford.  

"It'll be quite strange," Giles said. "We could be in a situation where we have a very secure bubble for the second and third Test matches of the series and the rest of the world is operating at a new normal, with restaurants and pubs open again. 

"Our main responsibility is to get this series on the road and keep everyone safe, especially including the West Indies team who've done so much to come here." 

With 10 Pakistan players having tested positive for coronavirus, it remains to be seen whether they and England can go ahead with their planned series, although both sides are intending to do so at present. 

A backstop option could see England invite Ireland to step into the breach. 

Giles says that is not currently being discussed, adding: "As with this situation throughout, we've had to be agile and adapt very quickly to different situations, all of us." 

When England are locked together in camp, Giles says it will be the responsibility of everyone to guard against missteps, and he is braced for mistakes to be made. 

"I think it would be down to all of us to police it. The players are aware of the seriousness of the situation," he told a news conference. 

"People are going to make mistakes. We all are. We're all going to get it wrong. 

"It will be weird. Anyone who thinks this is going to be a holiday camp is going to be seriously mistaken. 

"There could be an opportunity for some guys to play golf on a course next door. But apart from that there's two sessions of cricket a day; there's going to be a lot of work. 

"But inside, social distancing still, wearing of masks, probably spending a lot of time on your own isn't a lot of fun and I think it's a bit of a culture shock." 

Giles said he was "quietly confident" about Australia visiting later this year, albeit there was "some nervousness" on the part of their Ashes rivals. 

India seamer Mohammed Shami said his family made him realise he had to "fight back" when he was contemplating suicide.

Shami recently revealed during an Instagram live chat with team-mate Rohit Sharma that he thought about ending his life three times a few years ago.

The 29-year-old was tormented by personal problems and was also suffering from a knee injury, but has been able to come through some dark days.

Shami had company 24 hours a day during such difficult times and is grateful for the support his family provided.

"Depression is a problem that needs attention. It was unfortunate to see such a brilliant actor like Sushant Singh Rajput lose his life," Shami told the Hindustan Times.

"He was a friend and I wish I could talk to him had I known about his mental condition. In my case, my family pulled me out of that low phase.

"They took care of me and made me realise that I needed to fight back. There were times I felt suicidal but my family ensured I was never alone.

"Someone or the other would always be around, talking to me. Spirituality also helps you seek answers. Talking to your close ones or counselling is the best way out."

Shami says his international team-mates also played a part in helping him through a tough period in his life.

"Mental pressure definitely interferes in your physical wellbeing. At the same time, if you seek help from others and talk about it, you can get rid of such issues off the field," he added. 

"I was lucky to have the team's support staff along with Virat Kohli and other players backing me. We are like a family.

"My team-mates always insisted I vent my anger and frustration out on the field. I am happy that phase is over."

Justin Langer has compared telling Australia batting coach Graeme Hick he was being made redundant to facing Curtly Ambrose and Courtney Walsh without a box or helmet.

Hick was among 40 members of staff to be laid off by Cricket Australia on Wednesday in cost-cutting measures as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Former England batsman Hick had been on the coaching staff since 2016.

Australia head coach likened giving Hick the bad news to not being fully protected with former West Indies paceman Ambrose and Walsh charging in.

"Having to tell Graeme Hick yesterday morning was like facing Ambrose and Walsh without a helmet and a box on," Langer said.

"He's become a really good mate, his work ethic is second to none, his experience as a cricket person and his integrity, you couldn't meet a nicer person.

"We're going to have to lead a smaller staff but we'll get the job done and we'll be ready when cricket resumes.

"[The players] have been supported brilliantly for a long time and there's no reason they won't be able to be supported equally as well."

Langer says Australia are preparing to return to the field in September, but he stated it is too early to commit to a tour of England.

"I'm not sure when the soonest is. There's obviously complexities to all these things," the former opening batsman added.

"Same with England. I'd imagine it's really important for English cricket that the Australian cricket team goes there if we can. But it's not as simple as that.

"With isolation periods and preparation then when we come back [and] when the ICC make the decision in July about the World Cup.

"Then if the IPL is going on, there's so many moving parts at the moment. What I know is we'll focus on being ready for early September."

Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) chairman Ehsan Mani does not believe it is realistic to expect the Twenty20 World Cup to be staged this year.

The competition in Australia is due to start on October 18, but it appears it may be postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Cricket Australia chairman Earl Eddings said it would be "unrealistic" and "very, very difficult" for the World Cup to go ahead as scheduled.

Mani is also struggling to see how it would be possible for the event to take place this year.

He said: "In my opinion I think [the World Cup] will probably be deferred for a year. The ICC [International Cricket Council] has time because ICC events were supposed to happen in 2020, 2021 and 2023.

"The gap in the middle can be filled and this will be deferred. That is where the talk is headed towards. What event will happen first and where, those talks are happening.

"It is a big risk that God forbid, in the middle of a big tournament, if a player gets an infection, the panic from that will be too much so we can't take that risk."

He added: "The biggest challenge in Australia - although Australia and New Zealand they have controlled Covid-19 - their governments are very cautious.

"If it is played this year they will likely insist it happens in a bio-bubble. Like with the Pakistan team in England, teams come, stay in a hotel, with no crowds.

"This is okay for one or two teams but when 12-16 teams play in a T20 tournament, it becomes an impossible thing. I don't think it is feasible today that there is any ICC event in 2020."

Mani expects a decision to be made within four weeks.

He said: "Cricket boards are one stakeholder. Another stakeholder is the broadcaster - Star is the broadcaster, they will see their position, what is better for them.

"Other than full members, associates also get money from ICC events so discussions are on with as to what their priorities are.

"But you'll see that in the next three-four weeks a decision will be taken on this. There is a conference call next week. We've had four-five con calls on this in the last month.

"Obviously a decision will have to be made about where the first event will be. Right now it was to be Australia, then India and then a gap of one year and then India for the World Cup.

"Now we have to see whether it will be Australia first, or India, to see who will host in 2022."

Sarfaraz Ahmed feels he can thrive without the pressure of being captain after earning a Pakistan recall for the tour of England.

The wicketkeeper-batsman has not played for his country since he was axed as skipper last October.

Yet Sarfaraz was this week included in a 29-man squad for three Tests and as many Twenty20 Internationals against England in August and September.

And the 33-year-old, who is back-up to Mohammad Rizwan, is relishing being able to concentrate on his own game without the extra responsibility.

"Obviously it was tough to absorb the fact that I was the captain as well as a regular member and then suddenly, I am nowhere," said Sarfaraz.

"You do get upset but I couldn't really dwell on it too much, because I was fortunate that I had domestic cricket there and then came PSL. So, most of the time, I remained busy.

"Then in this free time in the last three months in quarantine, I got time to reflect and improve my fitness to be ready for any opportunity.

"When you are captain in any format, it definitely brings a lot of pressure on you and this is why it's a big responsibility. When you were playing cricket non-stop without a break, relentlessly, then these breaks really help you.

"I've been talking to Misbah [ul-Haq, the Pakistan head coach] and he was urging me to utilise this time to work smartly to improve my fitness and reflect on what I have been doing wrong.

"When you are captain you basically think differently - more about the team than yourself. Your main focus is on the team result and performances, and in all this you spent more time supporting your players.

"But now I don't have that added responsibility and I will be thinking exclusively how I can play my part as a player in any situation where I am needed.

"Overall, I realised that this seven or eight-month gap away from the national team has helped me rediscover myself as player."

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) is determined to "deliver meaningful and long-term change" after acknowledging sport is "not immune" to systemic racism.

George Floyd's death while in police custody in Minneapolis last month led to protests in the United States and far beyond.

Former England batsman Michael Carberry this week stated that cricket is "rife with racism" and "black people are not important to the structure of English cricket".

James Anderson, England's leading Test wicket-taker, said the national team will have conversations about what they can do to make a stand and be more active in combating racism.

The ECB says it will listen and learn from the Black Lives Matter movement and will act in a bid to break down barriers.

"We have listened carefully to those who have spoken out in recent weeks about their experiences of being black in cricket, sport and society," the governing body said in a statement.

"We admire them for being vocal on this crucial topic. We know that systemic racism spans institutions and sectors across the country and we know that our sport is not immune.

"We truly believe that cricket is a game for everyone but understand that sadly, barriers to its enjoyment exist for many communities. We have made progress in bringing cricket to more and more people around the country and it is our resolve to break down barriers and reform our structures everywhere across the game.

"In recent weeks we have reflected, and acknowledge that black players and fans, who have contributed so much to the history of our game, now feel disenfranchised. They do not feel as if cricket is a game for them. This must change.

"That is why it's so important that we continue to listen to the voices of those who have spoken out, to educate ourselves and face uncomfortable truths in order to create action internally and throughout the game, to ensure long-term change.

"We will now work to engage community leaders and black influencers within cricket so that we can review and evolve our existing inclusion and diversity work and specifically address the issues raised by the black community.

"From there, it is our overall desire to create demonstrable action, in order to deliver meaningful and long-term change that permeates every layer of the game."

World cricket chiefs have approved a ban on using saliva to polish the ball and backed the introduction of coronavirus substitutes.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) gave its approval amid a raft of interim changes to regulations in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic hitting sport.

Rules on kit sponsorship have also been relaxed for 12 months, allowing teams to bring in extra revenue through placing a logo on the chest of their Test shirt and sweater.

There has been no international cricket since March due to the health crisis and the global governing body is keen to mitigate risks posed by the virus, protecting the safety of players and match officials.

Bowlers traditionally apply saliva to the ball to make it swing, but they will have to rely on sweat when the sport returns, with the use of any artificial substance already outlawed.

The saliva ban was passed despite a number of players, including former Australia captain Steve Smith, suggesting it would give batsmen an advantage.

Repeatedly breaching the new rule could result in teams receiving a five-run penalty.

An ICC statement read: "Players will not be permitted to use saliva to shine the ball. If a player does apply saliva to the ball, the umpires will manage the situation with some leniency during an initial period of adjustment for the players, but subsequent instances will result in the team receiving a warning.

"A team can be issued up to two warnings per innings but repeated use of saliva on the ball will result in a five-run penalty to the batting side.

"Whenever saliva is applied to the ball, the umpires will be instructed to clean the ball before play recommences."

Among the other changes will be the introduction of coronavirus replacements for Tests, but not Twenty20 internationals or ODIs.

If a player displays symptoms of COVID-19 during a Test series, teams will be allowed to replace them with "the nearest like-for-like replacement".

The ICC has also removed the requirement for a neutral umpire in all formats, due to restrictions on international travel.

With this perhaps leading to the use of officials with less international experience, an additional unsuccessful DRS review will be granted.

"This will increase the number of unsuccessful appeals per innings for each team to three for Tests and two for the white-ball formats," said the ICC.

"The ICC cricket operations team will support match referees when processing code of conduct breaches, and a neutral elite panel match referee will conduct any hearing remotely via video link."

Steve Smith believes playing in the Indian Premier League later this year would be an enjoyable alternative option if the T20 World Cup is postponed.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) last week stated it is still planning for the World Cup to start in Australia on October 18, but other options are being explored due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It has been reported that the competition will be put back to next year, with the IPL - which could not get under way as scheduled in March - taking place instead of the global event.

Smith, who returned to training with New South Wales on Monday, would prefer to play in a World Cup, but the former Australia captain would also relish the opportunity to lead the Rajasthan Royals later this year. 

The top-ranked Test batsman in the world said: "I think when you're playing for your country at a World Cup, that's the pinnacle for one-day or T20 cricket, so of course I'd prefer to play in that.

"But if that doesn't happen and the IPL's there, and they postpone [the T20 World Cup], then so be it. IPL's also a terrific tournament as a domestic tournament. 

"That's out of everyone's control at the moment, players are just doing what we're told and going where we need to go and playing whatever's on at that stage.

"I guess there'll be some more news about it soon, probably some decisions to be made soon, so I'm sure we'll all find out and know where we're going to be.

"I personally haven't really thought about it, I think it'd just be going off the advice of the professionals and the governments and essentially doing what we're told.

"If that happens then great, if not then there's just so much going on in the world right now that cricket kind of seems a little bit irrelevant. So, we'll get back when we're told to and until then it's sit tight, get fit and strong and freshen up mentally."

Cricket Australia are also considering a request from the England and Wales Cricket Board to tour England for a limited-overs series in September, two months later than planned.

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