Tiger Woods is no stranger to comebacks.

Between 2014 and 2017, when an injury-plagued Woods was barely able to compete at the highest level, let alone seriously contend for honours, there were plenty of compelling storylines in golf's major championships.

Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth each won two in succession to suggest a glorious new rivalry was in prospect, while the latter sensationally threw away the Masters in 2016 before producing a remarkable recovery to win the following year's Open. In addition, there were two truly memorable final-day duels, Henrik Stenson edging out Phil Mickelson to win the 2016 Open Championship and Sergio Garcia pipping Justin Rose at Augusta nine months later.

By the time Garcia finally earned major glory at the 74th attempt, it was becoming easy to view Woods' career as a top-level player in the past tense. 

Little more than a month later, the former world number one was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence in Florida, following an unexpected reaction to prescription medicine, and a humiliating mugshot of Woods made headlines around the world.

In light of that embarrassing episode and Woods' continued back problems, it was truly incredible to see a resurgent Tiger threaten to win two majors in 2018 before he then ended a five-year victory drought at the Tour Championship.

Yet it turned out the best was still to come. And there can be no doubt that the events of April 14, 2019 at Augusta comfortably trump all of the aforementioned major narratives. If golf was good in Woods' absence, it got a whole lot better when he returned, and the world will hope he has another comeback in him after Tuesday's car accident in Los Angeles.

In winning the Masters for a fifth time, Woods not only added the most remarkable chapter to his stunning career, but he once again proved he is the one athlete who moves the needle like no other.

While the likes of Roger Federer, Serena Williams, Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi, Tom Brady, and LeBron James are all rightly recognised as masters of their respective crafts, none of those superstars can match Woods when it comes to the impact they have on their sport.

When Woods is successful, interest in golf is taken to a whole new level, for one simple reason.

As Williams herself tweeted at the time of his Masters triumph, to watch his success was to witness "greatness like no other".

It is essentially impossible to quantify whether Messi is better than Federer, or whether Serena is superior to James, given they are competing in different fields.

Yet it is hard to envisage any active sportsperson commanding more attention than a successful Woods. More than a decade after his period of outrageous dominance in golf ended, he once again reprised his role as sport's most captivating figure, one who somehow regained a majestic aura after it appeared he was a busted flush.

When he secured victory at the 2019 Masters, it felt like the whole world was watching, and doubtless they are watching now – hoping for another miracle comeback.

Tiger Woods was taken to hospital with "multiple leg injuries" sustained in a car crash in Los Angeles on Tuesday.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Woods was the sole occupant of a vehicle which rolled over on the border of Rolling Hills Estates and Rancho Palos Verdes.

Mark Steinberg – the 15-time major champion's agent – confirmed Woods underwent surgery following the accident.

Woods was already recovering from his latest back surgery ahead of April's Masters, a long-standing issue requiring five procedures in recent years.

The 45-year-old American superstar has enjoyed a remarkable career, winning 82 PGA Tour titles among other honours.

Stats Perform News looks at Woods' greatest moments.


Mastering Augusta

Having turned professional a year earlier, Woods – an already prodigious talent – earned the first of his major titles in sensational fashion at the Masters in 1997.

A record low score of 270 (later matched by Jordan Spieth), the biggest margin of victory at Augusta (12 shots) and the youngest Masters champion. Not bad going for a 21-year-old.


Gutsing it out against Garcia

Two years on and along came another player tipped for golfing superstardom in Sergio Garcia.

A 19-year-old Garcia, who started the final round of the US PGA Championship two shots adrift of Woods and Mike Weir, threatened to derail his rival's hopes of a second major by moving into a one-shot lead.

But Woods, not for the first time, pulled out all the stops – including a stunning escape from behind a tree en route to glory at Medinah.


Making history at Pebble Beach

By 2000, Woods' star was approaching its zenith and at that year's U.S. Open he produced the most dominant performance in major history.

Not only was his 15-stroke margin of victory the largest ever in one of golf's premier strokeplay events, he was the only player that weekend at Pebble Beach to finish under par.


Grand Slam complete

Just a month later and Woods was in dominant form again as he triumphed by eight shots to win The Open at St Andrews.

Of even more significance, the victory saw Woods become the fifth player to achieve the career Grand Slam and, at the age of 24, he was the youngest to do so.


Completing the 'Tiger Slam'

The accolades just kept on rolling and, by the following March, Woods achieved something no other player has done before or since.

By winning the Masters, Woods was in possession of all four major titles. As he did not do so in the same year, it was not recognised as a single-season Grand Slam, thus it became dubbed the 'Tiger Slam'.


That shot at Augusta

By going almost three years without winning one of golf's big four, Woods, by his own remarkable standards, suffered something of a drought during the mid-noughties.

But that changed at a dramatic 2005 Masters. Starting three shots ahead of Chris DiMarco on the Sunday, Woods endured a mixed round but pulled clear with one of the greatest moments in the tournament's illustrious history.

A chip from behind the green began well left of the pin, turned at 90 degrees and rolled towards the hole. Agonisingly, the ball stopped on the edge of the cup before dropping in after what felt like a lifetime.

Woods went on to bogey the next two holes, but eventually triumphed via a play-off.


An emotional Open victory

Woods went through personal tragedy in May 2006 after his father Earl passed away. 

Following the loss of his father, Woods played a reduced schedule but held off a star-studded cast – again including DiMarco – to win by two shots at The Open.

There were tears aplenty, not just from Woods, after the most emotional of victories.


Memorable Mediate battle

The most unlikely of Woods' 15 major victories, at least until this week, came when he somehow won the 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines despite being hampered by serious injuries to his left leg.

What is more, Woods even came through a 19-hole play-off with Rocco Mediate, an incredible feat given his lack of fitness. He took the rest of the year off after prevailing.


80 not out

Many, including Woods himself, questioned if he would play again, let alone win again, as he struggled badly with a succession of back injuries in recent years.

Yet you can never write off a competitor like Tiger and he ended a five-year winning drought in style at East Lake, sealing his 80th PGA Tour victory at the 2018 Tour Championship.

 

Five times a Master

If returning to the winner's circle was phenomenal enough, Woods was not finished there.

After contending at the U.S. Open and US PGA Championship in 2018, he sensationally won the Masters for a fifth time on Sunday, coming from behind for the first time in the final round of a major.

Francesco Molinari was two clear with 18 - and seven - to play, but the day belonged to Woods as he triumphed to spark jubilant celebrations.

 

Tiger matches Snead

He secured a record-equalling 82nd PGA Tour crown after winning the Zozo Championship in October 2019.

Woods sealed an historic three-stroke win to draw level with Sam Snead for the most victories on Tour.

Tiger Woods was taken to hospital with "multiple leg injuries" sustained in a vehicle collision in Los Angeles on Tuesday.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Woods was the sole occupant of a vehicle which rolled over on the border of Rolling Hills Estates and Rancho Palos Verdes.

Mark Steinberg, the 15-time major champion's agent, confirmed Woods was in surgery following the accident.

Well-wishes were swift to arrive for one of sport's true greats, who has 82 PGA Tour titles to his name across a remarkable career.

Stats Perform News has run through some of his most memorable achievements to date.

 

MAJOR WINS

Woods famously sits second in the list of men's major winners, edging to just three behind Jack Nicklaus' tally of 18 with his fifth Masters success in April 2019. After undergoing back surgery in January, he has been targeting a return to action in time to compete at Augusta again this year. Tiger has won the US PGA Championship on four occasions and boasts three successes at The Open and U.S. Open.

PGA TOUR WINS

Sam Snead long held the outright record for the most wins on the PGA Tour, but Woods moved alongside his fellow American great, who died in 2002, on 82 titles with victory at the Zozo Championship in October 2019. Snead won titles in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, landing his last win on the tour at the age of 52.

 

MOST WEEKS AT WORLD NUMBER ONE

Woods has topped the Official World Golf Ranking, which was introduced in 1986, for 683 weeks, more than double the time spent at number one by his nearest rival in this regard, Greg Norman (331 weeks). In eight years – 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 – Tiger remained atop the rankings for all 52 weeks of the year. His stint as number one between June 2005 and October 2010 – a period of 281 weeks – is another record.

 

CAREER EARNINGS ON PGA TOUR

Woods has amassed career earnings of $120,851,706 on the PGA Tour. He has earned over $28million more than his nearest rival in this regard, Phil Mickelson.

 

CONSECUTIVE CUTS

Between 1998 and 2005, Woods made the cut in 142 consecutive PGA Tour events, comfortably surpassing the previous record streak of 113 held by Byron Nelson.

 

RECORD SCORES IN MAJORS

Woods' record for the lowest 72-hole score in relation to par at The Open was taken by Henrik Stenson in 2016, the Swede's 20-under total at Royal Troon one shot better than Tiger's winning mark at St Andrews in 2000. Woods held the joint-best winning score at the Masters, having finished 18 under in 1997 - Jordan Spieth matched that effort in 2015 - until Dustin Johnson blew away the competition at Augusta in November 2020. His 20-under score set a new Masters record, and he joined Stenson and Jason Day as the only players to win a major with such a score.

 

CAREER GRAND SLAM WINNER

In addition to being one of only five men, together with Nicklaus, Ben Hogan, Gary Player and Gene Sarazen, to have won all of golf's four majors since the introduction of the Masters in 1934, Woods held all four titles at once following his 2001 triumph at Augusta, which completed the much-vaunted 'Tiger Slam'. No player has ever won the four present majors in the same year.

Tiger Woods hopes to be fit to play the Masters again this year but the 15-time major champion is not taking anything for granted following his latest back surgery.

Woods' long-standing back issue has required five procedures, most recently a microdiscectomy in December to alleviate nerve pain.

The 45-year-old has had a mixed record with managing the injury in recent years.

Woods claimed a long-awaited fifth green jacket at Augusta National in 2019 but has missed the cut at three of the six majors since then.

He now faces a race simply to enter the Masters in 2021, which begins on April 8.

"I'm feeling fine, a little stiff," Woods, a host at PGA Tour event the Genesis Invitational, told CBS on Sunday. "I've got one more MRI scheduled and then I can start doing more activities.

"I'm still in the gym doing rehab activities before gravitating towards more."

Woods was asked specifically about appearing at Augusta but, given his repeated problems with his back, he appears unwilling to take any risks.

"God, I hope so," he said of playing. "But I've got to get there first. I don't have much wiggle room left. I've got only one back."

Woods has played only three events this season, most recently the 2020 Masters, delayed until last November due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Then the defending champion, Woods finished in a tie for 38th.

Golf superstars including Tiger Woods and defending champion Dustin Johnson are set to play in front of "limited" crowds at the Masters, it was announced on Tuesday.

Last year's tournament was delayed from April to November because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and there were no spectators allowed for that edition of the major at Augusta National.

That is set to change in 2021, says organisers, who are preparing to welcome a small number of Augusta's 'patrons' to watch the action unfold.

Full attendance was ruled out given the continuing need for social distancing, and those allowed entry must adhere to strict health protocols.

Augusta National club chairman Fred Ridley said: “Following the successful conduct of the Masters tournament last November with only essential personnel, we are confident in our ability to responsibly invite a limited number of patrons to Augusta National in April.

"As with the November Masters, we will implement practices and policies that will protect the health and safety of everyone in attendance.

"Nothing is, or will be, more important than the well-being of all involved. While we are disappointed that we will be unable to accommodate a full complement of patrons this year, we will continue our efforts to ensure that all who purchased tickets from Augusta National will have access in 2022, provided conditions improve."

The Masters is scheduled to take place at its Georgia home from April 8 to 11, with Johnson looking to follow up the stunning 20-under-par performance that saw him win a first green jacket.

That was a record score for a champion in the tournament's history and came a year after former world number one Woods landed his 15th major title when he triumphed at the Masters for a fifth time.

Cameron Smith feels he could win a couple of Masters titles if he replicates his history-making Augusta performance.

Smith became the first player in Masters history to card all four rounds in the 60s at the major tournament after going 67-68-69-69, but he still finished runner-up on Sunday.

The unheralded Australian ended the rescheduled event 15 under, level with Sung-jae Im, but still five strokes adrift of record-breaking champion Dustin Johnson in Georgia.

It was Smith's best major performance, having tied for fourth at the 2015 U.S. Open.

After achieving a first in The Masters' 84 years, Smith told reporters: "I had no idea starting today that I needed to do that. That's really cool. 

"I honestly can't believe it, but just got to put it down ‑‑ myself, just got to put it down to just scrambling and digging deep. There were a few times throughout week where I could have let it slip away, and it didn't."

Reflecting on his bittersweet display, Smith – winner of two PGA Tour titles and as many on the European Tour – added: "It would have been cool to do that and win. I was actually saying before, you know, I'd take 15‑under around here the rest of my career and I might win a couple. 

"It's just the way it is. I felt as though I didn't quite have my longest stuff, like I said, this week, but my scrambling was what kept me in it."

"I felt like I got away with a lot this week, a bit of skewwhiff shots into the green, something I might need to tidy up if we're coming back here and it's firm and fast," continued the 27-year-old, who was tied for fifth at the 2018 Masters.

"But I love the place. I want to win here really badly, and I feel like it brings the best out of my game."

Bryson DeChambeau felt like he shot 15 over after the American star failed to live up to his own hype at the Masters.

DeChambeau stormed to his maiden major success at the U.S. Open in September but was unable to replicate his Winged Foot success in Georgia this week, finishing two-under-par at Augusta, where Dustin Johnson reigned supreme.

The 27-year-old vowed to play the iconic par-72 course as if it were a par-67, yet found himself scrambling to make the cut on Saturday after opening efforts of 70 and 74.

Renowned for his huge drives off the tee, DeChambeau seemed pent up throughout the tournament, and dropped 18 shots in total, including a triple bogey on day two.

DeChambeau managed to card in the 60s on just one occasion from his four rounds, ultimately finishing tied for 34th place and 18 strokes adrift of champion Johnson on Sunday.

Reflecting on his performance, DeChambeau lamented an opportunity missed, labelling it as "one of those weeks".

"At the beginning of the week I felt like I could have a great chance to win the tournament if I just played my game," DeChambeau told a news conference. 

"Shoot, I made enough birdies this week and eagles to have a chance to win. There's no doubt about that. 

"I made way too many mistakes that I've got to talk about with my caddie and go, hey, how do we not make these mistakes anymore, how can we work better as a team to have that not happen?

"At Winged Foot we did a great job of it. This week we didn't. We didn't place it in the right places and I mis‑hit a lot of shots that usually are pretty easy for me. 

"Numerous factors that were in play, but to have all this adversity and to still finish it off somewhat decent and be under par for the week is great, even though I feel like I shot 15 over for the week, really, to be honest with you. 

"It was one of those things, one of those weeks."

DeChambeau also claimed he had been feeling slightly off-kilter during his rounds.

"I've got to fix whatever is going on up here," DeChambeau said. "I have no idea. Just dizziness. It's only when I go from down to up, so I can't even like think and talk right now.

"But that's just what happens, I go down and up and my brain gets all disoriented. I've got to fix that, and once I fix it I'll be even better than now, and when something arises in the future, I'll just keep trying to fix it.

"I'm hydrated, everything is fine. It's just about orientation. There were numerous times where I was over it and I just felt super uncomfortable. 

"I couldn't see anything. I couldn't see the line. It was really weird. I missed a lot of putts today."

Dustin Johnson admitted his emotions threatened to get the better of him as he closed in on a record-breaking win at the 2020 Masters.

The world number one claimed the famous green jacket for the first time after finishing five strokes clear on an historic 20-under-par - the first time any player has reached that mark at Augusta.

It was the 36-year-old's second major triumph and the first since his 2016 victory at the U.S. Open, but he said this was the tournament he always dreamed of winning.

As he and his caddie, younger brother Austin Johnson, closed out a final round of four under, he found it tough to keep his emotions in check as he thought ahead to receiving the iconic blazer from 2019 champion Tiger Woods.

"It's always tough to get it done in a major, no matter how good you're playing, it's hard," he said. "I was nervous all day; I could feel it. The Masters for me is the biggest, the one I wanted to win the most. I'm proud of the way I handled myself and the way I finished off the tournament.

"Honestly, it still feels like a dream. As a kid, dreaming about winning the Masters, having Tiger put the green jacket on you, it still seems like it's a dream. I'm here; what a great feeling it is. I couldn't be more excited.

"It's an unbelievable feeling, to experience that with my brother. It's a big help to have him here on my bag, I wouldn't want anyone else there. To share all these memories and moments with him is incredible. I had a jam a little bit on the 18th, he was tearing it up, it made me tear up – I still got to finish this off, I can't be crying! I'll remember this for the rest of my life.

"It's an incredible feeling. I've played unbelievable golf all week. The conditions of the course definitely helped the scoring a little bit. I played really well, today felt really difficult, the wind was very tricky. To have the scoring record, shooting 20 under is a great honour. I'm so excited, it's hard to even talk."

Woods hailed the achievement of a man he says has brought a new level of "athleticism" to golf.

"He's an amazing athlete," Woods said. "He's one of the first guys to ever bring athleticism to our sport.

"DJ has just an amazing ability to stay calm in tough moments, and in order to win this event, and we all know as past champions how hard it is, the emotions we have to deal with out there.  There's no one more suited to that, I think, than DJ."

Tiger Woods imploded in remarkable fashion on the 12th hole at Augusta on Sunday, but the five-time Masters champion was proud of his response to the setback. 

Woods – who triumphed at Augusta in 2019 – fell apart on the par-three hole at Rae's Creek during his final round, shooting a 10. 

The 15-time major winner's tee shot bounced back into the water and a wedge from the resultant drop also found the drink. 

Woods' then landed his next shot into a bunker, before his subsequent attempt out of the sand sailed over the green and back into the water for a third time. 

He regained his composure to finish with two putts, though the damage was already done as he slipped to four over par.

However, Woods hit back to shoot five birdies over his last six holes, ensuring he ended his tournament by signing for a score of 76, leaving him at one under. 

"That's part of our sport," Woods told reporters. "This sport is awfully lonely sometimes.  

"You have to fight it. No one is going to bring you off the mound or call in a sub. You have to fight through it.  

"That's what makes this game so unique and so difficult mentally. We've all been there, unfortunately. I've been there and you just have to turn around and figure out the next shot, and I was able to do that coming home."

Explaining his error-strewn effort on the 12th, Woods added: "Well, I committed to the wrong wind. 

"The wind was off the right for the first two guys, and then when I stepped up there, it switched to howling off the left, and the flag on 11 was howling off the left.  

"I didn't commit to the wind, and I also got ahead of it and pushed it, too, because I thought the wind would come more off the right and it was off the left, and that just started the problem from there. 

"From there I hit a lot more shots and had a lot more experiences there in Rae's Creek, and then this is unlike any other sport in which you're so alone out there and you have to figure it out and you have to fight and no one is going to pull you off the bump and you just have to figure it out." 

Woods finished 19 strokes behind winner Dustin Johnson, who capped a supreme performance with a fourth-round 68 to finish on 20 under, the first player to reach that number in Masters history. 

World number one Dustin Johnson rounded off a dominant week at Augusta National by claiming his maiden Masters crown.  

Johnson finished on a record-breaking 20-under for the tournament, five strokes clear of nearest rivals Cameron Smith and Sungjae Im. 

The 36-year-old took some time to relocate the imperious form he displayed during Saturday's bogey-free 65, dropping shots at four and five.  

That wobble offered a reminder that Johnson had failed to convert on the previous four occasions he had held a 54-hole lead at a major.  

However, the 2016 U.S. Open winner stormed clear on the back nine, with an immaculate wedge to six feet on 15 setting up a third consecutive birdie - a successful putt that made him the first player in Masters history to reach 20-under.

Dustin Johnson won the Masters with a score of 20-under par - the world number one becoming the first player in history to reach that mark at Augusta.

Dustin Johnson's previously commanding position at the top of the Masters leaderboard was left looking a little less dominant after his lead was cut to two at the halfway point of the final round on Sunday.

The world number one enjoyed a near flawless outing a day earlier, his seven-under-par 65 helping him to equal the 54-hole record set by Jordan Spieth in 2015 and open up a four-shot lead over Cameron Smith and Sungjae Im.

But an early wobble offered encouragement to the chasers, particularly the impressive Smith, who found himself as Johnson's closest competitor at the turn.

Having parred the first, Johnson then showed signs of unease as he scrambled to avoid dropping a shot on the par-five second.

A birdie at the third proved a false dawn of sorts as back-to-back bogeys followed.

At the same point, Im was two under for the day and seemingly closing on Johnson, only for the South Korean's bogey at the sixth to set him back.

However, at the halfway point it was Smith – a Masters debutant, like Im – who appeared the most likely to knock Johnson off the summit, the Australian just two adrift having been four off the pace at the start of the day.

Smith made it to the turn in 33, his remarkable approach shot from a bed of pine needles setting up his fourth birdie of the day on the ninth.

Elsewhere on the course, five-time Masters champion Tiger Woods endured a torrid time on the par-three 10th, incredibly carding a 10 after three visits to Rae's Creek

Defending Masters champion Tiger Woods hit a 10 with three water balls on the par three 12th at Augusta on Sunday.

Woods imploded at Rae's Creek during his final round, with his tee shot bouncing back into the water and a wedge from his subsequent drop rolling into the drink off the green.

His next attempt found the back right bunker but another horrible shot floated over the green and he was in the wet stuff for a third time.

The 15-time major champion finally managed to two-putt and find the hole, slipping from three under for the tournament to four over. His Sunday round slumped to nine over.

Dustin Johnson has another chance to turn a 54-hole lead into a major title ahead of the final round of the Masters.

The world number one carded a seven-under 65 at Augusta on Saturday to open up a four-stroke lead and be well-placed for a second major crown.

The 54-hole lead is the fifth of Johnson's major career, and he has failed to convert any of the previous four into victories.

Brooks Koepka took a jab at Johnson's major total during the US PGA Championship earlier this year. Johnson took a one-stroke lead into the final round at TPC Harding Park, before finishing tied for second behind Collin Morikawa.

Johnson has dominated on the PGA Tour since that event, winning the Northern Trust before four straight top-six finishes prior to the Masters.

But can the 23-time winner on the Tour turn another 54-hole lead into a second major title?

Johnson previously led after the third round at three U.S. Opens (2010, 2015 and 2018) and this year's US PGA. Aside from his implosion at Pebble Beach a decade ago, he finished in the top three at the other three.

The 2010 U.S. Open was the only other time in his career that Johnson has led by three shots or more heading into the final round of a major, but will the 2020 Masters be a different story?

2010 U.S. Open

It fell apart quickly for Johnson 10 years ago. A three-stroke lead evaporated on the back of a triple bogey at the second hole and double bogey at the third, and he finished with six more bogeys in his round as Graeme McDowell went on to win by one. Johnson finished tied for eighth at five over. It represented the largest lead lost by a 54-hole leader at the U.S. Open since 2005, when Retief Goosen gave up a three-shot lead, and Michael Campbell capitalised.

2015 U.S. Open

Johnson entered the final round sharing a three-shot lead with Jordan Spieth, Jason Day and Branden Grace. The big-hitting Johnson went to the final green with a chance to win his first major, facing a 12-foot eagle putt for victory. But he incredibly three-putted, handing Spieth the title. It was his ninth top-10 finish in 25 major starts.

2018 U.S. Open

At this stage already a U.S. Open champion, Johnson found himself in a familiar position after three rounds – in a four-way tie for the lead, this time alongside Koepka, Tony Finau and Daniel Berger. But Koepka's final-round 68 proved too good at Shinnecock Hills, Johnson's 70 enough for third place, behind the charging Tommy Fleetwood (63).

2020 US PGA Championship

A four-time major winner, Koepka questioned Johnson's tally before the final round in San Francisco, where the latter held a one-stroke lead. But Morikawa stole the show in the final round with a stunning six-under 64. It marked Johnson's fifth runner-up finish in a major and he became the first player to finish second at the US PGA in consecutive years since Jack Nicklaus (1964-65).

Tiger Woods has given no consideration to the emotions that may come with placing the green jacket on a new Masters champion on Sunday as his focus was purely on attempting to stay in contention in round three.

Last year, Woods ended an 11-year wait for a 15th major title with a stunning triumph at Augusta National, his fifth Masters win and one shy of Jack Nicklaus' overall record.

An even-par 72 on Saturday means he is 11 strokes off leader Dustin Johnson, whose score of 16 under matches the 54-hole record set by Jordan Spieth in 2015.

Johnson is four shots clear at the top of the leaderboard and whether Woods is awarding his fellow American a green jacket or someone else in contention, he has not thought about how he will feel doing so. 

"I have not. Tuesday [the Champions Dinner] was a long, tough day for me, but I have not thought about tomorrow yet," Woods told a news conference following Saturday's round. 

"I was focused on trying to get myself in contention going into tomorrow.

"I just found out that the tee times are going to be a bit early tomorrow and going off two tees, so I didn't know what that bracket was going to be.

"I don't know exactly what position I'm in. I certainly will be part of the early part of the split and get after it tomorrow. We'll see how emotional it'll be after tomorrow's round."

While Johnson hunts a maiden Masters victory, this year marked the 25th anniversary of Woods' first appearance at the major, as an amateur in April 1995.

With the 2020 tournament pushed back to November due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the course has proven unpredictable for many seasoned competitors, including Woods, who stated earlier in the week that previous champions would be favoured once the ground firmed up.

"Well, it got a little bit faster, yes, but the putts just still aren't quite breaking," said Woods, who also said he was dealing with back pain during his third round.

"Some of the downhill putts are starting to move a little bit, but the uphill putts – we normally say that everything breaks towards Rae's Creek, and the greens can get a little touch grainy. 

"That's definitely been the case this week, just because they've been a little bit longer."

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