Day one of Bryson DeChambeau's driving assault on Augusta did not go exactly to plan.

All eyes were on the U.S. Open champion as he teed off from the 10th on Thursday as the favourite to win this year’s Masters, armed with an attack plan that had been the source of much discussion.

Would the PGA Tour's longest driver, as he suggested, look for the 14th fairway from the 13th tee? Could he possibly even drive the green from the first? Nick Faldo promised to run naked through the iconic course if the latter came to pass.

There was no doubting DeChambeau's ambition in the opening round, but the aggressive approach initially appeared flawed and his improved putting had to come to the rescue on more than one occasion.

DeChambeau met his match early, scrambling to make par at the 11th and 14th after frequenting the trees but double-bogeying the 13th.

The tide steadily turned, however, with DeChambeau still relying on a series of hefty tee shots, even if his drive at the first pulled left and allowed Faldo, in attendance as a CBS analyst, to keep his clothes on.

It was a tumultuous round for the most part and yet, by the time he returned to the clubhouse, the 27-year-old had a two-under 70, still very much in contention.

"I'm very happy with the patience I delivered to the course today," DeChambeau said.

"I tried to take on some risk. It didn't work out as well as I thought it would have, but I'm proud of the way I handled myself and finished off.

"Birdieing eight and nine was a testament to my focus level and wanting to contend here."

Of his double-bogey setback, he added: "I just didn't draw it around the corner enough and I got greedy.

"This golf course, as much as I'm trying to attack it, it can bite back. It's still Augusta National and it's the Masters. It's an amazing test of golf no matter what way you play it."

Not among those past champions but leading the way early on was Paul Casey, a bogey-free round boosted by an eagle at the second to finish on 65.

Casey finished in a tie for second at the US PGA Championship and suggested playing majors during the coronavirus pandemic is easier than a standard tournament.

"I didn't know how this was going to be, playing in a pandemic without fans," he told Sky Sports. "To be honest, I still don't like it, I miss the energy.

"But the majors we've played – Harding Park, Winged Foot, now Augusta – you can sense there's a buzz among the players. It's been that difference that has led to my good golf in the bigger championships.

"I want people to be pouring through the gates and enjoying watching myself and others play golf. But until that happens, I'm trying to make the most of it this week."

Tiger Woods, the defending champion, might yet have his say. He too finished flawless on 68 after birdies at the 13th, 15th, 16th and first.

Tiger Woods made a promising start to the defence of his title and Paul Casey took an early lead in The Masters on Thursday

Woods sensationally won a 15th major title at Augusta last year and the legendary American was just two shots off the lead through 10 holes in his first round.

The 44-year-old birdied the 13th, 15th and 16th after starting on the back nine and moved to four under with another gain at the first after play was suspended for almost three hours due to heavy rain in Georgia.

Casey jumped to the top of the leaderboard on six under with an eagle three at the second, the Englishman's 11th hole of his opening round.

He set that up with a magnificent booming drive off the tee, sending his second shot to around four feet of the hole and then making no mistake with the putter.

Four birdies in his opening seven holes on the back nine had left Casey well poised early on before he replaced Webb Simpson as the leader.

Simpson was five under through 14 holes, while Lee Westwood, Jon Rahm and Louis Oosthuizen were just a further stroke back alongside Woods.

Rahm dropped shots at two of his first three holes but made an impressive recovery, while tournament favourite Bryson DeChambeau - playing in the same group as the Spaniard - was one under having similarly rallied after double-bogeying the 13th.

Rory McIlroy and Brooks Koepka are among the big names due to go out later in the day and facing the prospect of having to return on Friday to complete their first rounds due to the miserable morning weather.

Tiger Woods is taking part in the Masters with the intention of retaining his title and will use the likes of Jack Nicklaus, Fred Couples and Bernhard Langer as inspiration.

Woods produced a remarkable display to end an 11-year wait for his 15th major title in last year's event at Augusta National.

He also won the Zozo Championship in October 2019 but has since struggled for form, finishing in a tie for 37th at the US PGA Championship and missing the cut at the U.S. Open.

Now just a month shy of his 45th birthday, Woods is not giving up on matching Nicklaus' record six Masters victories and will aim to use his advancing years to his benefit.

"Do I expect to contend? Yes, I do," he said at a pre-tournament news conference on Tuesday.

"You look at Freddie and Bernhard - they are in their 60s and they seem to contend. Jack contended here when he was, what, 58?

"It can be done. This is a golf course in which having an understanding of how to play and where to miss it and how to hit the shots, it helps.

"The golf course keeps getting longer, and it gets a little bit more difficult as I've got older and I don't quite hit it as far.

"When I first came here it was a lot of drivers and a lot of wedges. Now it's different and I'm hitting longer clubs into the holes but understanding how to play it definitely helps.

"That's one of the reasons why you see past champions, like I mentioned Freddie and Bernhard, to be able to contend so late in their careers, and hopefully I'll be one of those."

Woods has been grouped with Open champion Shane Lowry and U.S Amateur Championship winner Andy Ogletree for the first two rounds of his Masters defence.

Pre-tournament favourite Bryson DeChambeau will play alongside Louis Oosthuizen and Jon Rahm, who produced a remarkable hole-in-one in a practice session on Tuesday.

DeChambeau's incredible driving length is a hot topic of debate ahead of the rescheduled event and Woods was full of praise for the big-hitter.

"Bryson has put in the time, he has put in the work," Woods said. "What he's done in the gym has been incredible.

"What he's done on the range and what he's done with his entire team to be able to optimise that one club [driver] and transform his game and the ability to hit the ball as far as he has and in as short a span as he has, it's never been done before.

"I had speed in '97, I hit it far. As I got bigger and I filled out and tried to get stronger, it was to not hit the ball further. It was to be more consistent and to be able to practice longer.

"What Bryson has done has been absolutely incredible, and we have all been amazed at what he's been able to do in such a short span of time. It's never been done before."

DeChambeau is toying with using a 48-inch driver this week but accepts his chances of repeating his U.S. Open success at Augusta will not be solely down to how far he can hit the ball.

"I am not 100 per cent sure if I will put it in play yet because of the unknown, with it being so close to the Masters," he said.

"But if it is an improvement on every facet of launch conditions, then I don't see why not?

"I can hit it as far as I want to, but it comes down to putting and chipping. That is one of the things I think sometimes people struggle to see.

"If I don't putt it well at the U.S. Open, don't wedge it well, don't hit my irons close, I don't win that tournament."

Tiger Woods has been grouped with Shane Lowry and Andy Ogletree for the start of his Masters defence.

Fifteen-time major champion Woods will play with Open champion Lowry and, as is tradition at Augusta, the U.S. Amateur Championship winner Ogletree for the first two rounds.

The threesome will start from the 10th hole in the Thursday morning session and from the first tee on Friday in the second session.

Due to the tournament being rescheduled to November amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Masters is using a two-tee start with 11-minute intervals over the first two days to counter the reduced daylight.

Woods, 44, will be defending his title 19 months after his famous 2019 triumph.

U.S. Open champion and pre-tournament Masters favourite Bryson DeChambeau is another early starter as he plays alongside Jon Rahm and Louis Oosthuizen.

World number one Dustin Johnson will have Rory McIlroy and Patrick Cantlay for company in another impressive grouping when they begin from the first tee in the afternoon.

Other later starters include US PGA Championship winner Collin Morikawa, Adam Scott and Tyrrell Hatton, who has been tipped as a contender.

Two of the other top challengers, Brooks Koepka and Justin Thomas, are joined by Matt Fitzpatrick in another featured group.

The field has been reduced to 92 players after former winner Sergio Garcia, who tested positive for coronavirus, was one of four withdrawals.

Tiger Woods' competition at the Masters this year is too fierce for the defending champion to "flip a switch" and return to contention, according to Nick Faldo.

Woods ended an 11-year wait for his 15th major as he triumphed at Augusta last April.

The 44-year-old subsequently won the ZOZO Championship in October 2019 but has since struggled for form.

Battling back problems, Woods finished in a tie for 37th at this year's US PGA Championship and missed the cut at the 2020 U.S. Open.

Faldo, a three-time Masters champion, does not expect last year's Augusta winner to suddenly rediscover his best form this week.

"Unfortunately, things are just more difficult for Tiger," he said. "He's a little bit older and the back hasn't been good.

"His back rules his everything - golf and life, probably. It rules his practice - that's very important. He cannot stand and hit putts like he used to, he can't put the work in.

"He certainly hasn't put the competitive reps in and he hasn't had the results. Everything is a challenge this week, the weather conditions, a physical walk.

"The bottom line is it's an extremely difficult test for Tiger this week to rekindle that amazing magic from last year.

"Can you flip a switch and say, 'I'll just have the greatest emotional week of possibly my career', showing his children he could still be a champion?

"I don't believe he could flip the switch on that. There's too many good players. There's 10 guys or more who are very long hitters, which is going to be key."

That brought Faldo onto Bryson DeChambeau, the longest driver on the PGA Tour, who was joint-fourth at the US PGA and won the U.S. Open, his first major success.

DeChambeau is among the favourites for the Masters and Faldo said: "He is a completely different animal, literally right now. He's spearheading the whole distance debate.

"But I'm a fan of his. He's done it physically and he's applied the science."

Faldo is less optimistic of Rory McIlroy's chances of finally ending his wait for a career grand slam at Augusta, where there will be no patrons.

The absence of spectators this year amid the coronavirus pandemic has coincided with a tough run of form for McIlroy.

"Rory seems like he's been one of the players who's suffered from a lack of atmosphere," Faldo said. "Rory feeds off that.

"He hasn't played his best, hasn't managed to get completely on a fantastic run."

Three-time Masters champion Nick Faldo believes playing Augusta this week will be no easier for the absence of patrons but the winning feeling on Sunday will be dampened.

A unique November Masters begins without spectators on Thursday, with the tournament moved from its usual April date due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Faldo, who won at Augusta in 1989, 1990 and 1996, believes the players will suffer as a result of fans being kept away.

And the six-time major winner foresees an awkward celebration for this year's victor, completely out of keeping with the scenes in 2019 as Tiger Woods ended an 11-year wait for one of golf's top prizes.

"It's going to be very different," Faldo said. "You're going to celebrate winning by turning, looking at your caddy and just giving a whatever, half high-five.

"There won't be any adrenaline like Tiger showed last year.

"It's probably quite sad for some guys. You win a tournament and go, 'Hi, thanks', and you get a little golf clap. It will hurt a little bit, because it's just not the same.

"The famous walk, coming up the 18th; I can promise you, the goosebumps. It's all unfortunately going to be less, it has to be less. It's one of the most wonderful walks coming down the 18th at a major to win.

"The Masters is so special because the whole green is engulfed with patrons, the famous scoreboards. It's all going to be very quiet.

"The good thing is there will still be a green jacket waiting at Butler Cabin. It will feel good by then, but it has to feel very different on the golf course."

Predicting the empty course could get under the skin of some players, Faldo added: "To play the Masters without even having any patron ropes lining any of the fairways is going to be a pretty weird feeling, a weird look.

"It's just you, just the golfers, so I think, in a way, it can actually increase the intensity or the pressure. It's just you coping with everything.

"Some players are [usually] able to reflect their emotion with the fans, with the patrons, a smile, a wink, a funny face, a reaction off a good shot, a great shot, a poor shot.

"Now it's all down to you, you and your caddy. That could wind some of them up as well.

"With no patrons around, people think it's easier. But at the Masters, playing the second nine for a green jacket, it will still have incredible intensity. Just you and your caddy.

"You'll probably be able to hear your own heartbeat, you'll certainly be able to feel it. It will be so silent, just you dealing with everything."

Lee Elder will join Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player as an honorary starter at the Masters in 2021, 46 years on from becoming the iconic tournament's first black player.

Already a regular at the U.S. Open and PGA Championship for around a decade, Elder made his Augusta bow in 1975.

Although the Texan missed the cut, he qualified for the Masters six times in total and finished in a tie for 17th in 1979.

Recognising Elder's breakthrough appearance, Augusta chairman Fred Ridley revealed on Monday scholarships would be established in the player's name and he would accompany Nicklaus and Player to the first tee at the 85th Masters in April.

"The opportunity to earn an invitation to the Masters and stand at that first tee was my dream," Elder said.

"To have it come true in 1975 remains one of the greatest highlights of my career and life.

"So to be invited back to the first tee one more time to join Jack and Gary for next year's Masters means the world to me.

"It also gives me great pride to know that my first Masters appearance continues to make a positive impact on others."

The 2020 Masters belatedly gets under way this week without spectators at Augusta. The tournament was delayed from its usual April date due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Ridley explained Augusta wanted to honour Elder at the 2021 event rather than a uniquely subdued tournament this year.

Tiger Woods wrote on Twitter: "We all belong. Such wonderful news to hear from Augusta National in celebration of Lee Elder."

Patrick Cantlay upstaged Justin Thomas and Jon Rahm to win the Zozo Championship on Sunday.

Cantlay claimed his third PGA Tour victory after shooting a seven-under 65 in the final round at Sherwood Country Club in California.

The American produced a fine performance on Sunday, mixing nine birdies – tying his career-best in a round on the PGA Tour – with two bogeys.

Cantlay made four birdies in a five-hole stretch beginning at the 11th, including producing a wonderful tee shot at the par-three 15th.

"I've been playing really well I feel like the last little stretch, I just haven't put it together four days in a row and this week it was different," he told NBC after his first win of 2020.

"I played really well in Vegas so I tried to take the first week in Vegas [at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open], just try to take as much as I could from those first three days.

"It was nice to get off to a good start today and I played really well."

Thomas, who held the overnight lead, and Rahm finished tied for second a shot behind Cantlay.

Rahm (68) pushed to force a play-off but missed a 19-footer for birdie at the last, while Thomas carded a 69.

Russell Henley (66), Cameron Smith (67), Bubba Watson (68) and Ryan Palmer (69) finished tied for fourth at 19 under.

Rory McIlroy continued his good finish with a six-under 66 in the final round.

The Northern Irishman fired rounds of 67, 67 and 66 to finish the tournament, left to lament his opening 73 as he ended up tied for 17th.

McIlroy finished with 29 birdies during the tournament, which is his career-high on the PGA Tour.

Tiger Woods, the defending champion and 15-time major winner, struggled, a two-over 74 seeing him finish at one under and tied for 72nd.

Justin Thomas retained his lead at the Zozo Championship as Jon Rahm surged into contention on Saturday.

After back-to-back 65s at Sherwood Country Club in California, Thomas carded a five-under 67 in the third round.

The American mixed six birdies with just one bogey to get to 19 under and retain his one-stroke lead.

Thomas, a 13-time winner on the PGA Tour, is set for a final-round battle with Rahm.

Rahm charged into outright second thanks to a nine-under 63.

The Spanish world number two capitalised on a fast start, making a 17-footer for eagle at the par-five second hole.

Rahm went bogey-free in his round, which also included seven birdies, to be in contention for a sixth PGA Tour victory.

Of his previous five wins, two have come in the state of California – at the 2017 Farmers Insurance Open and 2018 CareerBuilder Challenge.

Lanto Griffin continued his consistent showing with a four-under 68 that moved him into 17 under and outright third.

Sebastian Munoz (66), Ryan Palmer (66) and Patrick Cantlay (68) are a shot further back.

A group of six players – Webb Simpson (67), Brian Harman (67), Matt Fitzpatrick (67), Bubba Watson (68), Scottie Scheffler (69) and Dylan Frittelli (70) – are at 15 under.

After bouncing back in the second round, Tiger Woods battled in the third, the 15-time major winner and defending champion shooting a 71 to be back at three under.

Rory McIlroy, meanwhile, continued to climb the leaderboard, a 67 lifting him into nine under and a tie for 36th.

Justin Thomas fired another seven-under 65 to grab a one-stroke lead at the halfway mark of the Zozo Championship on Friday.

The American produced a bogey-free second round at Sherwood Country Club in California to move into 14 under.

Thomas, the 2017 US PGA Championship winner, made five birdies on the back nine – his first nine holes – before a solid finish.

The world number three, Thomas has enjoyed a fine year, including winning twice. He has multiple wins in every year since 2017.

Back-to-back 65s have given Thomas a one-stroke lead over Dylan Frittelli and Lanto Griffin, while Patrick Cantlay and Scottie Scheffler are a stroke further back after all four also shot 65s.

The round of the day belonged to Richy Werenski, who broke Tiger Woods' course record with a stunning 11-under 61.

Werenski birdied nine of his first 12 holes after starting his round at the 10th and he picked up another shot at the fifth to put him on track to break 60.

However, a bogey at the par-four sixth hurt his chances, although he responded with birdies at seven and nine to get to 11 under and a tie for sixth.

Abraham Ancer (66), Harris English (67), Bubba Watson (63), Tyrrell Hatton (68), Patrick Reed (63), Tony Finau (64) and Kevin Kisner (67) are all alongside Werenski.

Woods, in action for the first time since the U.S. Open, bounced back from his opening-round 76 with a six-under 66.

Despite his improvement, the defending champion and 15-time major winner is well back at two under to be tied for 66th.

It was a similar story for Rory McIlroy, who carded a 67 to get to four under, although the Northern Irishman is 10 strokes behind Thomas.

Overnight leader Sebastian Munoz dropped back into a tie for 14th after carding a two-under 70.

Sebastian Munoz set the early pace at the Zozo Championship after earning a one-stroke lead in the opening round, while defending champion Tiger Woods struggled on his return to the PGA Tour.

Colombian golfer Munoz carded an eight-under-par 64 to top the leaderboard in Thousand Oaks, where the tournament is taking place after being relocated from Japan due to the coronavirus pandemic and travel restrictions.

Munoz – eyeing his second Tour title – holed two eagles, eight birdies, a double bogey and two bogeys at Sherwood Country Club.

The 27-year-old recorded his second eagle of the day on the par-five 16th, holing out from 51 yards to mark the third instance in his Tour career with two eagles in a single round.

England's Tyrrell Hatton and American star Justin Thomas – who ended the day eagle-birdie-birdie – are a shot off the pace heading into Friday's second round, while Brian Harman, Lanto Griffin, Kevin Kisner, Harris English and Dylan Frittelli are stroke further back at six under.

World number two Jon Rahm and Jason Day were among the players to post first-round 68s in a field missing top-ranked golfer Dustin Johnson and Adam Scott due to positive coronavirus cases.

After claiming his maiden Tour title via last week's CJ Cup at Shadow Creek, Jason Kokrak shot a three-under-par 69 to be tied for 26th alongside the likes of Xander Schauffele and Matthew Wolff.

Searching for his first victory since 2017, former world number one Jordan Spieth opened with a 70, just like 2018 Masters champion Patrick Reed.

Rory McIlroy – a four-time major champion – recorded a one-over-par 73, a shot worse off than Phil Mickelson.

As for Woods, his title defence and bid for a record-breaking 83rd Tour crown started with a forgettable four-over-par 76 that left him 12 strokes behind Munoz.

Making just his eighth start of 2020 and playing for the first time since missing the U.S. Open cut ahead of next month's Masters defence, Woods played three par-five holes over par in the same round for the first time in his illustrious career.

Woods carded a three-over 39 on the back nine, which included a double bogey and two bogeys to go with a solitary birdie.

Tiger Woods' Hero World Challenge has been cancelled as a result of travel restrictions related to the coronavirus pandemic.

The event in the Bahamas, hosted by 15-time major winner Woods, was set to take place in December but it was called off on Monday.

It means there will be no opportunity for Henrik Stenson to defend his title in Albany, where a star-studded field of 18 players had been scheduled to compete.

"Given the current global restrictions and ongoing developments resulting from COVID-19, the 2020 Hero World Challenge will not be played this year," read a statement from tournament organisers.

"This decision was made with the health and wellbeing of all tournament constituents and the Albany community in mind.

"We look forward to hosting 18 of the top players in the world and welcoming tournament guests to Albany, Bahamas next year."

Bryson DeChambeau said it was special to join elite company in Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus with his U.S. Open victory.

DeChambeau pulled away for his first major success, winning by six strokes at Winged Foot in New York.

The American, 27, carded a three-under 67 in the final round on Sunday and was the only player to finish under par.

DeChambeau joined Woods and Nicklaus as the only players to win the U.S. Amateur, U.S. Open and an individual title at the NCAA Division I Men's Golf Championship, and it was company the winner was delighted to join.

"It's just an honour. I don't know what else to say. It's been a lot of hard work," he said.

"Mr Nicklaus has been always awesome to me. He gave me a sponsor's invite. Tiger has always been great to me. I can't say thank you enough to them for them helping me push me along to be a better person and a better golfer, as well.

"But to be in the likes of the names of that company is special. I'll forever appreciate that."

As overnight leader Matthew Wolff fell away in the final round, DeChambeau mixed an eagle with two birdies and a bogey.

The pair traded eagles at the ninth and DeChambeau said his 39-foot putt led to him thinking about lifting the trophy.

"It's kind of interesting, on nine is when I first thought, 'Okay, this could be reality'," he said.

"I made that eagle, long eagle putt and I shocked myself by making it, too, and I thought to myself, I could do it. And then immediately after, I said, 'Nope, you've got to focus on each and every hole', and I just kept throughout the course of the back nine telling myself, 'Nope, we've got three more holes, we've got four more holes, we've got five more holes', whatever it was.

"I just had to keep focused, making sure I was executing every shot to the best I possibly could."

Tiger Woods said he will take a break before preparing to defend his Zozo Championship and Masters titles after missing the cut at the U.S. Open on Friday.

Woods endured a disappointing and frustrating outing in New York, where the 15-time major champion failed to qualify for the weekend following a seven-over-par 77.

A three-time U.S. Open champion, Woods finished with a score of 10 over at the unforgiving Winged Foot Golf Club, having holed two double bogeys and five bogeys on day two, while Patrick Reed tops the leaderboard at four under.

"It's frustrating that I'm not going to be here for the weekend," Woods said as defending champion Gary Woodland, Jordan Spieth and Phil Mickelson also missed the cut.

"It feels like the way the golf course is changing, anybody who makes the cut has the opportunity to win this championship. I didn't get myself that opportunity.

"It's never easy to not be playing for the championship on the weekend. The whole goal of entering an event is to win, and when I don't give myself that opportunity over the weekend, it doesn't feel good."

"Physically it was frustrating that I didn't drive the ball as well as I needed to," added the 44-year-old. "Iron play was pretty much the way it has been. It's been good, and I finally putted well. But on this golf course it's imperative that you hit fairways, and I did not do that."

Woods is now eyeing some recovery ahead of the Zozo Championship and rescheduled Masters.

The American superstar secured a record-equalling 82nd PGA Tour crown after winning last year's Zozo Championship, and he will have the chance to move clear in the history books when the tournament starts on October 22.

Woods will then try to claim back-to-back Masters trophies at Augusta, beginning November 12.

"Probably I'm not going to be swinging a club for a little bit," he said. "Well, until Tuesday. And then after that, take a little break. And then refocus and get back after it.

"There's still one more major to go, and my title defence at Sherwood. We have a couple big, big things ahead of us."

Patrick Reed is the man to beat at the halfway mark of the U.S. Open after earning a one-shot lead in his pursuit of a second major title, while Tiger Woods was among the big names who failed to qualify for the weekend.

Reed – the 2018 Masters champion – carded an even-par-70 to move top of the leaderboard through two rounds in tricky conditions at Winged Foot Golf Club on Friday.

American golfer Reed was a stroke behind overnight leader and countryman Justin Thomas heading into day two in New York, where the rescheduled major is taking place behind closed doors amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Reed, who made a memorable hole-in-one in the opening round, replaced Thomas atop the standings thanks to a mixed day, which included five birdies and as many bogeys.

A controversial figure on the PGA Tour following accusations of cheating during last year's Hero World Challenge, Reed started on the back nine and birdied his second hole but had three bogeys in a five-hole stretch – that also included another birdie – approaching the turn.

Reed tallied two birdies and two bogeys before closing his round with a birdie at the last to end the day four under and ahead of surging American Bryson DeChambeau (68), who improved 12 positions.

Rafa Cabrera Bello (70), Harris English (70) and former world number one Thomas (73) are tied for third and two shots off the pace heading into Saturday's third round.

Thomas set the record for the lowest score posted in a U.S. Open at Winged Foot with a first-round 65, but he was unable to repeat the feat on a tough day.

Jon Rahm (72) closed the round one over through 36 holes, while world number one and FedEx Cup champion Dustin Johnson (70) is two strokes worse off following back-to-back rounds in the 70s.

Johnson – the 2016 winner – is three over alongside four-time major champion Rory McIlroy, who endured a forgettable round following a six-over-par 76.

In contention after round one, Northern Irish star McIlroy – seeking his first major trophy since 2014 – fell 17 positions on the back of a double bogey, seven bogeys and just three birdies.

As for Woods, he missed the cut and the 15-time major winner was not alone as defending champion Gary Woodland (74), Jordan Spieth (81) and Phil Mickelson (74) also fell short of the six-over line.

Three-time U.S. Open champion Woods finished with a score of 10 over after shooting a second-round 77, which included two double bogeys and five bogeys.

It was a horrible day for 2015 champion Spieth, whose woes continued as he bowed out at 14 over after going through the second round without a birdie, instead holding a double bogey and nine bogeys.

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