Tiger Woods did not only win the 2000 U.S. Open on June 18, he did so having obliterated the rest of the field.

Two decades ago, no one could get near to Woods and his record-breaking performance at Pebble Beach.

Mike Catt got much closer to Jonah Lomu five years earlier, not that he was able to stop him, while Eoin Morgan was delivering his own dominant performance on June 18, 2019.

Here we take a look at three major sporting events to have occurred on June 18 in previous years.

 

1995 - Lomu steamrollers England

Lomu delivered perhaps the finest individual performance at a Rugby World Cup match when starring for New Zealand against England in the 1995 semi-final.

The wing scored four tries as the All Blacks won 45-29 against an England side that simply could not contain the All Blacks' number 11.

His first score was the best, as Lomu collected a ball that bounced behind him, held off two England players and then dismissively ploughed over Catt when off-balance before dotting down.

In another incredible demonstration of speed, Lomu crossed for the fourth time when side-stepping Catt to leave the England back grasping at air.

 

2000 - Woods goes wire-to-wire at Pebble Beach

Stating Woods was the wire-to-wire winner at the 2000 U.S. Open only begins to explain his dominance given his eventual major record 15-stroke advantage.

Woods arrived at the 100th U.S. Open as a two-time major champion and a third looked assured even before the weekend as he had a six-shot lead after 36 holes.

Only playing against himself by the Sunday, Woods parred the opening nine holes before reeling off four birdies in five holes en route to a final-round 67. It was the first of four majors in a row that Woods would win - which became known as the 'Tiger Slam'.

 

2019 - Aerial Eoin dismantles Afghanistan attack

Prior to hosting the World Cup on home soil in 2019, England players had mused on the possibility of becoming the first team in ODI history to score 500 runs.

It did not quite happen, but the reason for such optimism was evident when they took Afghanistan's attack apart in making 397-6 in a group-stage game at Old Trafford.

Several records did fall as captain Morgan made the most sixes in an ODI (17), England accrued the most maximums in an ODI (25) while poor Rashid Khan went for 0-110 off his nine overs.

Morgan, who would end up lifting the trophy later that tournament, finished with a frankly ridiculous 148 from 71 balls before England claimed a 150-run success.

Tiger Woods sealed a historic triumph at the U.S. Open on this day in 2000.

The American won by 15 strokes, which still stands as a record margin of victory at a major.

Woods' display at Pebble Beach is widely regarded as the greatest performance in golf history.

Here is a look at how Woods, then aged 24, secured his most dominant victory.

Round 1: 65 (leads by 1)

Woods issued an early statement of intent with a blemish-free opening round. He made the turn in 33 and proved relentless on the back nine, making a further four gains to move to six under par. Miguel Angel Jimenez was just one shot back.

Round 2: 69 (leads by 6)

The chasing pack, Jimenez included, could not keep pace amid worsening conditions on the Friday. Woods' round was halted by darkness and he returned the next day to finish up and sign for a 69, while Jimenez could only manage a 74 to sit level on two under with Thomas Bjorn, some six shots back from the imperious Woods.

Round 3: 71 (leads by 10)

By the close of the third round, that lead was an unassailable 10 strokes over Ernie Els. Despite having to play 24 holes on the Saturday and making a triple bogey on the third hole of his third round, Woods still left the rest of the field for dead. He finished the day as the only player under par and left the trophy engraver in little doubt as to what he would be carving into the silverware the next day.

Round 4: 67 (leads by 15)

Barring a meltdown of unfathomable proportions, Woods had the title in the bag. Yet he still wanted to finish in style, setting his sights on a bogey-free closing round. That was at risk when he stood over a 15-foot putt to save par at the 16th, but Woods sunk it and celebrated with vigour. It helped him to a final-round 67 and an overall score of 12 under, making it the first double-digit below-par score in tournament history. Jimenez and Els were his closest rivals on three over. The most resounding victory in major golf history was complete.

What they said:

"The only thing I know is I got the trophy sitting right next to me. To perform the way I did, and on one of the greatest venues in golf, it doesn't get much better than that." – Tiger Woods

"We've been talking about him for two years. I guess we'll be talking about him for the next 20. When he's on, we don't have much of a chance." – Ernie Els

"If you were building the complete golfer, you'd build Tiger Woods." – Mark O'Meara

The Golden State Warriors and Tiger Woods both became champions again on June 16 in previous years, while Didier Deschamps' France also started their road to glory in Russia.

Steve Kerr's Warriors have dominated the NBA for much of the past half-decade, but five years ago they were trying to end a long championship drought.

Woods was already a multiple major winner by 2008, though his victory at the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines while he essentially played on one leg was one of his most incredible successes.

Here we take a look at major sporting events that have happened on June 16 in previous years.

 

2008 - Wounded Woods wins U.S. Open play-off

The 2008 U.S. Open had been due to finish on Sunday, June 15 but 72 holes could not separate Woods and veteran Rocco Mediate, so the two came back for 18 more on Monday.

Woods had a three-stroke lead through 10 holes but, clearly hampered by a serious knee injury, he was reeled in by the world number 158 and needed a birdie at the last to force a sudden death.

After 91 holes, Woods eventually emerged victorious to claim his 14th major title - four short of record-holder Jack Nicklaus' haul - though it would be another 11 years before he tasted major success again at the Masters.

It was later revealed Woods had played on with a double stress fracture and a torn anterior cruciate ligament, making his victory all the more remarkable.

2015 - Warriors end title drought

Finals between the Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers would become a regular theme, and it was Stephen Curry and Co. who came out on top in 2015, as they did in 2017 and 2018 too.

The 2015 series had been tied at 2-2 but a 104-91 Game 5 win gave Golden State the chance to end a 40-year wait for another title on June 16, which they did with a 105-97 Game 6 victory.

Curry and Finals MVP Andre Iguodala scored 25 points apiece, with the latter winning praise for his defensive display against LeBron James, who would need to wait another 12 months before he brought a title to the long-suffering Cleveland fans.

2018 - VAR helps France edge past Australia

They may have undoubtedly been the best team at Russia 2018, but France had an underwhelming start to a campaign that would end with them winning the World Cup.

Les Bleus were thankful for VAR when it was used - for the first time ever in a World Cup match - to award them a controversial penalty after Josh Risdon's tackle on Antoine Griezmann originally went punished in Kazan.

Griezmann duly dispatched the penalty but Australia pulled level through Mile Jedinak's spot-kick, only for France to claim a 2-1 win 10 minutes from time courtesy of an own goal from Aziz Behich.

Rory McIlroy has praised the PGA Tour's decision to pay tribute to George Floyd and hopes golf can be a driving force in creating more diversity in sport.

The PGA Tour is scheduled to resume following a three-month coronavirus-enforced hiatus with the Charles Schwab Challenge this weekend.

It was confirmed play will be halted for a minute at 8.46am local time on Thursday and the tee time left vacant in honour of Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25.

The death of Floyd has sparked protests in America and beyond with the Black Lives Matter movement, while several prominent sports stars have made anti-racism messages.

World number one McIlroy is heartened to see the PGA Tour follow other sports in showing its support. 

"I think what the PGA Tour has done with the moment of silence at 8:46am and not using that tee time is a wonderful gesture," McIlroy said.

"A great word that I've been thinking of over the last couple of weeks is 'tolerance'. I think everyone can just be a little more tolerant, and a little more educated and not as ignorant."

McIlroy spoke about his own admiration for 15-time major winner Tiger Woods when discussing issues around racism and prejudice.

"Tiger doesn't look the same as me, has had a very different upbringing to the one that I have had, but he was my hero growing up," McIlroy added.

"It didn't matter what colour his skin was, what his beliefs were. Tiger was my hero, and he's been a lot of kids' heroes over the years that have grown up playing golf.

"I think that there should be more people like him in golf.

"The fact that there does seem to be this real will to change and have reform is amazing. It's been a great thing to see, and I hope it continues to be in the conversation." 

McIlroy has spoken about his desire for the Ryder Cup not to take place without fans but is more relaxed about spectator-free PGA Tour tournaments, even if he acknowledges it will take some getting used to.

The four-time major winner is also unsure how the suspension will have affected his form, with the Northern Irishman having recorded seven straight top-five finishes prior to the break.

"Obviously playing in front of no fans at a Ryder Cup is very different than playing in front of no fans at a PGA Tour event," McIlroy said. 

"Look, it'll be slightly different. It'll be a little eerie that you're not getting claps and you're not getting feedback from good shots and stuff like that, but I think at the same time, it's what we have to do.

"It's what we're going to have to live with for the foreseeable future, and if that's what I have to adapt to be able to get out here and play on Tour and get back to work essentially, then I'm happy to do that.

"It [three months of no PGA Tour] actually gave me an opportunity to work on a few things. I spent 90 days in a row at home for the first time in my adult life.

"I'm eager to get back and I'm eager to play and get back into competition mode, but I'm sort of... expectation-wise, we'll see how it goes. I feel like I'm as sharp as I can be coming in here.

"I've played a lot of golf over the last few weeks and I've practiced a bit. My game seems to be there. It seems to be there at home anyway, so if it's there at home, there's no reason why it shouldn't be there when I get out here."

Tiger Woods has described the death of George Floyd while in police custody as "a shocking tragedy".

The 15-time major winner joined a long list of high-profile sports stars to speak out on the incident that has sparked protests across the United States and beyond.

Floyd died after being handcuffed in Minneapolis, with a widely shared video showing a police officer kneeling on his neck as he pleaded, "I can't breathe".

It has led to civil unrest in many US cities, with Woods – who underlined his "respect for law enforcement" – urging calm. 

"My heart goes out to George Floyd, his loved ones and all of us who are hurting right now," Woods wrote in a statement posted on Twitter.

"I have always had the utmost respect for our law enforcement. They train so diligently to understand how, when and where to use force. This shocking tragedy clearly crossed that line.

"I remember the LA riots and learned that education is the best path forward. We can make our points without burning the very neighbourhoods that we live in.

"I hope that through constructive, honest conversations we can build a safer, unified society."

Elite sport is gradually returning to our screens amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Germany's Bundesliga, the UFC and the NRL were among the first top-level events to forge a route back last month after pausing due to the global crisis.

A clutch of Europe's other top football leagues, cricket, motorsport and the United States' major competitions all have designs on behind-closed-doors resumptions in the near future, too, which could create a significant backlog of crucial fixtures.

One positive is that sports fans might now be treated to a number of colossal match-ups back-to-back on the same day at some point over the coming months.

That prospect gives us the opportunity to reflect on five similar occasions with the greatest sporting days since the turn of the century - including one exactly a year ago.

 

JULY 23, 2000

The US had a day to remember as two of their most prominent stars bolstered their still burgeoning reputations with big victories on foreign soil.

The paths of Tiger Woods and Lance Armstrong have subsequently diverged a little, however.

Woods became the youngest player to complete golf's career grand slam with a record-breaking victory at The Open in 2000, while Armstrong wrapped up a second straight Tour de France title.

The American duo stood at the top of the world, yet history will recall Armstrong's achievements rather differently now he has been stripped of each of his seven successive yellow jerseys for doping.

Woods at least maintained his high standards and held all four major titles after the 2001 Masters, winning again at Augusta as recently as last year.

FEBRUARY 1, 2004

Two more sporting greats shared the same special page in the calendar early in 2004.

It was a long day for anyone who took in both Roger Federer's performance in Melbourne's Australian Open final and Tom Brady's Super Bowl display in Houston, but they were duly rewarded.

Twenty-time grand slam champion Federer had won just one major before facing down Marat Safin in Australia, also becoming the ATP Tour's top-ranked player for the first time. He stayed at number one for a record-shattering 237 weeks.

Brady similarly then doubled his tally of Super Bowl rings by delivering a second triumph in three years for the Patriots, in what was a classic encounter against the Carolina Panthers.

Brady threw for 354 yards and three touchdowns, before Adam Vinatieri's field goal secured a 32-29 win with four seconds remaining.

AUGUST 4-5, 2012

One would struggle to find a greater array of star-studded athletes of various sports than those who congregated in London across the penultimate weekend of the 2012 Olympic Games.

On the Saturday evening, at the Aquatics Centre, swimming prepared to say goodbye to its greatest name. Michael Phelps and the United States won the 4x100m medley, clinching his 18th gold medal in what appeared set to be his final race.

Indeed, Phelps confirmed his retirement following the Games, only to return in predictably dominant fashion in 2016.

Across the city that same night, Team GB athletes were capping a stunning run of medals that would see the day dubbed "Super Saturday". There were six home golds in all, including big wins for Jessica Ennis, Greg Rutherford and Mo Farah in quick succession.

The drama only continued the next day, too, as Andy Murray finally sealed a Wimbledon win over Federer in the tennis event, while Usain Bolt lit up London Stadium in the 100m.

JUNE 1, 2019

It is 12 months to the day since another epic sporting stretch, one that concluded in stunning fashion with one of boxing's great modern upsets.

Rugby union and football each had their respective turns in the spotlight earlier, with Saracens following up their European Champions Cup success - a third in four years - by retaining the Premiership title with victory over Exeter Chiefs.

In Madrid, two more English teams were in action as Liverpool edged past Tottenham in the Champions League final.

But as Sarries and the Reds celebrated, focus turned towards Madison Square Garden where Anthony Joshua was expected to make light work of Andy Ruiz Jr, a replacement for Jarrell Miller following a failed drugs test.

The heavyweight title match did not go to script, however, as Ruiz floored Joshua four times and forced a stoppage to claim his belts, albeit only until the rematch where the Briton saved face.

JULY 14, 2019

These crazy spectacles have largely seen sport spread throughout the day, but three sets of eyes were required to keep up with the action on an epic afternoon last July.

With England hosting and then reaching the Cricket World Cup final, the scene-stealing decider fell on the same day as the Wimbledon men's final and the British Grand Prix, ensuring the United Kingdom was the focus of the sporting world.

The cricket started off several hours before either the tennis or the F1 but still managed to outlast its rival events, with Ben Stokes determined to put on a show as England won via a dramatic Super Over at the end of a nine-hour saga against New Zealand.

Novak Djokovic was battling Stokes for attention as he was taken all the way by that man Federer at the All England Club before finally prevailing 7-6 (7-5) 1-6 7-6 (7-4) 4-6 13-12 (7-3) in the tournament's longest singles final.

The respective classics made the British GP, completed earlier in the day, something of an afterthought - but not for Lewis Hamilton, who claimed a record sixth victory.

The face staring down the lens of the camera at the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office is familiar, and yet almost unrecognisable.

With hair unkempt, eyes lifeless and the beginnings of an uncultivated beard, it is in many ways just another ordinary mugshot.

But the man in the picture is not ordinary, far from it; the man in the picture is Tiger Woods.

It was on May 29, 2017 that Woods reached his nadir, and the world bore witness to it, aghast as the photograph spread rapidly across news sources and social media.

That image, captured after his arrest on suspicion of driving under the influence, demanded a second look just to make sure you could believe your eyes.

With a countenance that betrayed his inner tumult, Woods' fall from grace was painfully apparent.

The very existence of that mugshot, the fact that such a scenario should ever have transpired, has only become more remarkable with the passage of time.

Had Woods not revived his life and career to such a glorious extent that he was tasting major success again by the time of the 2019 Masters, the image would have served as a stark cautionary tale, a reminder that even great talent and vast wealth cannot shelter someone from the consequences of following their own worst impulses.

It would have plagued him, accompanying stories of further misdemeanours and transgressions to sit alongside his charge for reckless driving, having been found to have had five different drugs in his system at this time of his arrest. 

Instead, that shot of Woods is more of a bizarre curio from an alternate reality he briefly occupied, one which would have led him to somewhere very different from the place he is today.

For as shocking as his decline may have been, the comeback is more apt to take one's breath away. It is harder to climb than it is to fall.

Tiger's ascent back to the peak led to pictures altogether more joyous, the celebrations that greeted the confirmation of his 15th major win captured in images where Woods – two years older than in his mugshot – looks a decade younger.

Woods' Augusta exultation capped an extraordinary return to the top, making an impostor of the man in the mugshot. 

Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning earned bragging rights against Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady in "The Match", but charity was the real winner.

It was an all-star cast for The Match: Champions for Charity – arranged to raise funds for coronavirus relief efforts – as 15-time major champion Woods teamed up with two-time Super Bowl winner Manning.

Woods and Manning secured a 1up victory over Mickelson and six-time Super Bowl champion Brady in Hobe Sound, Florida on Sunday.

Mickelson and Brady made a late surge on the back nine, but Woods and Manning held on at Medalist Golf Club, where social distancing was front and centre.

More importantly, over $20million was raised to help with COVID-19 relief amid the pandemic, which has wreaked havoc globally.

Bad weather delayed the charity contest by 45 minutes but there was plenty of fun and entertainment once the players teed off, with PGA Tour star Justin Thomas and NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley headlining the broadcast.

The star quartet exchanged banter, while Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Brady struggled early.

Brady did not look like the NFL's G.O.A.T with a golf club in hand, until holing out for birdie from the fairway at the par-four fifth hole in South Florida.

Team Brady and Mickelson rallied, however, the Woods-Manning pairing were not to be denied.

"It's great, the fact that we all came together and we were able to raise $20million for those that have been so severely affected," said Woods, with the PGA Tour planning to return next month after golf was suspended in March due to the COVID-19 crisis. "This is our arena. This is what we do. We couldn't imagine going out onto the field and doing what they do."

Former NFL quarterback Manning said: "I know Tom and I were kind of comparing notes and feelings to each other. To go behind the ropes in these guys' world and kind of be in the arena with them, it was a really special experience. I was not comfortable the entire time, from the first tee all the way down here."

Mickelson – a five-time major winner – added: "We fought hard. I was a little nervous, a little tight on the front nine. My man kept us in there, and the back nine he really shined. We made a run and came really close."

Is there anything Tom Brady cannot do?

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers superstar and six-time NFL Super Bowl champion holed out from the fairway in "The Match" on Sunday.

Featuring in the all-star charity contest – arranged to raise funds for coronavirus relief efforts – alongside Phil Mickelson, Brady had struggled with the golf club against Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning.

Brady, who swapped the New England Patriots for the Buccaneers via free agency in the offseason, is regarded as the greatest NFL player of all time but he looked human at Medalist Golf Club.

That was until Brady produced an unforgettable moment of magic – holing out for birdie from 100 yards at the par-four fifth hole in Hobe Sound, Florida.

Reigning Super Bowl MVP and Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes, like many others, was left stunned.

"You got to be kidding!!!!! #TheMatch2," Mahomes wrote on Twitter.

Peyton Manning went one up on Tom Brady with quick-witted jibes before the first tee shot was struck ahead of "The Match".

The start of the all-star charity contest – arranged to raise funds for COVID-19 relief efforts – in which Manning has teamed up with Tiger Woods to face Brady and Phil Mickelson was delayed due to the wet weather in South Florida on Sunday.

When the quartet took to the range it was Manning who fired an early blow when asked who his caddie might have been if the quartet had someone to carry their bags at Medalist Golf Club.

With Tampa Bay Buccaneers new boy Brady in earshot lining up a practice shot, Manning replied to a reporter: "Do you bring Eli [Manning, his brother]? Could do that.

"Do you bring Nick Foles? Maybe."

Brady turned out and replied: "That's a cheap shot."

Manning was not finished yet, adding: "I was thinking maybe Bill Belichick ... just to see how that kind of would have worked."

Woods, wearing his famous Sunday red, and Mickelson ensured the first hole was halved after their legendary quarterback team-mates were wayward from the tee in the rain with concerns that a storm may be on the way.

Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning's charity match against Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady will be held at Medalist Golf Club in Florida on May 24.

The venue and date were confirmed on Thursday as the golfing and NFL greats do battle to raise funds for COVID-19 relief.

WarnerMedia and the golfers are donating $10million towards the cause, a statement said on Thursday.

Woods/Manning will take on Mickelson/Brady in a team matchplay with a four-ball format on the front nine and modified alternate shot format on the back nine, with the event sanctioned by the PGA Tour.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unimaginable tragedy and heartbreak," WarnerMedia news and sports chairman Jeff Zucker said.

"We're hopeful this event and platform will help raise meaningful funding for COVID-19 relief, while also providing a source of brief distraction and entertainment for all sports fans."

All players will have open mics throughout the event, which comes with most sports around the world brought to a standstill by coronavirus.

There have been more than 270,200 deaths from COVID-19.

Mickelson and Woods previously faced off in a match in November 2018, when the former won on the fourth play-off hole.

NBA great turned noted basketball pundit Charles Barkley recently named basketball legend Michael Jordan and golfer Tiger Woods as the two greatest athletes he has seen in his lifetime.  Surely, he has never tuned in to track and field to witness the exploits of Jamaican sprint king Usain Bolt.

Of course, at first glance, I chalked up Barkley’s comments to the long-extolled values of ‘America first’, commonplace for USA sporting analysts and popular in that arena long before President Donald Trump weaponized the ideology to disastrous effect. 

After all, it is routine for the US to refer to its national sporting champions as world champions, despite playing the competition only within the country’s borders and excluding other contenders around the globe.

Resisting the urge to completely dismiss the observance as humdrum, overly exuberant nationalist fervour, I decided I took a closer look.  It’s a lot closer than you would think.

There is often a tendency to try to forget the greatness of Tiger by looking at the player’s recent injury issues and scandal-hit career, forgetting that at his best Tiger was one of the most dominant players to ever play a sport.

For starters, at the age of 20, Woods became the first man to win three consecutive U.S. Amateur titles. He was the youngest to win the Masters, the fastest ever to ascend to No. 1 in the World Golf Rankings and, at 24, the youngest to win the career Grand Slam.

In addition, he held on to the No. 1 ranking for 281 consecutive weeks, which is to say five-plus years. His 82 PGA Tour wins has him tied with Sam Snead for the most ever and nine ahead another legendary golfer, Jack Nicklaus.  Tiger's 15 major titles leave him three behind Nicklaus but he is no longer a sure bet to break that record.  For some, this means he might never be the greatest golfer, but let's leave that argument for the time being. 

In addition to his remarkable achievements, Tiger’s propensity to always shine when the lights were brightest made the game of golf sexy.  From massive sponsorship deals to a major increase in prize money, he revolutionized the game.

But, without taking anything away anything from Tiger, he still doesn’t quite measure up to the legend of Bolt.

 In a sport like track and field where dominance often seems to barely last longer than the 10-second dash to the line, Bolt’s near-decade-long supremacy is unprecedented.

The sprinter’s haul of 14 World Championships (11 gold), 8 Olympic Games medals combined with three earth-shattering world records speaks volumes for themselves.  But, in a sport where the winner is defined by mere fractions of a second, Bolt’s four-year 45 race winning streak over 100m is a feat in and of itself.  His longest undefeated streak in the 200 m was in 17 finals, lasting from 12 June 2008 to 3 September 2011.  There is an endless number of statistics that could be added to the pile on this comparison but that isn’t really the point.   

The simple fact of the matter is that Bolt, like Jordan, had in the same vein a potently combined aura of invincibility and transcendental quality that Tiger does not.

 Outside of the US, little boys and girls around the globe took up their basketballs and dreamt of being like Mike.  On tracks around the world, no matter what the surface, after seeing or hearing of his surreal Olympic feats, kids took off running as they fantasized about being like Bolt.  Tiger would, of course, have influenced some to play golf but to imagine a level of influence anywhere close to the other two is surely a bridge too far.

Both the symbols of Bolt and Jordan, the 'Jumpman' and lighting Bolt, after all, became trademarks associated with triumph, conquest, excellence, and unquestionable status as the ultimate competitor.  I’m not sure the same could be said about Tiger's swingman. Oh wait, there is no swingman.

 

Manchester City will reflect fondly on the date of April 30.

It was on this day eight years ago that victory in the Manchester derby saw them scale the Premier League's summit.

The same date holds less happy memories for Tiger Woods, however.

And it will forever be etched into the mind of Monica Seles for all the wrong reasons.

 

2012 – Kompany heads City to the summit in derby triumph

Vincent Kompany's header in first-half stoppage time sealed a 1-0 victory for Manchester City over bitter rivals United on this day in 2012.

It was a crucial effort from the captain, taking his side back to the top of the table on goal difference with two games remaining.

Just three weeks earlier Roberto Mancini's side had fallen eight points behind United.

City went on to win the Premier League title for the first time with a last-gasp final-day win over QPR.

1993 – Shock as Seles is stabbed on court

It was 27 years ago that tennis star Seles was the victim of a shocking on-court attack during a match in Hamburg.

Facing Magdalena Maleeva, Seles was in a break between games when a crazed fan of her rival Steffi Graf ran onto the court and stabbed her between the shoulder blades.

The injuries and psychological damage were significant, with Seles out of action for two years.

She had eight grand slams to her name at the time of the incident and went on to win one more, with victory at the 1996 Australian Open.

2010 – Rare missed cut for Woods

Prior to his injury problems and personal issues, missed cuts were incredibly rare for Woods.

On this day in 2010 he suffered such a fate for just the sixth time in his professional career, carding a seven-over 43 on the back nine at Quail Hollow to finish with 79.

Having shot a first-round 74, his two-day total of 153 was his worst.

Attempting to put a positive spin on things, Woods said: "Well, I got the weekend off."

Tiger Woods revealed the "trash talk" has already started as he and Peyton Manning prepare to face Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady in a televised charity golf match next month.

The superstar quartet will raise funds for COVID-19 relief when they do battle in May, with a date and venue yet to be confirmed.

Mickelson came out on top in a winner-takes-all $9million pay-per-view duel with Woods in November 2018.

Woods says there have already been some good-natured exchanges over their next contest, which should generate even more interest with NFL stars Brady and Manning set to tee off for a great cause.

The 15-time major champion told Golf Digest: "It's gonna be Peyton and I against Tom and Phil, and we're gonna have a great time doing it.

"All the money and proceeds are going to go to all the COVID relief efforts. We haven't decided exactly what charities we're going to be donating the money to, but we're gonna be divvying it out to a lot of different causes."

Woods added: "There has been a little bit of trash talk already, a little bit of banter back and forth.

"Whether it's 'I might need extra caddies to carry my Super Bowls,' because he [Brady] has more Super Bowls than my partner. Or, 'I've got more majors than Phil, so I'm gonna have to have a truck come up to the first tee and U-Haul it out'.

"We've had banter back and forth, and it's been fantastic. But it's typical us, it's what we do. We like to give out the needle, and to give out the needle you gotta be able to take it.

"It's been fun, and it'll be like that when we play, when we compete. There will be banter back and forth, but it won't be as rough as what we have in our text exchange."

Tiger Woods' sensational triumph at the 2019 Masters is proof he can surpass Jack Nicklaus' record major haul, but it would be nice if he finished his career tied with the 'Golden Bear', says Padraig Harrington.

A year ago, Woods ended a painful 11-year wait to once again win one of golf's big four tournaments when he overcame a two-shot deficit at the start of round four to secure a fifth green jacket.

It was Woods' 15th major victory, but now aged 44, time is running out for him to overhaul Nicklaus' benchmark of 18.

However, Harrington – a three-time major winner and Europe's next Ryder Cup captain – labelled Woods as the greatest ever and thinks he can still achieve the feat, even though he would love to see the two legends share the record.

"There's no doubt it was a great moment for golf, I was amazed by the style he did it in," Harrington told Stats Perform.

"I always thought he was going to win another major, now I actually think he can get to the 18 or 19.

"At the time before that I was thinking Tiger is good enough to get himself in contention, he'll be having a good week and when he's there the old Tiger will come back and he'll make a few birdies, a bit like Nicklaus winning the Masters in '86, and other guys will fall away.

"I just didn't think he'd win it the way he did - Tiger dominated that last round, the players ran away from him like it was the Tiger of old, it was a surprise to me.

"I knew Tiger could win another major, but I thought he'd win it like everyone else, get in the right position and one or two things happen at the end, but this was a dominant performance.

"It's different to what I expected, it showed he was in control, it wasn't circumstances. The likelihood is he could do that again and that's why I think now he can win another three majors.

"I'd personally like him to win another three, not four. It would be nice if he tied with Jack. I think Jack was great for the game.

"I personally think Tiger is the best player ever, I never got to play with Jack in his prime so I don't necessarily want him to beat such a legend, a tie would be very nice in my eyes, so let's hope he gets another three."

This year's Masters was postponed due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and is now slated to take place in November.

Woods' history of back injuries is well documented, and Harrington says only he will know if the extra time will be good for him physically.

"I think at the moment Tiger was struggling, his injuries do seem to be there, there's a lot of ups and downs in his injuries," Harrington added.

"In November he could be just as injured or he could be much better, we're never quite 100 ,per cent sure.

"He would have been trying to compete for Augusta, Tiger tends to get these things right too, so you'd think he'd be getting right and getting his back ready for Augusta.

"Another six months would be good for his back, or I think it would be. He's six months older, I don't know really. Tiger's really the only one who can tell if this is positive or negative in terms of how he feels his physical state will be.

"It's funny, we're talking mental state for everyone else and it's Tiger's physical state we're thinking of.

"But look, everybody will make the most of their opportunity when they get there, I don't see it making a huge difference. If you're serious about winning Augusta, you're going to be preparing for that April week, now you're going to be preparing for November."

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