Harris English is among four tied for the lead at the Northern Trust, while Tiger Woods made a solid start on Thursday.

English, Kevin Streelman, Cameron Davis and Russell Henley carded seven-under 64s in the first round at TPC Boston.

The quartet hold a one-stroke lead after their fine starts at the opening event of the FedEx Cup play-offs.

The leaderboard is congested, with Woods' three-under 68 only enough to be tied for 30th.

The 15-time major champion started on the back nine and was even through 11 before making birdies on four of six holes.

As he looked set to finish with a 67, Woods bogeyed his final hole, while Justin Thomas and defending champion Patrick Reed also managed 68s.

There are seven players tied for fifth at six under, with Louis Oosthuizen, Charley Hoffman, Scott Piercy, Bubba Watson, Kevin Kisner, Sebastian Munoz and Matthew Wolff shooting 65s.

Watson, who has missed six cuts in 14 events this year, carded seven birdies and a bogey to make a strong start.

Two-time Northern Trust winner Dustin Johnson opened with a four-under 67 to be in a tie for 20th.

The US PGA Championship runner-up was five under through 13 holes before producing two bogeys either side of his birdie at the sixth.

Rickie Fowler, who has struggled this year, also started with a 67.

Hoping to kick-start his year, Rory McIlroy carded a two-under 69 to be in a group tied for 53rd, alongside the likes of Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose and Jon Rahm.

In action for the first time since winning the US PGA, Collin Morikawa battled to an even-par 71.

Tiger Woods will play the PGA Tour's BMW Championship next week, it was confirmed on Wednesday.

Woods – already in the field for the Northern Trust starting Thursday – has entered the BMW Championship, marking the first time the 15-time major winner has played in back-to-back weeks in a year.

The 44-year-old American superstar last made back-to-back Tour starts at last season's Northern Trust and BMW Championship.

Woods – 49th in the FedEx Cup standings – could potentially play four tournaments in five weeks, including the U.S. Open, which begins on September 17 in New York.

''The plan is to play four out of five,'' Woods said following Wednesday's nine holes at TPC Boston ahead of the Northern Trust, where he is making just his seventh start of the season. ''That's the plan.''

Woods needs to move into the FedEx Cup's top 30 in order to qualify for the Tour Championship, which he has won on three occasions – his most recent triumph in 2018.

The Northern Trust is the first of three play-off events that will bring the coronavirus-affected 2019-20 PGA Tour season to a conclusion.

Woods, winner of the FedEx Cup in 2007 and 2009, finished tied for 37th at the US PGA Championship.

Tiger Woods has confirmed he will play at next week's Northern Trust as he seeks a third FedEx Cup trophy.

The tournament in Boston is the first of three playoff events that will bring the coronavirus-affected 2019-20 PGA Tour season to a conclusion.

Woods, winner of the FedEx Cup in 2007 and 2009, would be the first player to claim the honour three times.

He confirmed his participation at TPC Boston on Twitter on Friday, writing: "Excited to head to Boston for @TheNTGolf and start the #FedExCup Playoffs."

Woods, A 15-time major winner, finished in a tie for 37th at the recent US PGA Championship.

The American has been increasingly selective with his schedule as he manages his workload to mitigate injury and fitness concerns.

Indeed, the Northern Trust would be just the sixth event of the season for the 44-year-old, who will need to force his way into the top 70 of the FedEx Cup standings to progress to the next event, the BMW Championship, at the end of the month.

If Blink 182 are to be believed, nobody likes you when you're 23. 

Not that Collin Morikawa will care much if the song lyric is true, given he will start a new week as a major winner following his stunning US PGA Championship victory. 

A flawless six-under-par 64 in Sunday's final round earned the up-and-coming American a two-shot win from Dustin Johnson and Paul Casey. 

Only two men - Gene Sarazen (twice) and Tom Creavy - won the tournament before turning 23, while Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy were the same age as Morikawa when they triumphed. 

Esteemed company for Morikawa, then. Here is what the new major champion will now try and live up to. 

Jack Nicklaus (1963 - aged 23 years, six months) 

'The Golden Bear' was already a two-time major winner by the time he claimed the PGA Championship for the first time at the Dallas Athletic Club in July 1963. Nicklaus was three strokes back of leader Bruce Crampton heading into the final round but wound up winning by two shots from Dave Ragan. Nicklaus' haul of 18 majors remains a record, while his five PGA Championship triumphs is a joint-best with Walter Hagen.  

 
Tiger Woods (1999 - aged 23 years, seven months) 

In a memorable Medinah battle with fellow youngster Sergio Garcia, Woods prevailed to win the PGA Championship 21 years ago. He led Garcia by five after the 11th but stumbled down the stretch and triumphed by a solitary stroke. The American now has 15 majors to his name, while Garcia has just the one having been tipped to win multiple during those early years. Woods has four PGA Championship wins to his name, the last of which came in 2007. 

 
Rory McIlroy (2012, aged 23 years, three months) 

A couple of 67s sandwiched a 75 prior to a magical Sunday at Kiawah Island for a still fresh-faced McIlroy. The Northern Irishman needed just 24 putts in a round of 66 en route to winning by a record eight strokes as his nearest rivals stumbled. It was the first of McIlroy's two wins at the PGA Championship, the other coming two years later. Arguably the biggest surprise is the fact McIlroy has not yet managed to add another major since, with the former world number one stuck on four. 

Collin Morikawa claimed his maiden major triumph with a thrilling two-stroke victory at the US PGA Championship on Sunday.

The American, 23, got the better of a tight pack bidding for victory at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco thanks to some late brilliance.

Morikawa's final five holes included an eagle and a birdie as he fired a final-round six-under 64 to finish at 13 under.

Previously a two-time winner on the PGA Tour, Morikawa – playing his second major – chipped in for birdie at 14 before producing an incredible tee shot at 16 and holding his nerve to make eagle.

Morikawa is the third youngest US PGA winner since 1946, only behind Jack Nicklaus (1963) and Rory McIlroy (2012).

It came under enormous pressure during a thrilling final round in which seven players were at one stage tied for the lead with the last pairing on the back nine.

Dustin Johnson, the 2016 U.S. Open champion, was among that group and look favoured for a second major triumph, but the American finished as runner-up with Paul Casey (66) at 11 under after a 68.

Matthew Wolff (65), Jason Day (66), Bryson DeChambeau (66), Tony Finau (66) and Scottie Scheffler (68) finished in the group tied for fourth.

Bidding to win a third straight US PGA title, Brooks Koepka struggled massively to a 74.

McIlroy (68) finished tied for 33rd at two under, a shot ahead of Tiger Woods, who fired his best round of the tournament with a 67.

With the final pairing on the back nine, seven players – Johnson, Day, Morikawa, Finau, Scheffler, Casey and Wolff – were tied for the lead at 10 under.

Wolff was the clubhouse leader following his 65, but Morikawa edged ahead thanks to some brilliance at the 14th, chipping in after leaving an approach short.

Scheffler, in the final pairing alongside Johnson, slipped out of the leading group following a bogey at 13.

Bryson DeChambeau, who made a red-hot start before dropping back-to-back shots at eight and nine, joined the group chasing Morikawa thanks to a birdie at 16.

Johnson dropped back to nine under after finding the bunker at 14, while Morikawa missed a chance to stretch his lead to two.

Despite finding two bunkers at the last, Day carded a 66 to join Wolff in the clubhouse lead.

Casey joined Morikawa at 11 under after a superb shot out of the bunker at 16 led to a birdie, but the latter produced some more magic.

Morikawa put his 293-yard tee shot at the par-four 16th to within seven feet and made the clutch putt to pull two clear, pars at the final two holes closing out his victory.

Morikawa's biggest hiccup of the day came when lifting the Wanamaker Trophy as the lid flew off during the presentation, but the victor was all smiles.

Tiger Woods felt he had cause for optimism after carding a three-under 67 in his final round at the US PGA Championship, although he was a long way short of title contention.

The 15-time major champion was out of the running in San Francisco heading into Sunday's last 18 holes after consecutive 72s left him two over par for the week.

There was improvement from Woods as the tournament came to a close, however, carding three birdies across the first seven holes.

Although a bogey followed at the eighth, the American made two more gains on the back nine before finishing in disappointing fashion with five at the par-four 18th.

Woods' best score of the week meant he was eight shy of Dustin Johnson as the leaders prepared to head out.

"What I got out of this week is that I felt I was competitive," Woods said.

"If I would have made a few more putts on Friday early on, and the same thing with Saturday, I feel like would have been right there with a chance come today.

"It didn't happen, but I fought hard. That's golf. We lose way more tournaments than we win."

Explaining his fourth-round performance, he added: "I drove it like I did on Friday, my irons were a little crisper and I hit better putts.

"I wanted an under-par tournament score yesterday and made it happen today."

Indeed, Woods fared better than some of the other big names out on the course early on Sunday.

Rory McIlroy was struggling to improve his even-par overall score in an inconsistent round until following a birdie at the 15th with an eagle at the next, while Phil Mickelson finished with a double-bogey that left him four over for the week.

However, Jordan Spieth belatedly found some form, recovering to the same score as Mickelson with a 67.

Brooks Koepka remains in contention to complete a US PGA Championship three-peat after keeping new leader Dustin Johnson in his sights on Saturday.

Johnson will take a one-stroke advantage into the final round after firing a crisp 65 to reach nine under, but the 2019 runner-up looks set to face a strong challenge from the man who beat him to last year's title.

Back-to-back champion Koepka (69) picked up two shots over the final three holes to recover from a potentially damaging run of three straight bogeys.

Overnight leader Li Haotong coped less successfully with the pressure, carding a costly three-over 73 that included three bogeys and a double at the 13th.

Johnson, four shots back through 36 holes, ran into trouble with a double bogey of his own at the ninth, before steadying to finish with eight birdies on moving day.

The one-time major champion holds a narrow lead over Scottie Scheffler (65) and Cameron Champ (67), who are tied for second.

Cole Morikawa (65) and Paul Casey (68) are level with Koepka at seven under, but all eyes will be on the 30-year-old American on Sunday.

He could become the first golfer to win the tournament three times in a row since Walter Hagen in the 1920s.

Six men, including the improving Bryson DeChambeau (66) and 2015 winner Jason Day (70), are a further shot back at six under.

Tiger Woods fell well out of contention after carding a two-over 72 for the second successive round.

Tiger Woods conceded he was running out of time to win major titles after falling out of contention at the US PGA Championship on Saturday.

The 44-year-old American shot a two-over 72 for the second successive round to leave him with little to play for leading into the final day at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco.

It will end as another opportunity missed for the reigning Masters champion in his bid to equal Jack Nicklaus' record of 18 major victories.

Woods has managed 15 over a 24-year professional career, but only one since 2008.

"There's not as many [opportunities to win] as when I first started playing," Woods said after completing his round.

"The reality is that the golf courses are getting bigger. They are getting longer. The margin between making the cut and the lead is a lot smaller than it used to be. Used to be sometimes 12 to 15 shots.

"Now we had, what, nine shots here? It's just different. It's getting tighter and it's getting harder to win events, but you look at the leaderboard of most major championships, you see the same guys.

“May not be always the same winners, but you see the same handful of guys are there.

“They understand how to win major championships, how to win the big events, how to plod their way along, how difficult it is to win these big events."

Putting again proved a problem for Woods as he failed to make a birdie until the 16th hole.

Though well behind the contenders, Woods said he had a clear goal in mind for the final round.

"You just keep fighting, no matter what," he said. "Whether the rounds are shooting 61s or shooting 81s, the intensity should always be there, the effort should always be there.

"I keep fighting until the end [with] pride in what I do. I love to compete. Unfortunately I didn't do my job today.

"At the end it clicked and hopefully I can get something going tomorrow and get into the red for the tournament."

Li Haotong will take a surprise two-stroke lead into the weekend at the US PGA Championship after an impressive second round.

The 25-year-old is bidding to become the first Chinese man to win a major and is well-placed at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco.

Li backed up his opening-round 67 with a five-under 65, moving to eight under and into a two-shot lead.

He produced a bogey-free round that featured five birdies to sit clear of Brooks Koepka (68), Jason Day (69), Tommy Fleetwood (64), Daniel Berger (67), Justin Rose (68) and Mike Lorenzo-Vera (68).

Koepka's bid for a third straight US PGA title remains well and truly alive despite the American needing treatment on his hip during his second round.

The four-time major champion birdied his final hole to be in the six-way tie for second on what remains a congested leaderboard.

Day, who shared the overnight lead with Brendon Todd (70), was among those challenged in the tougher conditions later in the day.

But none of that group could catch Li, who spent hours practising after his round was over.

Todd, Paul Casey (67) and Cameron Champ (64) are tied for eighth at five under, while several big names have endured a mixed start to the tournament.

Dustin Johnson continued his consistent start with a 67 to be at four under, alongside the likes of Xander Schauffele (70).

The likes of Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, Jordan Spieth and Justin Thomas, though, were at risk of missing the cut.

While Woods (72) never got going, McIlroy (69) got on a roll that included four straight birdies before undoing his good work at the 12th, where he made a triple bogey after finding the rough.

Woods and McIlroy are even and one under respectively, while Spieth (68) and Thomas (70) made the cut by a stroke, sitting at one over.

Rickie Fowler, meanwhile, saw his run of 14 consecutive majors without missing the cut end after following up his 73 with a 69.

While Sergio Garcia also missed the cut, 2010 champion Martin Kaymer failed to reach the weekend, shooting a 12-over 82 a day after his opening 66.

Meanwhile, Cameron Tringale was disqualified from the event for the second time after signing an incorrect scorecard.

Jason Day and Brendon Todd share a one-stroke lead on a congested leaderboard after the first round of the US PGA Championship on Thursday.

Day, the 2015 champion, carded a bogey-free five-under 65 at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco.

The Australian capitalised on favourable early conditions and made five birdies to sit a stroke clear of nine players, alongside Todd.

Todd produced the best round of those in action later in the day, although he mixed seven birdies with two bogeys.

Bidding to win a third straight US PGA title, Brooks Koepka is among that group after shooting a four-under 66.

Koepka mixed six birdies with two bogeys as the American continued to grow in confidence after a runner-up finish at the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational.

Martin Kaymer, the 2010 champion, Scottie Scheffler, Xander Schauffele, Bud Cauley, Zach Johnson, Justin Rose, Brendan Steele and Mike Lorenzo-Vera are also in a tie for third.

Rose was just one under with six holes to play in his round, but the Englishman managed three birdies to be in contention.

In action for just the second time since the PGA Tour season restarted in June, 15-time major champion Tiger Woods opened with a two-under 68.

The American was even through his first 12 holes before a strong finish saw him birdie three of four holes prior to dropping another shot.

Bryson DeChambeau accidentally broke his driver during his first round and was twice four under, but finished with a 68.

Dustin Johnson carded a one-under 69 to be tied for 33rd, a shot better off than four-time major champion Rory McIlroy, who battled to his 70.

Jon Rahm also struggled to get going on his way to a 70, while 2017 champion Justin Thomas fired a 71.

Jordan Spieth's hopes of completing a career Grand Slam this year took a hit, the American again battling as he opened with a 73 that included five bogeys. Rickie Fowler also shot an opening-round 73.

Tiger Woods made a steady start to his quest for a fifth US PGA Championship but an eye-catching 66 from Brooks Koepka suggested history could be made this weekend in San Francisco.

A two-under 68 from Woods meant the 44-year-old was three shots off the early clubhouse pace set by Jason Day at TPC Harding Park, in golf's first major of the disrupted 2020 season.

Koepka was only one behind Day, however, raising the prospect of a title challenge from the man who is chasing a hat-trick of consecutive US PGA titles.

Woods has twice triumphed at the US PGA in consecutive years (1999-2000, 2006-2007), but nobody has taken the title three years in succession in the stroke-play era.

That is the challenge Koepka is embracing, with the 30-year-old recovering well after dropping a shot at his second hole, having started on the back nine.

Koepka said on Sky Sports: "I just keep playing one shot at a time, one hole at a time, keep plugging away. I'm playing so good that... I hit a good putt at 11 and it just didn't go in, I just over-read it a little bit, but other than that I played everything pretty much how I wanted to. I played really well."

Koepka had been struggling for form since the PGA Tour returned until tying for second last time out at the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational.

He had a closing 80 at the Memorial Tournament and missed the cut at the Workday Charity Open and 3M Open, but Koepka loves to produce on the big stage.

"It's a major, I'll get up for it," Koepka said. "It's a little bit of confidence I guess, maybe a little bit, but at the end of the day I just feel good, I'm playing good, and there's no reason to be scientific with all the numbers and stuff. You just go out and play."

Koepka, playing two groups ahead of Woods, parred his way home after making birdie at two and four – his 11th and 13th holes.

By contrast, there was anguish across Woods' face as he missed a par putt at the eighth – his 17th hole – after a brilliant bunker shot, knocking him back from three under.

Woods, nonetheless, was happy with his efforts, and felt scoring would become tougher later in the day due to increasing winds.

The tournament was being played without spectators, meaning there was no crowd energy for the players to feed off, nor any familiar applause as they were introduced for the start of their rounds.

Asked if he was satisfied with how he played, Woods said: "Yeah, I was. I figured we were going to get the more favourable of the conditions today, with the wind supposed to pick up, which it is now.

"The golf course is only going to get more difficult.

"Some of these pins were a little on the difficult side, but overall this golf course is all about hitting fairways, and if you're able to hit the fairway you can get after some of these flags."

Woods was playing with a new putter for the first time, and said: "I've been messing about with it for the better part of over a year.

"It's a little bit longer than my original one, which makes it a little easier on my back. I was able to spend more time practising."

Koepka had plenty of company at four under, with Americans Scottie Scheffler, Xander Schauffele, Zach Johnson, Bud Cauley and Brendan Steele all on the same mark through 18 holes, along with Englishman Justin Rose and Germany's 2010 US PGA winner Martin Kaymer. France's Mike Lorenzo-Vera also had a 66.

Australian Day, the 2015 champion, could not be matched though, with five birdies and no dropped shots setting the standard.

Rory McIlroy, the 2012 and 2014 US PGA winner, was grouped with Woods and world number one Justin Thomas, who won this tournament three years ago. McIlroy had a level-par 70 and Thomas a frustrating one-over 71.

Tiger Woods made a flying start but two-time defending champion Brooks Koepka dropped an early shot as the US PGA Championship got under way on Thursday.

Golf's first major championship of the disrupted 2020 season was in its early stages at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco, and Woods, Rory McIlroy and Justin Thomas were in a star-studded group among the early starters.

The Woods-McIlroy-Thomas group got going at 08:33 local time (16:33 BST), beginning on the back nine, and all three made birdies at their opening hole, the par-five 10th.

Koepka went out at 08:11 local time, also starting at the 10th, and was joined by a pair of reigning major champions in US Open winner Gary Woodland and Open Championship victor Shane Lowry.

Winner of this tournament in 2018 and 2019, Koepka found rough to the right of the green at the par-three 11th, going on to miss from inside seven feet for par.

His par attempt lipped out, leaving a short bogey putt.

Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose and Dustin Johnson formed another eye-catching group, with the former dropping an early shot while his playing partners both moved to one under par after two holes.

Tiger Woods has no concerns over his preparation for the US PGA Championship, the American superstar in a confident mood as he chases a 16th major title.

Woods has only made one competitive appearance since the PGA Tour resumed amid the coronavirus pandemic in June – the Memorial Tournament at Muirfield Village.

In his long-awaited return last month, Woods finished 15 strokes adrift of champion John Rahm in a share of 40th position, the former world number one struggling with a stiff back which has proven troublesome in recent years following surgery.

Woods is now in San Francisco for the PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park, where the four-time winner will play alongside Rory McIlroy and new number one Justin Thomas in Thursday's opening round behind closed doors due to COVID-19.

And the 44-year-old Woods shrugged off the lack of spectators for the first major of 2020, telling reporters: "As far as the focus part of it, I haven't had a problem with that. Those four [Memorial] rounds, I was pretty into it.

"It's different than most of the times when you go from green-to-tee, people yelling or trying to touch you. That part is different. As far as energy while I'm competing and playing, no that's the same. I'm pretty intense when I play and pretty into what I'm doing.

"I don't know if anyone in our generation has ever played without fans in a major championship. It's going to be very different. But it's still a major championship. It's still the best players in the world. We all understand that going into it, so there’s going to be plenty of energy from the competitive side."

Woods added: "I feel good. Obviously I haven't played much competitively, but I've been playing a lot at home. So I've been getting plenty of reps that way … the results that I've seen at home, very enthusiastic about some of the changes I've made and so that's been positive.

"Just trying to get my way back into this part of the season. This is what I've been gearing up for. We've got a lot of big events starting from here, so looking forward to it. This is going to be a fun test for all of us. The rough is up. Fairways are much narrower than they were here in 2009."

Brooks Koepka will start his bid for a PGA Championship three-peat alongside fellow American Gary Woodland and Irishman Shane Lowry at 08:11 (local time), 22 minutes before Woods is scheduled to tee off.

Dethroned world number one Rahm, 2005 champion Phil Mickelson and Sergio Garcia have been grouped together and will get their campaigns underway at 13:58 (local time), while Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose and Dustin Johnson are another notable group.

Sometimes in golf, you just have to hold your hands up and accept you were beaten by the better player. That is a feeling that was once all too familiar for Tiger Woods' rivals.

That was certainly the case 20 years ago at golf's most iconic venue St Andrews, which was tamed by Woods in awe-inspiring fashion en route to the first of three triumphs at The Open.

A winning score of 19 under par, eight clear of the chasing pack, underpinned the brilliance of Woods and the chasm in quality to the rest of the field in that period in the sport's illustrious history.

We take a trip down memory lane to reminisce about Woods' first feel of the Claret Jug.


HOW IT UNFOLDED

There were 22 birdies and only three bogeys over four days of near flawless golf, while Woods did not once find any of the 128 treacherous St Andrews bunkers – a staggering achievement even in benign conditions.

By the end of round one, it was Ernie Els who led the way, one stroke ahead of Woods and Steve Flesch, providing hope of a duel between two of the game's greats.

Such a notion was completely obliterated on Friday. As Els stagnated, Woods moved three ahead of the field with a glorious 66. At the end of Saturday's moving day, that advantage had doubled to six strokes.

There was the briefest of challenges from David Duval on Sunday, an electric start seeing him birdie four of the opening seven holes to get within three – as close as anyone would get to Woods. 

Duval made a cringe-inducing eight at the 17th, needing four attempts to finally get out of the Road Hole Bunker, as Els and Thomas Bjorn were left in a tie for second, a distant eight strokes back.

For Woods, the unerring way he won his first Claret Jug would leave his rivals scratching their heads at how to compete with, let alone defeat, this winning machine.


WHAT HE SAID

"It is really hard to put into words the emotions and feelings going through me and the thoughts that are running through my head," Woods said at the time.

"To have an opportunity to complete the slam at St Andrews where golf all started makes it even more special.

"I've been fortunate to have my game peak at the right times. I've always said you'd like to have your game peak at four different times a year, but to actually have it happen is a different story.

"So far I've had a wonderful, wonderful young career and hopefully I can continue the success I have. If I don't that's fine too.

"I am going to keep working on my game, keep trying to get better and we will see what happens."


THE NOTABLE FACTS

- Woods' 19-under-par score was a record for any major at the time. Henrik Stenson would record a -20 at Royal Troon in 2016, while Jason Day had also set that benchmark score at the 2015 US PGA Championship.

- His winning margin was the largest in The Open since JH Taylor won by eight in 1913.

- Woods became just the third Open champion after Greg Norman and Nick Price to shoot four rounds under 70.

- At the age of 24, Woods joined Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus in winning all four majors and completing golf's Grand Slam. He is the youngest player to have done so.


AN UNTHINKABLE 2000

The millennium bug may never have come to fruition, but Woods' performances in the 2000 majors had the look of a computer game glitch such was his utter dominance.

Vijay Singhfinished the first major of the new century with a slick green jacket at the Masters in April, but Woods completely took apart the field at Pebble Beach to win the U.S. Open a couple of months later.

There were no three-putts on the course's famous glassy greens and Woods alone finished in the red…at 12 under par! Miguel Angel Jimenez and Els, his nearest "rivals", were three over.

The 15-stroke margin of victory remains the biggest in major history and was followed by his astounding weekend at St Andrews a month later.

At the US PGA Championship, it was not quite as straightforward as the unheralded Bob May matched his score of 18 under, but Woods was not to be denied in the play-off.

By the start of next year, Woods was champion at Augusta to become the first player to be in possession of all four majors at the same time.

Tiger Woods took positives from his long-awaited PGA Tour return at the Memorial Tournament, while the 15-time major champion did not give much away regarding his plans ahead of the US PGA Championship.

Woods carded a four-over 76 as he stumbled to a share of 40th position at Muirfield Village, where he finished 15 strokes adrift of champion Jon Rahm on Sunday.

Former world number one Woods was in action on Tour for the first time since February, barely making it to the weekend in Dublin, Ohio after struggling with a stiff back on Friday.

Woods – a five-time Memorial winner – closed his first tournament back with a double bogey, five bogeys and three birdies to be six over after 72 holes.

"I competed and played again," the 44-year-old American superstar said afterwards. "It's been a while. It was nice to get my feet wet and compete and play again.

"Tough, tough conditions to start out my first week back. But it was good to get the feel and the flow of competing again."

"As far as my swing, it felt good," he said. "I was able to hit good shots. Friday was a bit off physically, but overall for my first week back, it was a lot, a lot of positives."

Woods added: "I didn't feel comfortable playing break. I've been in Florida playing Bermuda [grass greens] and seeing minimal break, come out here and playing 10, 12 feet of break was a bit different and something I'm going to have to get used to."

The US PGA Championship will take place at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco, starting August 6, after the coronavirus pandemic forced the major to be moved from May.

Asked whether he needed "more reps" before heading to San Francisco, four-time PGA Championship winner Woods replied: "Competitive reps or more reps? More reps, yes. I definitely need more reps."

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.